1959 Bobby Fischer Newspaper Articles Archive

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The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Thursday, January 01, 1959 - Page 5

Fischer's great win
The 15-year-old United States champion, Bobby Fischer, has just brought off another astonishing victory in the current American championship by winning Reshevsky's queen in only twelve moves. Reshevsky is considered by many the world's greatest player outside Russia.
Reshevsky resigned 30 moves later. Fischer leads the tournament with four out of five.
The modern forms of the King's Indian Defence, in which Black combines the fianchetto of his KB with a general pawn advance on the queen's wing, are so popular nowadays that there is a tendency to underestimate White's opportunities for central break-through if Black carries out his plans inaccurately. The following example was won by the young Hungarian champion who is now competing at Hastings.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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The Times, San Mateo, California, Thursday, January 01, 1959 - Page 107

Chess Champ
New York (AP)—Bobby Fischer, 15, won the national chess title Sunday for the second straight year.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Minneapolis Star, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Friday, January 02, 1959 - Page 24

SAMUEL RESHEVSKY, five times champion, moved into second place behind defending champion Bobby Fischer in the national chess tournament when he defeated James T. Sherwin for a 7-3 record. Fischer is 7-2.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Battle Creek Enquirer, Battle Creek, Michigan, Friday, January 02, 1959 - Page 12

Former Olivet Man Seeks Chess Crown
OLIVET—Donald Byrne, a former English instructor at Olivet College, is still competing for the national chess championship in New York City. He defeated Brother Robert of Indianapolis in 53 moves in an adjourned match of the ninth round.
Veteran Samuel Reshevsky, five times former U.S. champion who Byrne played to a draw in an earlier round, is in second place with a record of seven wins and three losses. Still in first place is 15-year-old Bobby Fischer, U.S. Champion, who has a 7-2 record.
Byrne is now residing in Valparaiso, Ind.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Ironwood Daily Globe, Ironwood, Michigan, Friday, January 02, 1959 - Page 12

Reshevsky in Second Place in Chess Match
NEW YORK (AP) — Veteran Samuel Reshevsky, five times former champion, moved into second place behind defending titleholder Bobby Fischer in the National Chess Tournament Thursday night when he defeated James T. Sherwin in 37 moves.
Reshevsky, a round ahead of the other leaders, has a 7-3 record compared to 7-2 for Fischer.
In the only other match, Donald Byrne of Olivet, Mich., defeated Brother Robert of Indianapolis in 53 moves in a match adjourned from the ninth round.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, January 03, 1959 - Page 14

Fischer, Bisguier Adjourn In Chess
Defender and Former Holder of Title on Even Terms After Making 40 Moves

Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old United States chess champion, and Arthur B. Bisguier, former holder of the title, fought for five hours last night in the tenth round of the tournament for the Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy. They adjourned on even terms after forty moves had been recorded at the Manhattan Chess Club.
Fischer played the Ruy Lopez, both castling on the king's side of the board. His opponent became very aggressive and tested the champion's defensive powers to the utmost. Ultimately, after a sacrifice of a bishop had been refused, the black forces retreated and the defender was holding his own when play ceased.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Vidette-Messenger of Porter County, Valparaiso, Indiana, Saturday, January 03, 1959 - Page 5

Byrne Moves Up In Chess
NEW YORK (AP) — Donald Byrne of Valparaiso, Ind., defeated Charles Kalme of Philadelphia in 26 moves and Paul Benko, a Hungarian refugee, turned back Ray Weinstein of Brooklyn College in 40 moves Friday night in the National Chess Championship.
The victories gave Byrne a 5½-4½ record and Benko a mark of 4½-4½. They were the only completed matches.
Bobby Fischer, the teen-age ace from Brooklyn, still leads with a 7-2 record.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, January 04, 1959 - Page 230

Fischer Sets Back Bisguier In Chess
15-Year-Old Brooklyn Boy Needs Only Draw in Last Round to Retain Title

Taking eight-six moves in all, Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, the 15-year-old defending United States champion, defeated Arthur B. Bisguier in their adjourned game from the tenth round at the Manhattan Chess Club yesterday.
With a score of 8—2, Fischer needs merely to draw in the final round today to retain the title he won a year ago.
The only one who can overtaken him is Samuel Reshevsky, an international grandmaster who has a score of 7—3. To bring about a tie, Fischer must lost, while Reshevsky wins.
When play was adjourned Friday night, the dangerous attack engineered by Bisguier had been offset. They had reached a rook ending, with a pawn on each side, and a draw was foreseen. However, the young champion applied himself to the task of extracting something out of nothing.
By crowding the black king, he was able to capture his opponent's pawn. At the same time he held off Bisguier's king, while advancing his own pawn. Finally rooks were exchanged and the started spectators realized Fischer had what is technically known as the “opposition.” Bisguier good-naturedly resigned and shook hands.
Larry Evans, former national champion, resigned without further play a game with William Lombardy, the world junior champion, in which forty moves had been made.
Robert Byrne of Indianapolis won in forty-eight moves from Edmar Mednis of New York University.
Champion Traps Rival
The United States championship tournament for the Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy, being played at the Manhattan Chess Club, will stand out in chess history for one game.
This encounter, the details of which will be included in forthcoming anthologies of master play, was won by Bobby Fischer, the 15-year-old Brooklyn schoolboy, the defending champion, from Samuel Reshevsky, famous the world over as America's international chess ace and a claimant to the championship of the Western world.
The youth caught the old master napping in an obscure trap in the much-analyzed Sicilian defense and won what must be regarded as the pivotal match of the tournament.
The score of this struggle, which will be examined with astonishment in all chess-playing countries, follows:

Fischer Beats Weinstein
Fischer also won an instructive game from Raymond Weinstein of Brooklyn College.
Arthur B. Bisguier, champion of the Manhattan Chess Club, won the longest, in two sessions, from Edmar Mednis, New York University, in 88 moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, January 04, 1959 - Pages 224, 225, 226, 228, 229, 230

Sports Review of 1958
Chess

A youngster dominated the chess scene in this country in 1958. Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old student at Erasmus Hall High School, Brooklyn, won the United States title. He gained additional honors in Europe.
By finishing among the first six at the interzonal tournament at Portoroz, Yugoslavia, Fischer earned a place in this year's tournament to determine a challenger for the world title and achieved the rank of international grand master.
An American team finished fourth among thirty-six nations in the chess Olympics at Munich, Germany. The Soviet Union maintained its supremacy there, with a line-up headed by the world champion, Mikhail Botvinnik.
The Russians also triumphed in the international students tournament at Varna, Bulgaria. The United States was sixth.
Early in the year Botvinnik defeated Vasily Smyslov to regain the world crown. Mme. Elizabeth Bykova of Moscow beat Mme. Olga Rubtsova for the women's title.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, January 04, 1959 - Page 36

Bobby Fischer Nearing Second U.S. Chess Title
NEW YORK, Jan. 3 (AP)—Fifteen-year-old Bobby Fischer of New York moved within one-half point of winning his second straight national chess title tonight when he defeated Arthur B. Bisguier of New York in 86 moves.
The victory in a 10th round adjourned match gave Fischer an 8-2 standing compared to 7-3 of veteran Samuel Reshevsky.
In other matches today, world juniro champion William Lombardy of New York defeated Larry Evans, New York, in 41 moves and Robert Byrne of Indianapolis turned back Edmar Mednis, New York University student, in 48. Charles Kalme, Philadelphia, and Paul Benko, Hungarian exile, played 50 moves to a draw.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, January 04, 1959 - Page 36

FISCHER IN LEAD, BEATS RESHEVSKY
In the most sensational game to date in the tournament for the United States Chess Championship, 15-year-old Bobby Fischer, playing in defense of his title, defeated former champion Samuel Reshevsky, according to a report form the New York Times.
Playing in the sixth round of the tournament at the Manhattan Chess Club in New York, Reshevsky countered Fischer's P-K4 with the Sicilian Defense. On his eighth turn Reshevsky moved his knight to the QR file, to exchange it for Fischer's bishop. This turned out to be a blunder.
Fischer promptly seized the opportunity for a subtle combination, based on the lack of mobility of the black queen. He sacrificed his bishop and followed with a move of his knight that imprisoned the queen. Reshevsky was forced to abandon that powerful piece in exchange for two minor pieces.
Reshevsky fought on but with virtually no hope. Fischer soon won a pawn and established a passed pawn on the queen side which could not be halted in the long run. Reshevsky resigned the struggle after 42 moves.
In two other completed games last week Fischer drew with Paul Benko and Donald Byrne to lead the tournament with a score of 4½-1½. He had previously defeated James T. Sherwin and Charles Kalme and drawn with William Lombardy.
Reshevsky came back in the seventh round with an important victory over Larry Evans, who had been in the lead for the first week. Playing the white pieces against the Nimzo-Indian Defense, Reshevsky started a king's side attack, sacrificing a pawn to obtain control of the king's bishop file.
Step by step Reshevsky gained ground until his pursuit of the black king was rewarded. Faced by a threatened checkmate, Evans gave up his queen for a rook but obtained only temporary relief. He was actually checkmated on the 39th move.
As a result Evans and Reshevsky were tied for second at 4-2, a score which was equaled by Arthur B. Bisguier. The latter is the only undefeated player beside Fischer.
Following are last week's results and games from the tournament:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, January 04, 1959 - Page 18

NEARS 2D TITLE
NEW YORK —(AP)—Fifteen-year-old Bobby Fischer of New York moved within one-half point of winning his second straight national chess championship Saturday night when he defeated Arthur B. Bisguier of New York in 86 moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, January 04, 1959 - Page 48

Chess Championship
“At present writing, Bobby Fischer leads the field, having defeated Samuel Reshevsky in their match, and his score now is 5-2. Reshevsky and two others are tied for second place.”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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Press and Sun-Bulletin, Binghamton, New York, Sunday, January 04, 1959 - Page 36

Chess Win Near
New York — (AP) — Fifteen-year-old Bobby Fischer of New York moved within one-half point of winning his second straight national chess championship tonight when he defeated Arthur B. Bisquier of New York in 86 moves. The victory in a 10th round, adjourned match gave Fischer an 8-2 standing compared to 7-3 for veteran Samuel Reshevsky.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Poughkeepsie Journal, Poughkeepsie, New York, Sunday, January 04, 1959 - Page 4

Boy, 15, Nears Chess Laurels
NEW YORK — (AP) — Fifteen-year-old Bobby Fischer of New York moved within one-half point of winning his second straight national chess championship last night when he defeated Arthur B. Bisguier of New York in 86 moves.
The victory in a 10th round adjourned match gave Fischer an 8-2 standing compared to 7-3 of veteran Samuel Reshevsky. World junior champion William Lombardy of New York defeated Larry Evens, New York, in 41 moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 38

Fischer Retains U.S. Chess Title; 15-Year-Old Student Draws Final Test With R. Byrne: Brooklyn Star Only Undefeated Player in Tourney
Caption: Bobby Fischer plots move in match with Robert Byrne at Manhattan Chess Club. United States chess champion becomes fidgety as he ponders the movement.
Decision had not been mad at this point but Fischer retained championship by gaining a draw in match.

15-Year-Old Student Draws Final Test With R. Byrne
Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn successfully defended his united States chess championship by drawing in the eleventh and final round of the Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy tournament at the Manhattan Chess Club yesterday. The talented 15-year-old student at Erasmus Hall High School in Flatbush drew with Robert Byrne of Indianapolis, the elder of the two Byrne brothers, in twenty-eight moves.
Fischer was the only undefeated player in the tournament. He had established himself so strongly in first place, thanks to his eighty-six-move victory over Arthur B. Bisguier in the semit final round that he needed only a draw to clinch his triumph. This he accomplished amid the applause of the fans in the crowded room. The applause ended quickly to avoid interference with other players who were still bent over their boards.
The finish could hardly be termed romantic. First Byrne declined the offer of a draw made by Fischer, who had set up a King's Indian defense.
Later Byrne found he could make no headway against the champion's sound defense. The boy marvel thereupon agreed to the proposal to split the point, which left him safe in first place with a score of 8½—2½. He won six games and drew five. Samuel Reshevsky of Spring Valley, N.Y., drew with Paul Benko, a Hungarian refugee, and finished in second place. They had made only fourteen moves, without either gaining any advantage. Reshevsky's final score of 7½-3½ was made up of five games won, five drawn and one lost—to Fischer.
Fischer's defeat of the international grandmaster in the sixth round was the turning point in the tournament.
Raymond Weinstein, Brooklyn College, held Donald Byrne of Valparaiso, Ind., to a draw in forty moves. With three games left, the standing was as follows:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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Herald and News, Klamath Falls, Oregon, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 9

CHESS
“NEW YORK—Fifteen-year old Bobby Fischer won the national chess title for the second straight year.”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 60

BOBBY FISCHER RETAINS U.S. CHESS CROWN
New York, Jan. 4 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, the 15 year old Brooklyn whiz kid, retained his national chess championship Sunday when he drew with Robert Byrne of Indianapolis in 28 moves.
That gave Fischer an 8½-2½ record. Bobby didn't lose a match, but a draw counts a half point in the losing column.
Samuel Reshevsky of New York, the only grand master competing, finished second with 7½-3½. His only loss was to Fischer. He drew with Paul Benko, a Hungarian refugee, in 14 moves in his final match.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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Nanaimo Daily News, Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 2

Fischer Wins U.S. Chess Title
NEW YORK (CP)—Brooklyn's Bobby Fischer won the United States chess championship for the second time in a row Sunday night by drawing his 11th and final match against Robert Byrne of Indianapolis.
The 15-year-old high school student was the only undefeated player in the tournament. He had established himself strongly in first place Saturday night after an 86-move win over Arthur B. Bisguier, and he needed only a draw to clinch the title. He won six games and drew five.
Samuel Reshevsky of Spring Valley, N.Y. drew with Paul Benko, a Hungarian refugee, after 14 moves. Reshevsky's final score of 7½-3½ was made up of five wins, five ties and one loss—to Fischer.
Fischer's defeat of the international grand master in the sixth round was the turning point in the tournament.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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Press and Sun-Bulletin, Binghamton, New York, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 16

Teenager Repeats World Chess Title: Old Men Stubborn … but Kid's Got It
New York—(AP)—An air of expectancy filled the arena and yet it was still.
The spectators sized up the opponents.
Their faces almost told their thoughts.
Could he repeat, they wondered. Could this youngster beat out the old master for the national championship?
Yes, a national title was at stake and the spectators were tense—the kind of tenseness that can grip only a national championship.
The youngster was only 15. His hair was mussed and he was wearing a striped sport shirt—just a boy trying to do a man's job. He was on the brink of the title.
He studied his opponent and the play started.
On and on, the test of nerves and brains went. The youngster used every trick at his command.

★ ★ ★

NOW HE WAS on the verge of winning.
But he called a half and offered his opponent a draw.
The opponent shook his head and scowled. He was not going to give up at this stage. He was going all out for the victory.
The teenager's eyes hardened.
Young as he was, he had been through this sort of thing before. Now he was expanding every last wile.
Two more hours went by and the battle continued.
Abruptly, his adversary called a halt. He was on the ropes. The shoe, indeed, was on the other foot.
“Will you settle for a draw?” he asked.
“Draw,” murmured the youngster, hardly raising his eyebrows.
The crowd grinned, but didn't make a sound.

★ ★ ★

NOT FAR AWAY, the older man—now 47 but himself once a child ace at his chosen game—sighed heavily.
The handwriting was on the wall. He couldn't win now.

“Will you settle for a draw?” he whispered to his opponent.
“Draw,” said the opponent

The older man had lost only one match in the weeklong championship tournament. But that was a fatal one. He had been beaten by the teenager after being drawn into a trap that even the spectators recognized.
It was, he reflected, one of the biggest mistakes of his long and glorious career.

He looked at the scoreboard. The youngster finished with a mark of 8½-2½. He had 7½-3½.

And that's how Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old Brooklyn high school student, won his second consecutive United States chess championship yesterday. And that's how Grand Master Samuel Reshevsky, five times former champion, lost it.
Fischer's final-match draw was with Robert Byrne of Indianapolis in 28 moves. Reshevsky drew with Paul Benko, a Hungarian refugee, in 14 moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Minneapolis Star, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 25

Fischer Wins
NEW YORK—(AP)—Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old Brooklyn high school boy, won his second consecutive United States chess championship Sunday. He beat out Samuel Reshevsky, five-time champion, 8½-2½ to 7½-3½.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Indianapolis News, Indianapolis, Indiana, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 15

Chess
Fifteen-year-old Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn won his second straight national championship in New York when he drew with Robert Byrne of Indianapolis in 28 moves. That gave Fischer an 8½-2½ record. Samuel Reshevsky of New York finished second with 7½-3½.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, January 06, 1959 - Page 38

Sherwin Defeats Evans In 42 Moves: Takes Third Place in U.S. Chess Tourney—Bisguier and Lombardy in Draw
Adjourned games, with one exception, were decided last night in the annual United States championship tournament for the Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy at the Manhattan Chess Club. Bobby Fischer retained the title Sunday night.
James T. Sherwin, former New York State champion who was third in this tourney a year ago, wound up in the same position. He defeated Larry Evans, a former titleholder, in forty-two moves.
Sherwin's final score was 6&half-—4½. He outplayed Evans brilliantly through the sacrifice of a knight for two pawns. This led to an ending of a rook against two bishops, with queens still on the board.
Unable to avoid checkmate, Evans resigned and dropped in the standing to a four-way deadlock for fourth place. Tied with him were Donald Byrne of Valparaiso, Ind.; Arthur B. Bisguier, former national title-holder, and William Lombardy, world junior champion.
Bisguier and Lombardy drew their eleventh-round game in forty-one moves.
Paul Benko, who gained an international grandmastership at Portoroz, Yugoslavia, where he won a game for Fischer, defeated Raymond Weinstein, Brooklyn College, in 54 moves in the match resumed from the tenth round.
The Marshall Chess Club plans a reception for this evening, at which Fischer will be presented with the Frank J. Marshall Cup, donated by the club as a memorial to the late undefeated champion of the United States.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, January 08, 1959 - Page 38

Fischer To Get Medal
Erasmus Hall High to Honor U.S. Chess Champion

Bobby Fischer, a 15-year-old junior at Erasmus Hall High School in Brooklyn, has been asked to report to the principal's office at 1:30 o'clock this afternoon. It will be a pleasant visit.
Last Sunday, Bobby completed a successful defense of his United States chess championship. Last year he became an international grand master in the game.
The student council at Erasmus Hall has voted to give a gold medal to Bobby in recognition of his accomplishments. The presentation is to be made by the principal, Dr. John F. McNeill, today in his office at 911 Flatbush Avenue.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, January 08, 1959 - Page 7

Bobby Fischer, 15, Wins U.S. Tourney Twice
At the age of 15, Bobby Fischer, Brooklyn high school student is two-time winner of the United States chess championship.
Fischer went undefeated and successfully defended the title he won last year in the 11-round championship event, which now carries with it the Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy. Bobby's victory was cleancut, 6 victories and 5 draws giving him a final score of 8½-2½. This was a full point advantage over five-time former champion Samuel Reshevsky, which at 7½-3½ was likewise a full point ahead of James T. Sherwin in third.

The field could not have been a stronger one, making Fischer's victory all the more glowing. And as cream on the peaces, he clinched it by a sensational triumph over Reshevsky in their match, the score of which is reproduced below with notes by the New York Times reporter.
‘(A) Here is where Reshevsky over-anxious to be rid of the powerful white bishop, went astray and gave the alert schoolboy his big chance. Fischer was prepared for it. He sacrificed the bishop in question brought out the black king seemingly in a safe retreat, and then parted with a knight. The black queen was hemmed in and had to be abandoned in exchange for two pieces. From then on Fischer pressed his advantage, step by step, until Reshevsky resigned after 42 moves.
(B) Somewhat better would have been 9 KtxB although Fischer still would have had the advantage.’

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, January 09, 1959 - Page 26

A Medal for Bobby Fischer
They gave Bobby Fischer a gold medal yesterday at Erasmus Hall High School in Brooklyn. It was the first time in that school's long and honorable history that the Student Council has ever done such a thing, but then 15-year-olds like Bobby Fischer don't come along every day, or even every decade. At that age youngsters are likely to be playing junior varsity football or basketball, while Bobby has just won the United States chess championship for the second year in a row. Last year he won the right to compete with the world's chess greats in a competition to decide who will challenge the present world champion next year.
We find Bobby Fischer a comforting phenomenon after all the recent talk about the faults of our young people. He has grown up in the television age, but he prefers playing chess to watching Westerns. He may listen to rock 'n' roll occasionally, but his marks in geometry and Spanish are nothing to be ashamed of.
This country must have many, many thousands of talented youngsters. It is the job of us adults to make sure that all of them get the opportunity and incentive to develop their talents.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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The Morning Herald, Hagerstown, Maryland, Friday, January 09, 1959 - Page 31

Master At Chess — That whiz kid on the chess board, Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old Brooklyn, N.Y., youth plays tennis at Grossinger, N.Y. after retaining his U.S. chess crown.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Times, Munster, Indiana, Monday, February 09, 1959 - Page 13


Fort Lauderdale News, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Sunday, January 11, 1959 - Page 25
Let's Play Chess By Frank Rose

U.S. Championship
Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old chess genius from Brooklyn, successfully defended his title as U.S. Chess Champion with the convincing score of 8½-2½. He won six games and drew five. Samuel Reshevsky was runner-up with 7½-3½, scoring five wins, five draws and one loss to Fischer. Here are the results: …
SICILIAN DEFENSE
Although his game with Reshevsky lasted 42 moves Fischer had a “won” game after his ninth move. His play sparkles with daring and originality as he captures new meaning in a hackneyed position. Like Alekhine, he can say, “Why should I play by the Book? I am the Book.”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Journal Times, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, January 11, 1959 - Page 39

FISCHER COPS ROSENWALD
Young Bobby Fischer, who last year won just about every American chess honor, including the U.S. championship (junior, open, and U.S. C.F.), forced Donald Byrne to accept a draw in the final round of this year's Rosenwald U.S.C.F. tournament to assure himself a clear win. Fischer went undefeated in the event, and won over Reshevsky in their individual game to drop the Western Hemisphere champion to second place.
Fischer had the added satisfaction of finishing higher than Pal Benko, who placed third to Fischer's fifth in the recent interzonal at Potoroz, Yugoslavia, though both qualified for the World Candidates' tournament coming up this summer.
With no notable exception, the field in the Rosenwald included all the strongest players in the U.S. Fischer, thus remains the “man” to beat.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky, Sunday, January 11, 1959 - Page 32

Fischer Retains American Title; German Master Wins at Hastings
America's chess prodigy, Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, has done it again!
The 15-year-old United States champion retained his title last week when he finished on top of the finest field this country could muster. It was the New York tournament for the Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy.
Fischer's victory was not easy, though. It was a bruising battle right down to the wire before he edged out Samuel Reshevsky, also of Brooklyn and Larry Evans of New York City.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Nanaimo Daily News, Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada, Thursday, January 15, 1959 - Page 3

Fifteen-Year-Old Chess Champ In World Finals
By Joseph MacSween, Canadian Press Staff Writer
NEW YORK (CP) — The thin shoulders of a Brooklyn schoolboy carry the main United States hopes of winning the world chess championship from Russia.
The boy is Bobby Fischer, 15, and victory for him would be one of the biggest upsets in the ancient history of chess.
“It would be nice,” is the way Bobby put it, with a rare grin at his own understatement.
Bobby — who would prefer the more dignified Robert when he plays chess — recently retained the U.S. crown without losing a game. He won six games and drew five, playing as usual against the best American grownups.
The world's youngest grand master of the game, he will next take part in an elimination tournament of international grand masters to decide who will challenge Mikhail Botvinnik, the 47-year-old Moscow electrical engineer who is king of them all

CALLED GENIUS
“Bobby may not look it — he doesn't look like an intellectual — but he's a genius,” says Hans Kmoch, secretary of the Manhattan Chess Club, where the U.S. tournament is held.
“He's professionally arrogant,” says one mildly critical associate.
“He's a nice, fine, modest boy,” says Mrs. Grace L. Corey, administrative assistant of Erasmus Hall high school, where Bobby is a student.
What does Bobby himself say?
“I'll talk about nothing but chess,” said the master, distrustful and slightly belligerant when approached by a reporter.
Tall and gangling, he has the typical adolescent slouch and harsh voice of the Brooklyn teenager. In looks he could well be a rock 'n' roll addict as a dedicated chess player.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Austin Daily Herald, Austin, Minnesota, Thursday, January 15, 1959 - Page 4

Austin Daily Herald's POT POURRI
A HIGH school in Brooklyn decided that even though he had never given medals to anyone, the situation this time warranted a break in precedent. It gave a gold medal to one of its 15-year-old students, Bobby Fischer. No one said he didn't deserve it.
For Bobby had just won the United States chess championship for the second year in a row. And last year he won the right to compete with the world's chess greats in a competition to decide who will challenge the present world champion next year. He is one of many American youngsters in fields where brains reign supreme.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, January 18, 1959 - Page 247

Fischer, Uhlmann Top Chess Roosts; 15-Year-Old Boy Dominates U.S. Picture — East German Swept English Laurels
With the close of the tournaments in New York and Hastings the international chess scene now is quiet.
Bobby Fischer retained his United States championship, while Wolfgang Uhlmann of East Germany gathered highest laurels in England.
The first opportunity for them to meet would be during May when, according to a reliable report from Switzerland, a jubilee tournament will be staged in Muenchenstein.
While this is virtually in Uhlmann's back yard, the distance and other considerations will operate adversely to the 15-year-old schoolboy now so effectively in a role recognized universally. Furthermore, Fischer doesn't want to miss his classes at Erasmus Hall High School.
Here are two examples of his skill in the recent United States championship:

Fischer is not neglecting his practice. He excelled at rapid transit play in the weekly tournament at the Marshall Chess Club where, scoring 10½-2½, he shared the first two prizes with James T. Sherwin, No. 3 in the recent national competition. Jack W. Collins tied at 9½-3½ with Bernard Hill. Fifth prize went to Louis Levy, 9-4.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, January 18, 1959 - Page 45

Championship Games
The table of the U.S. Chess Championship Tournament below shows the solidity of Bobby Fischer's triumph. He was the only player not to lose a game outright and he scored victories against his top three opponents.
Following are some hard-fought battles from the event.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Express and News, San Antonio, Texas, Sunday, January 18, 1959 - Page 75

“This is not the case with Bobby Fischer. He is in the midst of the U.S. National Championship, and going strong. With two rounds remaining, he is leading such notables as Reshevsky, Bisguier, Evans, Lombardy, Donald and Robert Byrne, Sherwin, Mednis, and Benko. And he is only 15! Surely a future world champion!”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, January 22, 1959 - Page 36

We are indebted to the Illustrated London News
“…One reason for the failure of the United States to finish better than fourth, probably, was Bobby Fischer's absence from the team. It is news to us, however, if the reason for his absence was “because he had not been guaranteed a big enough fee,” as the London weekly says. There was the little matter of Bobby's attending classes at Erasmus Hall. Even a chess prodigy in the USA isn't excused from school for weeks to play chess—and what “fees” does the London writer think American chess players get or expect for playing in tournaments?
It was known of course, that Reshevsky's refusal, as an orthodox Jew, to play on Fridays and Saturdays and the refusal of the tournament organizers to schedule his matches on other days, was a big handicap to our team. The London magazine also says the most important matches, by chance, seemed to fall on the days he could not play.
“If this were not enough,” says the News, our “next best player, William Lombardy, went driving a car without a license valid in Germany and involved himself in a minor accident. For several days he dared not start a game for fear that a summons to court might prevent him from finishing it!”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Express and News, San Antonio, Texas, Sunday, January 25, 1959 - Page 81

Championship Chess by Blake Stevens, Texas State Champion
Bobby Fischer has added another feather to his cap, winning the U.S. national chess championship a full point ahead of Reshevsky and scoring six wins and five draws.
He turned in fine games against Reshevsky, Bisguier, and Mednis. This moves us to predict that young Fischer will tie for fourth place in the forthcoming Candidate's Tournament, and this will be a tremendous feat. Remember the stellar lineup includes Tahl, Petrosian, Smyslov, Keres, Gligoric, Olafsson and Benko.
The whole chess world knows that Fischer employs the Sicilian Defense almost exclusively. Will the Russians prepare traps in this opening? Undoubtedly.
The following game presents a deep pitfall in which black stumbles headlong. Fischer confronted with the possibility of making the same error that Black does in this game, would probably neatly sidestep the danger. The queen sacrifice offered by White is piquant and fantastically clever, unleashing a flood of tactics.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, January 25, 1959 - Page 219

Reshevsky Urges Match-Play Test
Contends Tournament Does Not Establish True Skill of Any Two Masters

At the conclusion of the last United States chess championship tournament, in which he was runner-up to Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, Samuel Reshevsky of Spring Valley, N.Y., conceded the cleverness of his 15-year-old rival and predicted a great future for him.
However, he made the point the real test of the comparative skills of any two players could be had only in match rather than in tournament play.
He reaffirmed that conviction last week before leaving for the Pacific Coast, where the leading players in Southern California are awaiting his visit.
In the 1957-58 United States championship, Fischer got the decision when Reshevsky lost to William Lombardy in the final. In the recent tournament, the turning point came in the sixth round when Reshevsky's only loss was brought about by Fischer himself.
Gist of Contention
The gist of Reshevsky's contention is that in a set match between two opponents and without any intervention on the part of outsiders, the actual merit of the pair is most likely to be established.
It was this method that prevailed when the late Frank J. Marshall retired and the United States Chess Federation took over. Reshevsky has been champion five times and Arnold S. Denker, Larry Evans and Arthur B. Bisguier once each.
There has been discussion of the desirability of a Fischer-Reshevsky match, but so far nothing has come of it.
It is true that if Fischer can get away to play in the world championship challengers' tournament, a try-out against Reshevsky would provide the ideal preparation.
Meanwhile Reshevsky is enjoying a much-needed respite after his strenuous exertions here and abroad.
Following are two more games from the United States championship:
Tourney for Yugoslavia
Yugoslavia again will be the guest country for the challengers' tournament in September and October, although the exact locality has not been announced.
It is reported that bids have been received from six resorts. Of these Bled is strongly favored.
It will not be the first time for it to be the site of an important gathering of grandmasters. The goal of his one is the selection of the next opponent for Mikhail Botvinnik of the Soviet Union for the world championship. Fischer is one of eight who are eligible.
Another selection of games played in the interzonal tournament at Portoroz follows:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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St. Louis Post-Dispatch, St. Louis, Missouri, Tuesday, January 27, 1959 - Page 33

He's Chess Champ, But Still Just a Boy
By Milt Freudenheim

NEW YORK, Jan. 27.
The Chicago Daily News-Post-Dispatch Special Dispatch. Copyright 1959.
INTERNATIONAL grandmaster of chess Robert J. Fischer asked that presentation of his second consecutive United States championship cup be delayed briefly.
The presentation would have conflicted with his preparations for midyear examinations at Erasmus High School, where 15-year-old Fischer is in his junior year.
Bobby Fischer, said to be the youngest international grandmaster in the history of chess, won't slight his school work.
“If I had a lot of money, I'd like to play in chess tournaments (and nothing else). But you can't make a living in chess,” he says.
His prize as American champ was $600. It took the combined efforts of a television show, wealthy chess patrons, the United States Department and the Soviet Government to get him to Europe for big matches last year.
And the fact that Bobby—away from the chess board—is just a typical, big, clumsy, shy, self-centered teen-aged kid from Brooklyn has cooled the ardor of would be patrons more than once.
But the champ playing chess is another story. He held his own with some of the world's best at the interzonal tourney last summer at Portoroz, Yugoslavia.
“Little Bobby,” as enthusiastic Yugoslav fans dubbed him, won the right to return in September 1959 for eight-man playoffs.
The 1959 winner takes on world champion Mikhail Botvinnik of Russia in 1960.
If by some combination of wizardry and good luck, a teenage American beats the Soviet world champion, the repercussions could be awesome.
In contrast to the United States which ignores chess, and kids its experts, the Soviets teach the game in school. Russian champs are pampered, given soft jobs and movie-star treatment.
But like competing with the Russians in sputniks and luniks, polishing up Bobby Fischer will not be easy.
The six-foot, Chicago-born chess genius wishes the public would please go away. He may be the first boy his age in history to deliberately repel the advances of would-be biographers from Reader's Digest and the Saturday Evening Post.
Bobby contends the press aims to use him in a conspiracy “to make chess players look like funny people.”
Actually, he looks like the boy down the block, favoring bright flannel shirts, never a tie corduroy slacks, unshined shoes, crewcut brown hair needing a trim—even on an evening trip to a chess club in Manhattan.
Bobby handles himself like a basketball player, long-limbed and loose jointed, dropping a chess piece into place in a fast game of “rapid transit” (10 seconds a move) or “blitz” (no pauses at all).
He likes sports. Some New York reporters have shined up to him by taking him to hockey games or hitting tennis balls with him. A ski pro traded ski lessons for chess lessons with Bobby.
At Erasmus High, he studied Russian to use in Moscow, “I'm pretty good at Spanish, and I like science, astronomy most of all,” he says.
Born March 12, 1943, Bobby loved puzzles as a baby, according to his mother, Mrs. Regina Fischer, a nurse. His parents were divorced when he was 2.
His sister taught him chess when he was 6. In fourth grade he won a scholarship to a Brooklyn school where his chess was encouraged.
At the Brooklyn Chess Club, president Carmine Nigro “helped me more than anybody,” Bobby recalls. By the time he was 12, he was taking on big-timers at the Manhattan and Marshall Chess Clubs.
He was 14 when he beat famed Samuel Reshevsky, then 46, for the United States championship the first time. Repeating the feat a second year sealed Bobby's achievement. It couldn't be “luck” twice.
Short on friends his own age, Bobby spends most of his after school hours studying books on chess (which he remembers practically totally) and playing the game with adults.
Winning chess demands athlete-type training, boning up on opponents' past games, planning strategy. That plus schoolwork puts a heavy strain on Bobby's time.
For those who dare hope to checkmate the young champion, or others just interested in how he does it, book publishers Simon & Schuster are bringing out “Bobby Fischer's Games of Chess.”
Nearing 16, surrounded by chess glory, Bobby is beginning to notice the world now and then. “The other night he even came up and shook hands with my wife,” said a pleased former champion old enough to be Bobby's grandfather.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Oakland Tribune, Oakland, California, Wednesday, January 28, 1959 - Page 25

Chess History Is Topic for Museum Film
An unusual color film on the history of chess will be shown at the Oakland Art Museum starting today, according to curator Paul Mills.
Entitled “Passionate Pastime,” the film is narrated by Vincent Price, who explains that chess, like painting, music, wine, women and gambling, is a passion. The film traces the game from its known beginnings up to 14-year-old champion Bobby Fischer.
A second color film on life along a Nigerian river, “Ai-Ye,” will also be shown.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Thursday, January 29, 1959 - Page 10

The U.S. championship
It is one thing for an underestimated young player to put up a single outstanding performance, quite another for him to repeat it when all his opponents are making an extra effort. Yet Bobby Fischer, aged 15, had done so in retaining the United States championship without loss of a game. Among the also-rans were Reshevsky who is often regarded as the world's best grandmaster outside Russia, and Benko, who is, like Fischer one of the last eight in the world title eliminating tournament. The result in New York indicates that Fischer ought to put up a good showing this autumn against Smyslov, Tal, and company. His best wins were in long endings, so here is another all-grand master game from the tournament.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, February 08, 1959 - Page 34

Rosenwald Feature Game
Young Bobby Fischer, in winning the Rosenwald tournament for the second straight year, added insult to injury by defeating his chief rival, Reshevsky, with a trap that many “club” strength players would have seen. On only the ninth move Fischer sprung a trap that cost Reshevsky his queen for two minor pieces (the queen is worth at least three major pieces as a rule), and while the veteran struggled on for some 30 more moves he might have saved himself the trouble. When Reshevsky played 8 . . . N-R4 he unwittingly blocked his queen's escape path, and had to give it up to avoid a forced mate,
9. P-K5, N-K;
10. BxPch, KxB;
11. N-K6, KxN??;
12. Q-Q5ch, K-B4, P-N4ch and white mates in 3 more moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, February 12, 1959 - Page 6

National Ratings List Two Grand Masters
“The nation's two grand masters in these ratings, which do not take into account competition outside this country, are Samuel Reshevsky, who retains his No. 1 rank, and Robert J. (Bobby) Fischer. Reshevsky's rating is 2693 and Fischer's 2636.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Journal Times, Racine, Wisconsin, Friday, February 13, 1959 - Page 19

A GAME OPPONENT—Studying the board in the mirror atop his iron lung, 17-year-old polio patient Bruce Campbell played a match with two-time U.S. chess champion Bobby Fischer, 15, of Brooklyn, N.Y. The game was played at a hospital on Welfare Island, N.Y. where Bruce called out his moves and Bobby made them, and, incidentally, won the match.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Express and News, San Antonio, Texas, Sunday, February 22, 1959 - Page 73

“Bobby Fischer of the U.S.A. defeated his title last month. Tahl has his work cut out, but we predict he will come through again.”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Journal News, White Plains, New York, Wednesday, March 04, 1959 - Page 10

Ex-Chess Champion A Spring Valley Resident
Samuel Reshevsky Hopes to Recapture His American Title

By Richard Einhorn
If chess is considered a sport, then Samuel Reshevsky of Spring Valley must be the most famous athlete in Rockland County. Mr. Reshevsky, five feet two inches tall, has dominated American chess since 1936.
Now 47, he has been in the public eye longer than Joe Louis, Joe DiMaggio, or Ted Williams. Louis and DiMaggio, or Ted Williams. Louis and DiMaggio have retired, and Williams is near the end of the trail, but Reshevsky is playing as well as ever.
His ambition is to become champion of the world. He is determined to win that honor although he has been stripped of his United States title by a high school boy of immense talent.
Followers Optimistic
Reshevsky's followers feel that his loss to a 15-year-old Bobby Fischer was a fluke, that the famed international grandmaster will gain revenge on his brilliant young rival.
“I understand there are plans to arrange a match between Bobby Fischer and myself,” Reshevsky said last week. “I think everybody would like to see this match materialize.”
But Fischer hasn't said he's willing.
Like other leading American chess players, Reshevsky is starved for competition. He has gone for stretches of almost a year without playing in a tournament.
“What we need are at least four big events a year. I expected more from our players who are now in their twenties, but they haven't had enough competition.”
He said the best hope lies in young players like Bobby Fischer.
“It is a tremendous thing for the future of American chess that Fischer is so young,” Reshevsky said. “Youngsters all over the country are getting better.”
Likes Spring Valley
Reshevsky said that moving to Spring Valley from New York was one of the best things that had ever happened to him.
“It is quiet and peaceful,” he said. “A chess player needs rest and relaxation. You can hardly find a chess player in this town, though,” he added.
Most of Reshevsky's time has been spent at home with his wife, Norma, and their three children.
“Joel and Sylvia play chess,” he said proudly. “Only my two-year-old daughter doesn't.”
Reshevsky came to the United States in 1920 from Poland after having toured Europe as a nine-year-old prodigy. But his parents and advisers made him take time out from chess to complete his education.
He was a pitcher on his high school baseball team. Later he attended the University of Chicago, where he majored in mathematics.
Reshevsky said he would like to go into the insurance business in New York. His training apart from chess was in accountancy. He owns a number of chess sets, but his favorite is an olivewood set he won last year in a tournament in Israel.
Keeping his identity as a chess player, even when not playing a game, is no problem, he says. Every one of his dozens of neck-ties bears a chess symbol of some sort.
Reshevsky's future hopes center on a match with Mikhail Botvinnik of the USSR, the reigning world's champion. Botvinnik is Reshevsky's age, and he too, has held his own against younger men.
“Strange as it may seem,” Reshevsky said, “chess is a very taxing game. But if you have your health and lead a normal life you can remain a serious contender for many, many years. Botvinnik started at the same time I did.”
Reshevsky's recent record against Botvinnik has been good. In a team match between the United States and the Soviet Union in Moscow, Reshevsky won one and drew the other of their encounters.
Drew Four Games
Reshevsky also drew four games in a team match in New York with Vassily Smyslov, a Russian who temporarily displaced Botvinnik as champion. Most experts rate Smyslov on a par with Botvinnik.
“There isn't much to choose between Smyslov and Botvinnik,” Reshevsky said.
Besides Botvinnik and Smyslov, there are at least two other Soviet players of world championship caliber. And still others are clamoring for their place in the sun.
Why do the Russians have so many good players, Reshevsky was asked.
“All the good players in the U.S.S.R. are subsidized,” he explained. “They can devote all their time to chess.”
In a free enterprise system, he said, chess would have to be commercialized to permit players to compete full time. He said he hoped a promoter like Jack Kramer would sponsor touring groups of chess professionals.

[EDITOR NOTE — Reporter Dick Einhorn, Columbia University, was formerly a Chess Master. He has defeated, in informal games, United States Champion Bobby Fischer, and former American champs, Larry Evans, Arthur Bisguier, and Arnold Denker.]

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Tennessean, Nashville, Tennessee, Saturday, March 14, 1959 - Page 11

U.S. Whiz Enters
BUENOS AIRES—(AP)—The Argentine Chess federation said yesterday U.S. Master Bob Fischer, just turned 16, has accepted an invitation to play in an international tourney in Mar del Plata later this month.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Monday, March 16, 1959 - Page 12

Yugoslavs Like U.S. Chess Whiz
BELGRADE, March 15 (AP)—Yugoslavian chess fans are so wild about 16-year-old Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn they have named one of their chess clubs after him and think he may endanger Soviet chess supremacy.
This summer Yugoslavia will play host to one of the biggest events in world chess — the challengers' tournament. The winner will meet the world champion, Russia's grand master Mihail Botvinnik for the title.
Bobby became extremely popular in Yugoslavia last year when he played at Portoroz tournament and placed among the top entries for the challengers' tourney.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, March 22, 1959 - Page 94

Chess For Children
Reinfeld, a prolific American writer and a master chess player, has refined his chess vocabulary down to the level of the beginner, and has produced a book for both the child and the novice adult. Unique is his introduction in which he explains that “there are no less than 169,518,829,100,544 quadrillion ways to play the first 10 moves of a game of chess,” but that even a youngster can learn from a few basic patterns. Proof of this is the fact that the current United States champion is Bobby Fischer, a 14-year-old.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, March 25, 1959 - Page 31

Fischer Adjourns Opener
Mar Del Plata, Argentina, March 24 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, 16-year-old United States chess champion from Brooklyn, adjourned his opening game in the Argentine international chess tournament last night. Fischer made a tactical mistake against Jaime Emma and gave the 20-year-old lightly regarded Argentine player a chance to gain a draw.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Montgomery Advertiser, Montgomery, Alabama, Wednesday, March 25, 1959 - Page 12

U.S. Chess Champ Gains Draw In Match
MAR DEL PLATA, Argentina (AP)—Bobby Fischer, 16-year-old U.S. chess champion from Brooklyn, adjourned his opening match in the first round of the Argentine International Chess Tournament Monday night.
Apparently on the way to victory, Fischer made a serious tactical mistake against Argentine Jaime Emma which gave the 20-year-old lightly rated Argentine player, a chance to rally and gain the draw.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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The Logansport Press, Logansport, Indiana, Thursday, March 26, 1959 - Page 14

U.S. Chess Wizard, Age 15, In Two Draws
MAR DEL PLATA, Argentina (AP) —Bobby Fischer, America's 15-year-old chess master, figured in his second straight draw Wednesday in the international tournament here.
Fischer, U.S. national champion from Brooklyn, drew with Luis Sanchez of Colombia in 41 moves. Previously the Brooklyn boy drew with Jaime Emma of Argentina in 46 moves.
Ludek Pachman of Poland tops the standings with two straight victories.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Cincinnati Enquirer, Cincinnati, Ohio, Thursday, March 26, 1959 - Page 40

Fischer Draws in Chess Play
MAR DEL PRATA, Argentina, March 25 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, America's 15-year-old chess master, figured in his second straight draw today in the international tournament here.
Fischer, U.S. national champion from Brooklyn, drew with Luis Sanchez of Colombia in 41 moves. Previously the Brooklyn boy drew with Jaime Emma of Argentina in 46 moves.
Ludek Pachman of Poland topped the standings with two straight victories. Today he beat Hernan Pilnik, the Argentine champion, in 30 moves.
Other results: Hector Rosetto, Argentina, defeated Jaime Emma, Argentina, 28 moves; Souza Mendes, Brazil, drew with Raul Sanguineti, Argentina, 44 moves; Ruben Shocron, Argentina, defeated Argentino Redolfi, Argentina, 33 moves; Borislav Ivkov, Yugoslavia, defeated Bernardo Wexler, Argentina, 39 moves; Rene Latelier, Chile, drew with Miguel Najdorf, Argentina, 41 moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, March 27, 1959 - Page 31

Fischer Bows In Chess
Pachman Tops Brooklyn Youth in 3d Round in Argentina

Mar Del Plata, Argentina, March 25 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, the United States' teenage chess master, today failed for the third time to win a match in the international tournament.
The 16-year-old Brooklyn youth was defeated by Czechoslovakia's Ludek Pachman in their third-round adjourned game. Pachman won in thirty-five moves for this third victory. He leads the standing. Previously, Fischer had to settle for draws in his two other matches.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Montgomery Advertiser, Montgomery, Alabama, Friday, March 27, 1959 - Page 18

U.S. Chess Champion Has Yet To Win Match
MAR DEL PLATA, Argentina (AP)—Bobby Fischer, America's 16-year-old chess master, still has failed to win a match in the international tournament here.
After tieing his first two matches, the Brooklyn youth apparently was on the edge of losing the third. The match with Ludek Pachman of Czechoslovakia was adjourned Thursday after 41 moves with Pachman ahead.
Experts said Pachman was in a good position to win.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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The Bridgeport Post, Bridgeport, Connecticut, Friday, March 27, 1959 - Page 14

U.S. Chess Whiz Loses
MAR DEL PLATA, Argentina, March 27—(AP) Bobby Fischer, the United States teen-age chess wizard, failed for the third time Thursday to win a match in the international tournament. The 16-year-old Brooklyn youth was defeated by Czechoslovakia's Ludek Pachman in their third-round adjourned game. Pachman won in 35 moves for his third victory. Previously, Fischer had to settle for draws in his two other matches.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, March 28, 1959 - Page 21

Fischer Chess Victor
Brooklyn Youth Beats Mendez in 38 Moves in Argentina

Mar Del Plata, Argentina, March 27 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, 16-year-old United States champion from Brooklyn, won for the first time today in the Argentine masters chess tournament. Fischer beat Brazil's Souza Mendez in thirty-eight moves.
However, Fischer has only 2 points, compared to 3½ for Ludek Pachman of Czechoslovakia, the leader.
Pachman, who won his first three matches, including one against Fischer, drew with Hector Rossetto of Argentina in a hard-fought game lasting seventy-four moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, March 31, 1959 - Page 37

Fischer Chess Victor
Defeats Redolfi in 40 Moves in Argentine Tourney

Mar Del Plata, Argentina, March 30 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, the 15-year-old United States chess champion from Brooklyn, today defeated Argentino Redolfi of Argentina in forty moves.
Fischer is tied for seventh place with 3 points in an international tournament. He has won two matches, lost two and drawn twice.
Ludek Pachman, the Czech grand master, continues unbeaten in the tournament. He defeated Jacobo Bolbochan of Argentina in thirty-seven moves. Pachman leads the field of fifteen with 5 points on four victories and two draws.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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The Montgomery Advertiser, Montgomery, Alabama, Tuesday, March 31, 1959 - Page 11

U.S. Chess Champion Defeats Argentinian
MAR DEL PLATA, Argentina (AP)—Bobby Fischer, 15-year-old U.S. chess champion from Brooklyn, Monday defeated Argentino Redolfi of Argentina in 40 moves.
Fischer is tied for seventh place with three points in an international tournament. He has won two matches, lost two and drawn twice.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, April 01, 1959 - Page 50

Fischer Takes Match
U.S. Chess Champion Defeats Shocron in Argentina

Mar Del Plata, Argentina, March 31 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, the United States chess champion, defeated Ruben Shocron of Argentina today in forty moves.
The 15-year-old Brooklyn schoolboy scored his third victory in the international tournament. He has drawn twice and lost twice for 4 points.
Ludek Pachman, a Czech grand master, and Yugoslavia's Borislax Ivkov drew in twenty moves. Both are undefeated. Pachman, having played one more game than Ivkov, leads the tournament with 5½ points. Ivkov has 4½.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Arizona Daily Star, Tucson, Arizona, Wednesday, April 01, 1959 - Page 26

CHESS — Bobby Fischer, the United States chess champion, yesterday defeated Ruben Shocron of Argentina in 40 moves. The 15-year-old Brooklyn schoolboy scored his third victory in an international tournament. He has drawn twice and lost twice and has four points …

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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The Morning News, Wilmington, Delaware, Wednesday, April 01, 1959 - Page 40

FISCHER CHESS VICTOR
MAR DEL PLATA, Argentina, March 31 (AP) — Bobby Fischer, the United States chess champion, today defeated Ruben Shocron of Argentina in 40 moves. The 15-year-old Brooklyn school boy scored his third victory in an international tournament. He has drawn twice and lost twice and has four points.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Wednesday, April 01, 1959 - Page 21

Fischer Victor Over Shocron
MAR DEL PLATA, Argentina (AP) — Bobby Fischer, the United States chess champion, yesterday defeated Ruben Shocron of Argentina in 40 moves.
The 15-year-old Brooklyn schoolboy scored his third victory in an international tournament. He has drawn twice and lost twice and has four points.
Ludek Pachman, the Czech grand master, and Yugoslavia's Boris Ivkov, drew in 20 moves. Both are undefeated. Pachman, having played one more game than Ivkov, leads the tournament with 5½ points. Ivkov has 4½

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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The Cincinnati Enquirer, Cincinnati, Ohio, Thursday, April 02, 1959 - Page 34

Fischer In Draw
MAR DEL PLATA, Argentina, April 1 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, 16-year-old Brooklyn schoolboy who is the U.S. chess champion, drew with Miguel Najdorf of Argentina after 35 moves last night in the eighth round of the Argentine national tourney. In eight matches Fischer has won three, drawn three and lost two for 4½ points. He is in a tie for fourth place in the 15-man field.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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The Montgomery Advertiser, Montgomery, Alabama, Saturday, April 04, 1959 - Page 10

Fischer Grabs 2nd In Chess Tournament
MAR DEL PLATA, Argentina (AP)—Bobby Fischer, 16-year-old Brooklyn schoolboy who is in the U.S. chess championship, moved into a tie for second place in the international tourney Thursday night by defeating Raul Sanguineti of Argentina in 68 moves.
The triump gave Fischer 5½ points, just a half-point behind the three leaders—Borislav Ivkov of Yugoslavia, Luedek Pachman of Czechoslovakia and Miguel Najdorf of Argentina.
Rene Letelier of Chile and Hector Rossetto of Argentina are tied with Fischer.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa, California, Sunday, March 15, 1959 - Page 28

“Bobby Fischer, the 15-year-old Brooklyn champion of the United States held on to his title for the second year in a row. Bobby keeps up with all the latest traps in the opening. His victim in the sixth round was no one less than the great Sammy Reshevsky.”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, April 05, 1959 - Page 64

Fischer Turns Up In Mar Del Plata
A week ago there was a report that the brilliant American chess champion, 15-year-old Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, had mysteriously disappeared. He turned up calmly playing in the international master tournament at Mar del Plata, Argentina.
Bobby started off poorly. He drew his first two games against Emma of Argentina and L. Sanchez of Colombia. He was then set back by Ludek Pachman of Czechoslovakia. In the fourth round Fischer scored his first full point at the expense of Mendez of Brazil.
Pachman won his first three games to take the lead in the early stages. Others in the tournament are B. Ivkov of Yugoslavia, Letelier of Chile and an Argentine delegation including M. Najdorf, H. Pilnik, H. Rosetto and R. Sanguinetti.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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The Jackson Sun, Jackson, Tennessee, Sunday, April 05, 1959 - Page 16

Fischer Wins
MAR DEL PLATA, Argentina (AP) — U.S. champion Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, who lost his first two games in an international chess tourney here, won again Friday night and now is unbeaten in eight straight. The 16-year-old schoolboy's triumph kept him in a tie for second place.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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The Tampa Tribune, Tampa, Florida, Sunday, April 05, 1959 - Page 55

Young U.S. Chess Champ Wins Eighth Straight In Meet
MAR DEL PLATA, Argentina, April 4, (AP) — U.S. Champion Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, who lost his first two games in an international chess tourney here, won again last night and now is unbeaten in eight straight.
His triumph in 41 moves over Herman Pilnik, Argentine champion, kept him in a tie for second place with Miguel Najdorf, also of Argentina. Each has 6½ points.
The 16-year-old Brooklyn schoolboy and Najdorf trail Borislav Ivkov of Yugoslavia by half-a-point. A victory counts one point, a draw a half point. Fischer has played 10 of his 14 matches. Ivkov and Najdorf nine.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, April 07, 1959 - Page 44

Fischer Chess Victor
U.S. Champion Tops Rossetto in 37 Moves in Argentina

Mar Del Plata, Argentina, April 6 (AP)—Brooklyn's Bobby Fischer ran his unbeaten streak to nine matches by defeating Hector Rossetto of Argentina in an international chess tournament.
Fischer, the United States champion, won in thirty-seven moves last night. The 16-year-old player has a record of six victories, three draws and two defeats for 7½ points. A victory counts a point and a draw a half-point.
Bobby is in fourth place, a point behind the unbeaten leader, Miguel Najdorf of Argentina. Najdorf defeated Borislav Ivkov of Yugoslavia in forty-two moves. Ivkov and Ludek Pachman, the Czech master, are tied for second place with 8 points.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Tuesday, April 07, 1959 - Page 23

Boy Chess Champ Beats Argentine
MAR DEL PLATA, Argentina, April 6 (AP).—Brooklyn's Bobby Fischer ran his unbeaten streak to nine matches by defeating Hector Rossetto of Argentina in an international chess tournament.
Fischer, the United States champion, won in 37 moves last night. The 16-year-old marvel now has a record of six victories, three draws and two defeats for 7½ points.
Bobby is in fourth place, only a point behind the unbeaten leader, Miguel Najdorf, of Argentina.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Tuesday, April 07, 1959 - Page 3

Fischer Runs String to 9
MAR DEL PLATA, Argentina (AP)—Brooklyn's Bobby Fischer ran his unbeaten streak to nine matches by defeating Hector Rossetto of Argentina in an international chess tournament.
Fischer, the United States' champion, won in 37 moves last night. The 16-year-old marvel now has a record of six victories, three draws and two defeats for 7½ points
Bobby is in fourth place, only a point behind the unbeaten leader, Miguel Najdorf of Argentina. Najdorf defeated Borislay Iykov of Yugoslavia in 42 moves. Ivkov and Ludek Pachman, the Czech master, are tied for second place with eight points each.
The next round will be played Tuesday night.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, April 09, 1959 - Page 39

Fischer Turns Back Argentine In Chess
Mar Del Plata, Argentina, April 8 (AP)—Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn won again last night in the Argentine international chess tournament and remained tied for second place with Borislav Ivkov of Yugoslavia with only two rounds to play.
Fischer, 16, the United States champion, and Ivkov have 8½ points each. Miguel Najdorf of Argentina leads with 9.
Fischer's latest victim was Bernardo Wexler of Argentina.
In his match with Najdorf, Fischer resorted to his favorite King's Indian defense and held his own until the Argentine agreed to a draw.
Fischer was at his best in a flash finish with Ruben Shocron of Argentina, whose defense of a Ruy Lopez kept Fischer at bay for forty moves until a shock move brought a sudden conclusion.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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The Tennessean, Nashville, Tennessee, Thursday, April 09, 1959 - Page 35

U.S. Chess Champ 2nd
MAR DEL PLATA, Argentina—(AP)—Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, won again Tuesday night in the Argentine international chess tournament and remains tied for second place with Borislav Ivkov of Yugoslavia with only two rounds of play left.
Fischer, who is the U.S. champion although only 16, and Ivkov have 8½ points each. Miguel Najdorf of Argentina, leads with 9.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Cincinnati Enquirer, Cincinnati, Ohio, Thursday, April 09, 1959 - Page 53

Fischer Winner
MAR DEL PLATA, Argentina, April 8 (AP)—Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn won again last night in the Argentine International Chess Tournament and remains tied for second place with Borislav Ivkov of Yugoslavia with only two rounds of play left. Fischer, who is the U.S. champion although only 16, and Ivkov have 8½ points each. Miguel Najdorf of Argentina leads with 9. Fischer's latest victim was Bernardo Wexler of Argentina. The match went 38 moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Pensacola News Journal, Pensacola, Florida, Thursday, April 09, 1959 - Page 21

Tied For Second
MAR DEL PLATA, Argentina, (AP)—Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn won again Wednesday night in the Argentine International Chess Tournament and remains tied for second place with Borislav Ivkov of Yugoslavia with only two rounds of play left.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, April 10, 1959 - Page 41

2 Share Honors In Chess Tourney
Pachman, Najdorf Deadlock in Argentina — Fischer Ties for Third Place

Mar Del Plata, Argentina, April 9 (AP) — Ludek Pachman of Czechoslovakia and Miguel Najdorf of Argentina tied for first place in an international chess tournament that ended today. Each wound up with 10½ points.
Bobby Fischer, 16-year-old Brooklynite, tied for third with Yugoslavia's Borislav Ivkov at 10 points. In his final match Fischer drew with Ivkov.
Last night Fischer defeated Jacobo Bolbochan of Argentina in fifty-six moves.
Fischer Score Listed
Among Bobby Fischer's defeated opponents was Herman Pilnik of Buenos Aires who, next to Najdorf, is the oldest of the competitors at Mar del Plata.
The United States champion resorted to a line in the Sicilian defense, of which he is fond and has been well-tested. Pilnik gave a good account of himself for forty-one moves but was outwitted in a rook-and-bishop ending.
Najdorf faced with an English opening adopted by Hector Rossetto of Argentina, chose the King's Indian defense. This match was stubbornly contested, but Najdorf succeeded in capturing a pawn and gained the verdict in a rook-and-pawn ending after fifty-nine moves.

Maurice J. Kasper was re-elected president of the Mahattan Chess Club last night. Morris Steinberg, Edward W. Turner and Mrs. Cecil Wertheim were chosen as vice presidents.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Friday, April 10, 1959 - Page 22

Fischer Ties For Third in Chess
BUENOS AIRES (AP) —Grand Masters Ludek Pachman of Czechoslovakia and Miguel Najdorf of Argentina tied for the first place in the International Chess Tournament which ended yesterday. Each wound up with 10½ points.
Bobby Fischer, 16-year-old New Yorker, tied for third with Yugoslavia's Borislav Ivkov, each with 10 points. In his final match Fischer drew with Ivkov.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Cincinnati Enquirer, Cincinnati, Ohio, Friday, April 10, 1959 - Page 55

Fischer Stays In Title Hunt
MAR DEL PLATA, Argentina, April 9 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, 16-year-old Brooklyn schoolboy, won again last night in the Argentine International Chess Tournament and remains one of four title contenders with only one round of play remaining.
Fischer defeated Jacobo Bolbochan of Argentina in 56 moves. His last foe is Borislav Ivkov of Yugoslavia. The two are tied for second place at 9½ points behind Ludek Pachman, international grand master from Czechoslovakia, who has 10 points.
Miguel Najdorf of Argentina is fourth with none points plus one adjourned game which will be finished later. Najdorf and Pachman are opponents in the final round.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, April 11, 1959 - Page 18

Najdorf Record In Chess Studied
Argentine Is Only Player at Mar del Plata to Finish With No Setbacks

Of the fifteen players in the international chess masters tournament at Mar del Plata, Argentina, Miguel Najdorf of Buenos Aires, who shared first place with Ludek Pachman of Czechoslovakia, was the only one who did not lose a game. His score was 10½—3½.
Two defeats in the first part of the tournament prevented the 16-year-old Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn from finishing higher than a tie for third at 10—4 with Boris Ivkov of Yugoslavia, a former world junior champion.
Following are scores of two games played by Fisher:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, April 12, 1959 - Page 73

Fischer Advances In Argentine Chess
Bobby Fischer, brilliant young American chess champion, is making a bid for victory after a poor start in the international master tournament at Mar del Plata, Argentine. Winning five of his last six games, Fischer has advanced to fourth place with a 7-4 score.
Miguel Najdorf of Buenos Aires is alone in first place with a tally of 8-3. Second and third places are shared by Boris Ivkov of Yugoslavia and Ludek Pachman of Czechoslovakia, each having 7½-3½.
Rene Letelier of Chile and Hector Rosetto of Argentina are close to the leaders, with 6½-4½. Three rounds remain to be completed.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Thursday, April 16, 1959 - Page 7

Mar del Plata tournament
Bobby Fischer, the 16-year-old American champion, tied for third prize with Ivkov (Yugoslavia) in the annual tournament at Mar del Plata, Argentina. He was half a point behind Najdorf (Argentina) and Pachman (Czechoslovakia). In view of Fischer's limited international experience, this result marks him once more at a threat to the Russian world title contenders.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, April 19, 1959 - Page 67

Najdorf, Pachman Tie In Argentina
“…Two defeats in the early rounds of the tournament prevented United States chess champion Bobby Fischer from finishing higher than a tie for third at 10-4 with Boris Ivkov of Yugoslavia.
Fischer, 15-year-old Brooklyn boy who took time off from school to participate, lost to Pachman and to Rene Letelier of Chile. In the latter game, published below, Fischer started out well, gaining a pawn through a sharp sacrificial combination. But the game drifted into a drawn ending. Evidently not satisfied with this conclusion, Fischer tried to win, miscalculated and surrendered a vital point.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa, California, Sunday, April 19, 1959 - Page 46

Gossip from Holland
(The following was taken from the Australian “Chess World,” so ably edited by C.J.S. Purdy.)

Writing in a Dutch paper, Donner speaks of the impossibility of making much personal contact with Bobby Fischer during the interzonal. He begrudged even the time off for meals, and after a last hurried bite would rush off to his room to analyze or to prepare an opening.
Donner adds, “But I do not see much possibility of his further advance.” That is absurd. When you get natural genius allied to an infinite capacity for working at the chosen art, you get an Alekhine—or a Fischer.

Natural Genius
When you get only the natural genius, or high talent, you get a Pomar. There is a chance that Fischer may undermine his health—but we don't think Donner meant that. To prophesy that Fischer will become world champion would be silly—but to prophesy (by implication) that he won't is ever sillier. It would appear that Fischer's chief obstacle is likely to be Tal, who is not only a genius but seems a very robust character, and is only seven years older.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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Des Moines Tribune, Des Moines, Iowa, Monday, April 20, 1959 - Page 9

Chess Star, 16, Balks--Money
SANTIAGO, CHILE (AP)—Bobby Fischer, 16-year-old U.S. chess ace, almost walked out of the Santiago international tournament Monday because he was interested in cash on the line, not trophies.
In fact, Bobby did quit for a short time, but was persuaded to reenter. But he's not happy.

“I came here with the understanding there would be $2,000 in cash prizes,” he complained. “But when I got here I found there would be $1,000 in cash and the rest in trophies and other stuff which wouldn't interest me.”
Dionisio Gajardo Gajardo of the Chilean Chess Federation was assigned to sooth the Brooklyn high school lad's feelings.

“He is very difficult to deal with,” Gajardo Gajardo sighed. “But I am sure it was just a case of misunderstanding. There are many other international players here and they are going to play in the tournament whether much money is involved or not.”

Bobby listened to Gajardo Gajardo's pleas and then scowled:

“Well, it looks like I'd just as well play. After all, I came here. But someone got things fouled up somewhere. When I was in Argentina for the Mar Del Plata tournament, I was told the prize money here would be $2,000.”

Other big names entered include Ludek Pachman of Czechoslovakia, Borislav Ivkov of Yugoslavia, Hermann Pilnik of Argentina, Raul Sanguinetti of Argentina, and Joao De Souza Mendes of Brazil.

Bobby's mother, Mrs. Regina Fischer, is along and she is solidly behind her offspring.

“It's different with some of those Iron Curtain players,” she pointed out. “They get paid by their governments. Bobby doesn't and this trip costs lots of money.”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, April 22, 1959 - Page 40

Fischer Plays Draw In Chess
Santiago, Chile, April 21 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, the 16-year-old United States champion from Brooklyn, and Agusto Sanchez of Colombia drew in forty-one moves in their opening match of an international chess tournament last night. The thirteen-round tournament will end May 6.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Wednesday, April 22, 1959 - Page 19

Fischer Draws
SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) — Bobby Fischer, 16-year-old U.S. champion from Brooklyn, and Agusto Sanchez of Colombia, drew in 41 moves in their opening match of an international chess tournament last night. The 13-round tournament will end May 6.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky, Wednesday, April 22, 1959 - Page 23

U.S. Chess Champ In Draw
Santiago, Chile, April 21 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, 16-year-old U.S. champion from Brooklyn, and Agusto Sanchez of Colombia, drew in 41 moves in their opening match of an International Chess Tournament Monday night. The 13-round tournament will end May 6.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, April 23, 1959 - Page 38

Fischer Has Advantage
Enjoys Edge Over Brazilian as Chess Match Adjourns

Santiago, Chile, April 22 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, the United States chess champion from Brooklyn, has played two matches so far without decision in the international tournament here.
The 16-year-old schoolboy's match with J. de Souza Mendes of Brazil last night was suspended after forty-one moves. Fischer held the superior position.
Fischer first match, with Augusto Sanches of Colombia, also was suspended after forty-one moves on Monday.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, April 23, 1959 - Page 23

Bobby Fischer Competing In Tourney at Santiago
After finishing second to Ludek Pachman, of Czechoslovakia, in the international chess tournament at Mar del Plata, Argentina, Bobby Fischer now is taking part in another international tourney at Santiago, Chile.
The 16-year-old U.S. champion hopes to reverse the decision Pachman scored over him at Mar del Plata, which was responsible for his failure to win that tournament. Other well known players competing at Santiago include Borislav Ivkov, of Yugoslavia; Hermann Pilnik and Raul Sanguinetti of Argentina, and Joao de Souza Mendes, of Brazil.
Fischer, whose first game at Santiago was adjourned, was reported earlier this week to have been on the verge of withdrawing from the tournament over a financial misunderstanding. The Brooklyn schoolboy was quoted as saying he went to Santiago under the impression there would be $2000 in cash prizes, but that when he got there he found there was only $1000 in cash, the rest being “in trophies and other stuff which wouldn't interest me.”
Disappointment over the small amount of cash almost caused Bobby to return home, but he decided to play.
This may make it sound as if our youthful champion is interested mainly in whatever financial rewards he can get out of chess (which in the past, in this country, have been pitifully small for any of our stars). But his mother, Mrs. Regina Fischer, who is accompanying him on his South American trip, points out that while the Iron Curtain stars and some from other countries get subsidized by their governments, Bobby doesn't — “and this trip costs lots of money.” It is a legitimate argument. Bobby and his family are far from rich. The amount of money he can pick up in a tournament is important to them.

★ ★ ★

Following is one of Fischer's victories at Mar del Plata. In time trouble, he seemed to near defeat till he offered A. Redolfi of Argentina a bishop sacrifice which Redolfi unwisely accepted. The trap closed instantly.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Thursday, April 23, 1959 - Page 21

Fischer's Chess Match Suspended
SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) — Bobby Fischer, the U.S. champion from Brooklyn, has played two matches so far without decision in the International Chess Tournament here.
The 16-year-old schoolboy's match with J. de Souza Mendes of Brazil Tuesday night was suspended after 41 moves. Fischer held the superior position.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, April 24, 1959 - Page 31

Fischer Adjourns With Ivkov
Santiago, Chili, April 23 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, the 16-year-old United States chess champion from Brooklyn, played his third straight suspended game in an international tournament today. Fischer and Borislav Ivkov of Yugoslavia adjourned their match after forty-three moves. Raul Sanguinetti of Argentina and Carlos Jauregui of Chili remained tied for first place when they drew in twenty-three moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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The Orlando Sentinel, Orlando, Florida, Friday, April 24, 1959 - Page 40

Fischer Wins Again
SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) Bobby Fischer, 16-year-old U.S. chess champion from Brooklyn, played his third straight suspended game in the international chess tournament yesterday. Fischer and Borislav Ivkov of Yugoslavia suspended their match after 43 moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, April 25, 1959 - Page 18

Fischer Foe Has Edge
Sanguinetti Adjourns After 42 Moves in Santiago Chess

Santiago, Chile, April 24 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, the 16-year-old United States chess champion from Brooklyn, and Raul Sanguinetti, an Argentine master, suspended their match in the Arturo Alessandri Palma international tourney last night after forty-two moves.
It was the fourth straight game in which Fischer and an opponent failed to reached a decision in the tourney.
Sanguinetti had the superior position when the match was halted. At the end he sacrificed a rook to crown a queen.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Post-Standard, Syracuse, New York, Saturday, April 25, 1959 - Page 10

Chess Match Suspended
SANTIAGO, CHILE (AP) — Bobby Fischer, 16-year-old U.S. chess champion from Brooklyn, and Raul Sanguinetti, Argentine master, suspended their match in the Arturo Alessandri Palma international tourney Friday night after 42 moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Saturday, April 25, 1959 - Page 11

4th Fischer Match Suspended
SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) — Bobby Fischer, 16-year-old U.S. chess champion from Brooklyn, and Raul Sanguinetti, Argentine master, suspended their match in the Arturo Alessandri Palma International Tourney Thursday night after 42 moves. It was the fourth straight time that Fischer and an opponent have failed to reach a decision in the current tourney.
Sanguinetti had the superior position when the match was halted. At the end he sacrificed a rook to crown a queen.
The match may be completed today.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, April 26, 1959 - Page 264

Fischer Victor in Chess
Santiago, Chile, April 25 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, the 16-year-old chess player from Brooklyn, defeated M. Stekel of Chile in a tournament today.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, April 26, 1959 - Page 48

FISCHER IN SANTIAGO
Bobby Fischer, youthful U.S. chess champion, flew north after completing the tournament at Mar del Plata, Argentina, and stopped off for another international event at Santiago, Chile.
Here Fischer will be called upon to face some of the same opponents he encountered in the Argentine resort. On the list are Ludek Pachman of Czechoslovakia, Boris Ivkov of Yugoslavia, Joao de Souza Mendes of Brazil and Hermann Pilnik and Raul Sanguinetti of Argentina.
Fischer, who took time off from Erasmus High School in Brooklyn to develop his chess career, will continue busy for some months. He is due in Zurich, Switzerland for a tournament from May 19 to June 8. This will be part of a jubilee celebration in that city.
The major event for which Fischer is preparing is the candidates tournament to determine a challenger for the world chess championship. The American ace is one of eight grandmasters who will compete for that honor in Yugoslavia in a quadruple round-robin tournament which will last from Sept. 6 to Oct. 31.
Fischer played erratically in Mar del Plata, losing two of his first five games, then scoring seven wins and a draw of his last eight. The following games are from the event.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Poughkeepsie Journal, Poughkeepsie, New York, Sunday, April 26, 1959 - Page 4

“…Bobby Fischer, 16-year-old chess wizard from Brooklyn, wins his first match in the International tournament at Santiago, Chile…”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Monday, April 27, 1959 - Page 12

Fischer Wins Chess Match Over Stekel
SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) — Bobby Fischer 16-year-old chess wizard from Brooklyn, won his first match in the international tournament Saturday when he defeated M. Stekel of Chile.
The victory gave Fischer one point compared to three by Ludek Pachmann of Czechslovakia, the leader.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, April 30, 1959 - Page 42

Fischer Chess Victor
Defeats Letelier in Seventh Round of Santiago Play

Santiago, Chile, April 29 (AP)—Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, the 16-year-old United States champion, won his seventh round match in the Arturo Alessandri Palma international chess tournament today.
Fischer defeated the Chilean champion, Rene Letelier, who resigned after thirty-six moves.
Yugoslavia's Borislav Ivkov maintained his lead in the tournament by defeating Joao Mendes Souza of Brazil in forty-four moves.
Herman Pilnik of Argentina and Ludek Pachmann of Czechoslovakia drew after thirty-six moves; Augusto Sanchez of Colombia and Raul Sanguinetti of Argentina drew after thirty-four moves and Walter Adler and M. Steckel, both of Chile, suspended their match after forty-two moves.
The point standings:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, April 30, 1959 - Page 12

Bobby Fischer's first four games in the international tournament at Santiago, Chile, have all been adjourned. In at least one, against Raul Sanguinetti, of Argentina, Bobby seemed to have a losing position. Sanguinetti and Carlos Jauregui, of Chile, were tied for the tournament lead.

Following is one of Bobby Fischer's games from the Mar del Plata tournament:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Thursday, April 30, 1959 - Page 25

Fischer Defeats Chilean Champ
SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) — Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, N.Y., 16-year-old United States champion, won his seventh round match in the Arturo Alessandri Palma International Chess Tournament yesterday.
Young Fischer defeated the Chilean champion, Rene Letelier, who abandoned after 36 moves.
Yugoslavia's master Borislav Ivkov maintained his lead in the tournament by defeating Joao Mendes Souza of Brazil. Souza was forced to abandon after 44 moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Cincinnati Enquirer, Cincinnati, Ohio, Thursday, April 30, 1959 - Page 49

Wins Chess Match
SANTIAGO, Chile, April 29 (AP)—Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, N.Y., 16-year-old United States champion, won his seventh round match in the Arturo Alessandri Palma International Chess Tournament today. Young Fischer defeated the Chilean champion, Rene Letelier, who abandoned after 36 moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Thursday, April 30, 1959 - Page 74

Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, 16 year old United States champion, won his seventh round match in the Arturo Alessandri Palma International chess tournament in Santiago, Chile.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, May 01, 1959 - Page 26

Fischer Match Suspended
Santiago, Chile, April 30 (AP)—The chess match between Jose Salas Romo of Chile and Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn in the Arturo Alessandri Palma tourney last night was suspended and will be completed later. Fischer is in fourth place with 4 points.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Friday, May 01, 1959 - Page 24

Match Suspended
SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) — The chess match involving Jose Salas Romo of Chile and Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn in the Arturo Alessandri Palma tourney Wednesday night was suspended and will be completed later, perhaps this weekend. Fischer is in fourth place with 4 points.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, May 02, 1959 - Page 17

Chess Stars Adjourn
Fischer Halts Match Against Flores After 40 Moves

Santiago, Chile, May 1 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, the 16-year-old United States champion from Brooklyn adjourned his match with Roberto Flores of Chile in the Arturo Alessandri Palma international chess tournament today after forty moves.
It was the second match adjourned by Fischer, who remained tied with Flores for fourth place. Each player has four points. Fischer, in nine matches, has won four, lost three and adjourned two.
Borislav Ivkov, Yugoslavia's champion, defeated Raul Sanguinetti of Argentina in thirty-five moves. He holds a half-point lead with 6½ points. Behind him, each with 6 points, are Ludek Pachman of Czechoslovakia, and Sanguinetti.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Tennessean, Nashville, Tennessee, Saturday, May 02, 1959 - Page 13

Young U.S. Chess Ace Halts Match Holds Tie
SANTIAGO, Chile —(AP)—Bobby Fischer, 16-year-old U.S. champion from Brooklyn, N.Y., adjourned his match with Roberto Flores of Chile in the Arturo Alessandri Palma International Chess tournament yesterday after 40 moves.
It was the second match adjourned by Fischer, who remained tied with Flores for fourth place, each with four points. Fischer, in nine matches, has won four, lost three and adjourned two.
Borislav Ivkov, Yugoslavia's champion, defeated Raul Sanguinetti of Argentina in 35 moves and holds a half-point lead with 6½ points. Behind him, each with six points, are Ludek Pachman of Czechoslovakia and Sanguinetti.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Express and News, San Antonio, Texas, Saturday, May 02, 1959 - Page 57

Miguel Najdorf and L. Pachman shared top honors at the recently completed Argentinian chess tournament. A tie was registered for third and fourth positions between Boris Ivkov and the U.S.A.'s own Bobby Fischer, followed by a dozen strong South American masters.
A good show for Fischer, who started off badly with two losses in the early rounds. This result will place more followers in Fischer's camp who will be eager to cheer him on in his trial by fire, the World Candidates' Tournament.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, May 03, 1959 - Page 239

Chilean Beats Fischer
U.S. Chess Champion Bows to Juaregui in 40 Moves

Santiago, Chile, May 2 (AP)—Carlos Jauregui of Chile defeated Bobby Fischer, 16-year-old United States champion from Brooklyn, on the fortieth move of their game in the international chess tournament last night.
It was Fischer's second loss in ten games. He has won four. Four have been adjourned.
Borislav Ivkov, champion of Yugoslavia, held the tournament lead and remained unbeaten when he defeated Robert Stekel of Chile in thirty-five moves today. Ivkov has won three games and drawn three.
Ludek Pachmann of Czechoslovakia is second, Raul Sanguinetti of Argentina third, and Fischer, Jauregui, Roberto Flores of Chile and Herman Pilnik of Argentina tied for fourth.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky, Sunday, May 03, 1959 - Page 52

“We expect to have a strong field which will add to the interest of the tournament. The last here attracted such masters as Bobby Fischer, William Lombardy, Nicholas Rossolino, and Hans Berliner.”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, May 04, 1959 - Page 45

Fischer Wins, Draws
Beats Romo and Splits Point With Flores in Chess

Santiago, Chile, May 3 (AP) — Bobby Fischer, the United States' 16-year-old chess champion, won one game and tied another last night in the tournament here.
The Brooklyn youth defeated Julio Salas Romo of Chile and split a point with Rodrigo Flores of Chile on the sixty-second move.
Herman Pilnik of Argentina moved into contention by scoring two victories. He defeated Rene Latelier of Chile and Robert Stekel of Chile. Both were adjourned games.
Pilnik is now tied for fourth place with 6 points. Borislav Ivkov of Yugoslavia leads with 7½. Fischer is in fifth place with 5½.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

This article also appears in,

Tampa Bay Times, St. Petersburg, Florida, Monday, May 04, 1959 - Page 40

Fischer Defeats Romo In Chile
SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) — Bobby Fischer, the United States' 16-year-old chess master, won one game and tied another Saturday night in the International Chess Tournament here.
The Brooklyn prodigy defeated Julio Salas Romo of Chile and tied with Rodrigo Flores of Chile on the 62nd move.
Herman Pilnik of Argentina moved into contention by scoring two successive victories. He won over Rene Letelier of Chile and Robert Stekel of Chile. Both were suspended games.
Pilnik is now tied for fourth place with 6 points. Borislav Ivkov of Yugoslavia leads with 7½. Fischer is in fifth place with 5½.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Salt Lake Tribune, Salt Lake City, Utah, Wednesday, May 06, 1959 - Page 50

Keeps Chess Lead.
SANTIAGO, CHILE, May 5 (AP)—Borislav Ivkov of Yugoslavia, maintained his lead Tuesday in the Arturo Alessandri Palma international chess tourney by a drew with second place Ludek Pachman of Czechoslovakia. The match lasted only 13 moves and is the shortest in the tournament. Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, the United States champion, was idle Tuesday. He is sixth in the 13-man field after 10 rounds of play.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, May 08, 1959 - Page 36

Chess Ends In Tie
Ivkov, Pachman Share First Place in Chile Tourney

Santiago, Chile, May 7 (AP)—Borislav Ivkov of Yugoslavia and Ludek Pachman of Czechoslovakia tied for first place in the Arturo Alessandri Palma international chess tournament, which ended last night.
Each won seven games, tied four and lost one.
Herman Pilnik of Argentina finished third while the United States champion, Bobby Fischer was tied for fourth with five games won, five tied and two lost.
In the deadlock with Fischer were Argentina's Raul Sanquinetti and Augusto Sanchez of Colombia. Fischer closed the tourney by defeating Walter Ader of Chile in thirty-six moves.
Pilnik won six games, tied four and lost two.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, May 10, 1959 - Page 75

SANTIAGO TOURNAMENT
After six rounds of the international masters tournament at Santiago, Chile, Ludek Pachman of Czechoslovakia is leading with 4½-½ and one game adjourned. Boris Ivkov of Yugoslavia and Raul Sanguinetti of Argentina are tied at 4½-1½
U.S. Champion Bobby Fischer, 16-year-old Brooklyn schoolboy, again started poorly, as he did in the recent Mar del Plata tournament. Fischer lost to the three leaders and won three games for an even score. He is tied with R. Flores and C. Jauregui of Chile.
Six rounds remain to be completed. Following are games from the event.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Capital Journal, Salem, Oregon, Thursday, May 14, 1959 - Page 4

A Smile or Two
Illusion shattering, that's what it is.
We had been under the impression that the world's chess wizards thought of nothing but Reti's opening, Falkbeer's counter gambit, Giocco's piano, higher mathematics and perfect games of the past masters, never of such mundane things as money.
Then came the shocker from Chile. Bobby Fischer, 16, has caused a stir in the Santiago International Tournament. He kicked when he found awards in the meet include only one thousand dollars in cash plus “trophies and other stuff” in which he proclaimed no interest.
Bobby is an American boy, of course.—Miami Herald.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, May 17, 1959 - Page 247

Fischer To Play In Zurich Chess
Rest Expected to Help U.S. Champion Regain Form After Santiago Loss

In spite of his disappointing showing at Santiago, Chile, Bobby Fischer, chess champion of the United States, is expected to be in top form again after a much-needed rest in the West Indies.
He is due in Zurich, Switzerland, on Tuesday to play in the Swiss international jubilee tournament until June 8. There he will encounter two of the most powerful Soviet grand masters—Vassily Smyslov and Paul Keres—in the field of sixteen. Fischer has been anxious to play these two Russians ever since the rank of grand master was bestowed upon him by the International Chess Federation.
At Santiago, Fischer suffered four losses. He cannot afford to drop that number of points and rank as high at Zurich as he did at Portoroz, Mar del Plata, or the two contests for the United States championship, both of which he won.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, May 17, 1959 - Page 70

Santiago Tournament
The latest report from the international masters tournament at Santiago, Chile, had Ludek Pachman of Czechoslovakia take the lead when he defeated Raul Sanguinetti of Argentina. His closest rival, Boris Ivkov of Yugoslavia, lost in the semifinal round to Rene Letelier of Chile.
Bobby Fischer, U.S. Champion, was not in good form and suffered four losses to Pachman, Ivkov, Sanguinetti and Carlos Jauregui of Chile. Following is one of Bobby's victories against B. Stekel of Chile:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, May 20, 1959 - Page 45

Fischer Adjourns In Weak Position
U.S. Chess Champion Faces Swiss at Zurich—Gligoric and Donner Triumph

Only two decisions in eight games of the Jubilee international chess masters tournament were registered in the opening round in Zurich, according to a report received last night through Swiss news sources.
The two winners were Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia and Hein Donner of the Netherlands. Six other games were adjourned.
Bobby Fischer, United States champion, experienced rough handling on the black side of a Sicilian defense that he set up against Edgar Walther, one of the six Swiss competitors. The 16-year-old American was kept on the defensive throughout, but lost two pawns. His outlook upon resumption is not encouraging.
Paul Keres, one of the two Russians engaged, played the black side of a Ruy Lopez. He had the superior position against Max Blau of Switzerland after forty-one moves. The other Soviet representative, Mikhail Tal, went astray against Edwin Bhend of Switzerland in undertaking a doubtful sacrifice. After forty-two moves, the Russian adjourned in a precarious ending.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Wednesday, May 20, 1959 - Page 18

Match Adjourned
ZURICH, Switzerland (AP)—Bobby Fischer, 16-year-old American chess champion from Brooklyn, and Edgar Walther of Switzerland adjourned their first round game in the International Chess Tournament here yesterday.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, May 21, 1959 - Page 38

Fischer Rallies in Chess Match Before 2d Adjournment at Zurich
Bobby Fischer, the United States champion, held his own for fifty-seven moves and was still going strong when a second adjournment was taken yesterday in his first-round match of the Jubilee chess tournament, according to a report received from Zurich.
Being two clear pawns behind after forty-two moves in his match with Edgar Walther of Switzerland, the 16-year-old Brooklyn schoolboy had a real problem on his hands. However, he not only held his opponent at bay but also reached a position in which he was regarded as having a chance for a draw.

Paired in the second round with Bhend, Fischer played to another adjournment in forty-one moves. Fischer, with the white pieces against a Sicilian defense, captured a pawn and reached a rook ending, in which he sealed his move. Bhend was left with a slight chance to draw.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Thursday, May 21, 1959 - Page 33

Fischer's Chess Match Adjourned
ZURICH (AP)—Bobby Fischer of New York remained pointless in the international chess tournament yesterday after adjourning his match with Edwin Bhend of Switzerland.
Tied for the lead after two rounds with 1½ points each were Gedeon Barcza of Hungary, Andreas Dueckstein of Austria, Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia, and Paul Keres of Russia.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, May 22, 1959 - Page 22

Fischer, Gligoric Share Chess Lead
U.S. Champion Scores Twice and Gains Draw on Third Day of Zurich Tourney

A splendid recovery from an unpromising beginning enabled the United States chess champion, Bobby Fischer, to show his true form on the third day of the international jubilee tournament in Zurich, according to a report which reached here last night through Swiss news sources.
The 16-year-old Erasmus Hall High School, Brooklyn, student cleared up three games, winning two and drawing one. He now is tied for the lead with Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia, with a score of 2½—½.
Fischer, playing an adjourned game with Edgar Walther of Switzerland, drew after 67 moves. Walther's advantage of two pawns was neutralized by the fact that there were bishops commanding squares of different colors on the board.
Next Fischer accepted the resignation of Edwin Bhend of Switzerland, who was a pawn behind in an adjourned second-round match. Forty-one moves had been recorded.
Fischer's opponent in the third round was Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland against whom the American set up a King's Indian defense. The Icelander, facing two advanced pawns and pressed for time, resigned after 40 moves.
Gligoric won brilliantly in 29 moves from Dr. Erwin Nievergelt of Switzerland, who resorted to a Sicilian defense.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

This article also appears in,

The Baltimore Sun, Baltimore, Maryland, Friday, May 22, 1959 - Page 22

Fischer Leads In Chess
Zurich, Switzerland, May 21 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, Brooklyn teenager, and Svetozar Gligoric, of Yugoslavia, took the lead in the International Chess Tournament tonight with a ½ point margin over Russia's Mikhail Tal.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Tennessean, Nashville, Tennessee, Friday, May 22, 1959 - Page 44

Brooklyn Chess Ace Tied In International Meet
ZURICH, Switzerland — (AP) — Bobby Fischer, Brooklyn teen-ager and Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia took the lead in the International chess tournament last night with ½ point margin over Russia's Mikhail Tal.
Fischer, U.S. champion, beat Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland after 40 moves. Gligoric defeated Erwin Nievergelt of Switzerland after 29 moves. Tal beat Ben Larsen of Denmark in 41 moves.
Earlier Fischer tied his twice-postponed first round match against Edgar Walther, and won his second-round match with Edwin Bhend when the Swiss abandoned soon after the resumption of play.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, May 23, 1959 - Page 21

Olafsson Draws In Zurich Chess
Shares Point With Walther in Adjourned Game After Ten Hours of Play

Six adjourned games, completing three rounds of the jubilee international chess masters tournament in Zurich, were finished yesterday, according to a report received from Switzerland.
The highlight of the session was a draw lasting, in all, ten hours between Edgar Walther of Switzerland and Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland. The Icelander had a knight opposed to a bishop in the ending, wherein neither could prevail.
Each had a score of 1½—1½. Tied at 2—1 were two Russians, Paul Keres and Mikhail Tal; Gedeon Barcza of Hungary, Dieter Keller of Switzerland and Wolfgang Unzicker of West Germany.
Bobby Fischer, United States, and Svetozar Gligoric, Yugoslavia, each 2½—½, remained deadlocked for first.
The results of the adjourned games:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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The News, Frederick, Maryland, Saturday, May 23, 1959 - Page 3

Fischer Leads At Chess
Zurich, Switzerland (AP) — Bobby Fischer, U.S. national champion from Brooklyn took a clear lead in the International Chess Tournament here Saturday night when he beat Josef Kupper of Switzerland in a fourth round game.
Fischer has 3½ points in the standing. His leading rivals, Paul Keres and Mikhail Tal of Russia have three each and Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia has two.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, May 24, 1959 - Page 256

Fischer Defeats Kupper In Zurich
U.S. Star Gains Undisputed Possession of 1st Place in Chess Tournament

Bobby Fischer, the 16-year-old United States chess champion, defeated Josef Kupper of Switzerland in twenty-five moves to gain undisputed possession of first place in the jubilee international masters tournament at Zurich, according to a report from Swiss news sources last night.
The talented young Erasmus Hall High School student devised a fine combination against the Sicilian defense set up by his opponent. Fischer sacrificed at his twentieth turn and, give moves later, forced Kupper's resignation. The Brooklyn youth now has a 3½-½ total.
Fischer was helped to the top by Paul Keres of the Soviet Union who defeated Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia in 38 moves of a Ruy Lopez.
Gligoric, who had been tied with Fischer, dropped to fourth place in the standing.
Keres tied at 3-1 for second place with Mikhail Tal of the Soviet Union, Tal, on the black side of a Sicilian defense, won in 36 moves from Wolfgang Unzicker of West Germany.
The only other fourth-round victor was Hein Donner of the Netherlands, who won a pawn from Dr. Erwin Nievergelt, Switzerland and scored in 38 moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, May 24, 1959 - Page 31

Interzonal Contest
A contest prior to the World's Championship has already started in Zurich, Switzerland. Ten players from 16 countries will play. The United States entry is Bobby Fischer, whose first encounter was a Swedish player.

Bobby Fischer's Games
Another book by the same publishers, selling for $2.95. There are 34 games in the book, 13 from the U.S. Championship Tournament in 1957-1958. Also the prize-winning game from the Rosenwald Trophy Tournament; then Fischer's 20 games played in the Interzonal Tournament last year in Portoroz.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Oakland Tribune, Oakland, California, Sunday, May 24, 1959 - Page 24

U.S. Youth Takes Chess Tourney Lead
Zurich, Switzerland, May 23—(UPI)—Bobby Fischer, at 16 the youngest grand master in the world and the youngest participant in the International Chess tournament here, took the lead after the fourth round here tonight.
The young American defeated Switzerland's Josef Kupper in only 25 moves to total 3½ points in four rounds.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, May 25, 1959 - Page 39

Blau Holds Fischer To Draw At Zurich
The United States champion, Bobby Fischer, drew last night in the fifth round of the Jubilee chess tournament in Zurich with Max Blau, oldest of the six Swiss competitors, in twenty-three moves, according to a report received here through Swiss news sources.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Morning Herald, Hagerstown, Maryland, Monday, May 25, 1959 - Page 17

Bobby Fischer In Chess Lead
ZURICH, Switzerland (AP) — Bobby Fischer, U.S. national champion from Brooklyn took a clear lead in the International Chess Tournament here Saturday night when he beat Josef Kupper of Switzerland in a fourth round game.
Fischer has 3½ points in the standing. His leading rivals, Paul Keres and Mikhail Tal of Russia have three each and Svetozar Gilgoric of Yugoslavia has two.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, May 26, 1959 - Page 42

Kupper and Larsen Play Draw In Chess
Five rounds of the Jubilee international chess masters tournament in Zurich were completed yesterday. The only adjourned game pending, between Josef Kupper of Switzerland and Bent Larsen of Denmark, was drawn, according to a report received through Swiss news sources.
Kupper had a slight advantage in position at adjournment, but Larsen succeeded in equalizing.

The following is the score of Fischer's second game, in which he defeated Edwin Bhend of Switzerland:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Tuesday, May 26, 1959 - Page 17

Strictly Personal
Chess the Most Underpaid Intellectual Profession
By Sydney Harris

LITTLE BOBBY Fischer, the 16-year-old chess champion, nearly walked out of an international tournament in Chile last month, when he learned that the prize money had been cut in half. “More trophies don't interest me,” he grunted.
If Bobby had read a few histories of the royal game, he would have been neither disappointed nor surprised. Chess is probably the most underpaid intellectual profession known to man, and the total annual earnings of the greatest masters wouldn't keep a Hollywood starlet in brassieres.

In the melancholy history of chess, most masters have died in poverty, Steinitz, the finest player of the 19th century, ended his life as a charity case. The man who took the crown away from him, Emmanuel Lasker, was so embittered by his meager chess earnings that, in 1930's, he applied to Ely Culbertson for a diploma as a bridge teacher.

AND THE most brilliant player of our time, Alekhine, spent his declining years in playing games for coffee and cigaret money in seedy, sour-smelling clubs.

Only two world's champion's within memory have been able to live with a modicum of prosperity. Capablanca was at an early age given a diplomatic post by his Cuban government, for which he did little except play chess and build up nebulous “good will” for his country.

And in Russia, Botvinnik for years was given a handsome government salary as an engineer, although most of his engineering was performed over the chess-board.

ONE REASON for Russia's latter-day pre-eminence in chess is that it supports its fine players the way we support baseball and football figures, who are not supposed to do anything but contribute to the greater glory of the sport.

Most of the first-rate American players have been so busy scrounging for a living that they have had neither the time nor the energy to prepare fully for championship tournaments. The Russians beat us not by brains, but by subsidy.

I hope little Bobby has more sense than to try to make a career out of chess in this country. It simply cannot be done. Americans look upon chess as a freakish activity, not deserving the awesome respect we accord to baseball, hockey, football and six-day bike races. We are willing to pay anything but a display of brains.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, May 27, 1959 - Page 46

Keres, Tal Draw In Zurich Chess
Soviet Union Players Stay in Lead—Fischer and Larsen Adjourn Game

Bobby Fischer, the 16-year-old United States chess champion, played to an adjournment in forty-two moves with Bent Larsen of Denmark in the jubilee tournament at Zurich, Switzerland, yesterday.
Paul Keres and Mikhail Tal, the two Soviet Union grandmasters, who had been tied with the Brooklyn student for first-place, met in another match and drew in twenty-two moves.
As each of the two Soviet Union players gained half a point, they remained at the top of the standing with 4½—1½ scores. Fischer, at 4—1, is tied with Gedeon Barcza of Hungary.
Fischer, who played white against the Sicilian defense, emerged with two bishops opposed to a couple of knights. when they adjourned, the prospects of a draw loomed.
Barcza had the black side of a Reti opening with Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland who, after forty-one moves, had a slightly favorable position.
Keres played the English opening against, Tal, and they agreed to divide a point after twenty-two moves.
The two sixth-round winners were Wolfgang Unzicker of West Germany, who sacrificed a knight to get the upper hand, and Andreas Duckstein of Austria, whose French defense yielded him two pawns.

Fischer Baffles Rivals
The scores of two games won by Fischer at Zurich were received yesterday. Against Josef Kupper of Switzerland, the Brooklyn youth offered the sacrifice of a bishop for a pawn to gain access to the king, forcing Kupper to resign. Against Olafsson he advanced a couple of connected passed pawns to capture a knight. Pressed for time, Olafsson resigned.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Reno Gazette-Journal, Reno, Nevada, Wednesday, May 27, 1959 - Page 35

Chess Whiz Kid Adjourns Match

Zurich, May 27. (AP)—Bobby Fischer of New York, top threat to the two Russians leaders, adjourned his match against Denmark's Bent Larsen after 42 moves in the International Chess Tournament.
The Russians, Paul Keres and Mikhail Tal, tied after 23 moves in the sixth round and remain tied for the overall lead with 4½ points each.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, May 28, 1959 - Page 38

Fischer Is Victor In Zurich Chess
Turns Back Duckstein in 22 Moves—Tal Tops Keller and Leads in Tourney

Bobby Fischer, the United States chess champion, defeated Andreas Duckstein of Austria in 22 moves in the seventh round of the jubilee tournament in Zurich, according to a report received through Swiss news sources last night. The 16-year-old Brooklyn schoolboy against resorted to the Sicilian defense, winning a pawn and the exchange.
Earlier, Fischer had a second session with Bent Larsen of Denmark, adjourned from the sixth round, but another adjournment was taken after 59 moves.
Fischer, with a score of 5—1, now is second to Mikhail Tal of the Soviet Union with 5½—1½. Tal defeated Dieter Keller of Switzerland in 34 moves.
Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia gained 1½ points to tie Paul Keres of the Soviet Union for third at 5—2.

Details of the fifth-round game drawn by Fischer against Max Blau of Switzerland in 23 moves were received yesterday and showed the youth's opponent versed in the intricacies of the Sicilian defense. The play was reduced to a queen and bishop on each side, making further efforts superflouous.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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The Austin Daily Herald, Austin, Minnesota, Thursday, May 28, 1959 - Page 10

Chess Winner
Zurich (AP)—Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn defeated Andreas Dueckstein of Austria after 27 moves Wednesday in the seventh round of the International Chess tournament.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Thursday, May 28, 1959 - Page 4

Zurich tournament
One of the most important tournaments of the year, involving five of the eight world title contenders, is now in progress in Zurich. After three rounds, the 16-year-old American champion Bobby Fischer shares the lead with Gligoric (Yugoslavia) with 2½, followed by Barcza (Hungary), Keller (Switzerland), Unzicker (Germany), and Keres and Tal (Russia)…

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, May 29, 1959 - Page 20

Fischer Adjourns Two Chess Games
Puts Off Tests With Larsen and Unzicker—Tal Beats Walther at Zurich

Bobby Fischer, 16-year-old United States chess champion yesterday continued his bid for top honors in the jubilee international tournament in Zurich. He adjourned two games and remained in second place, according to a report from Switzerland.
Mikhail Tal of the Soviet Union defeated Edgar Walther of Switzerland and stayed in first place with 6½—1½.
Fischer, 5—1, had a third session in his sixth-round game with Bent Larsen of Denmark and adjourned after eighty-one moves when the Brooklyn youth refused a draw offered by Larsen.
Next, Fischer opposed Wolfgang Unzicker of West Germany in the eighth round and adopted his favorite Ruy Lopez.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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Casper Star-Tribune, Casper, Wyoming, Friday, May 29, 1959 - Page 11

Bobby Fischer at Work: He speaks only chess.
16-Year-Old Chess Champ Is Typical Teenage Type
By Ward Cannel
NEA Staff Correspondent
NEW YORK (NEA)— Despite warnings from writers, photographers, publicists, TV personnel, editors, publishers, tourists and just plain folks who said it couldn't be done, I have successfully seen and talked to Bobby Fischer.
And so I can report that Bobby is a typical American 16-year-old kid with typical teen-aged needs and typical porridge crumbs on his typical sweater. It is only by Providence that he happens to be the U.S. Chess Champion, and the youngest International Grandmaster of chess of all time.
Well, you can imagine what it is to be a teen-ager, when life's uncertainties begin to loom over you, and find yourself matching strategy against men two and three times your age — and beating them at it.
In the first place, it's a terrible strain on a typical gangling kid. One false move and you can knock all those little chess pieces on the floor.
And in the second place, it's an unfair attack on your sense of security, having all those full-grown players trying to outwit you.
It's the kind of thing that turns other, weaker kids into hostile delinquents or juvenile rebels. And Bobby would be the first to admit it. But unfortunatley, he speaks only chess.
Unhappily, most recent efforts to reassure him have bogged down.
The U.S. State Department, for example, offered to send him to the Paris Exposition last year. But he turned them down with a flimsy excuse that there wasn't enough money in it for him.
South America has tried, too. And while they actually got him down there, it was all they could do to keep him feeling secure and not afraid that he would be done out of his prize money.
On his return, one of New York's most venerable chess clubs held a reception for him. But even they had missed the combination to his secret heart. he did not show up.
So, it has been left up to the newsmen and photographers to break through the boy's insecurity and tell him that he can trust in America because we care.
At one time or another, almost everybody has tried. But invariably, the formula has been wrong. And it would stagger your mind to total up the number of newsman-hours lost over chess games with people guaranteed to be “Bobby's best friend: they see each other every afternoon.”
“But who knows?” a magazine reporter shrugged at me. “You may be the lucky one. I came pretty close myself. I had an appointment to meet him at a big resort where he had been invited free of charge because he was a champion.
“He had left long before I got there, of course. But I did have the good luck to be allowed to take his suitcases back to the city with me.”
Well, what nobody knew was: There is a secret ritual you have to go through before you can see Bobby. It works this way:
You make an appointment with him through Simon and Schuster, the publishers of Bobby's “Games of Chess.” You arrive at the appointment time, and 45 minutes later an editor comes in and sets up a chess board.
“This one has a very interesting middle game,” the editor says, beginning to play chess with himself. “Bobby would find this one quite challenging.”
The editor, who admits readily he will never be as good at chess as Bobby, soon gets into real jeopardy with himself. But just at the crucial moment—85 minutes late—the young champion gangles into the room, assays the game, and wins handily.
Away from the chessboard, Bobby is quite liberal and does not care that you are there, or who you are, or what you want. But you can tell that deep down he is in desperate need of reassurance—15 or 20 lashes of it.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, May 30, 1959 - Page 13

Fischer Ties Tal For Lead In Chess
Brooklyn Youth Draws With Larsen in 92 Moves and Beats Unzicker in 66

Bobby Fischer gained 1½ points yesterday in the Jubilee international chess masters tournament, it was reported from Zurich, and tied Mikhail Tal of the Soviet Union for the lead at 6½—½.
The Brooklyn schoolboy drew with Bent Larsen, 24 years old, of Denmark in ninety-two moves. It was the fourth session of their sixth-round game. Fischer had declined a draw after eighty-one moves. Larsen declined at the eighty-ninth.
Fischer then resumed his eighth-round game with Wolfgang Unzicker of West Germany, who was a pawn behind. Fischer soon took another pawn and scored in sixty-six moves.
Paul Keres of the Soviet Union and Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia won adjourned games, tying at 6—2 for third place.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Baltimore Sun, Baltimore, Maryland, Saturday, May 30, 1959 - Page 12

Fischer Wins Match
Zurich, Switzerland, May 29 (AP)—Schoolboy Bobby Fischer, of Brooklyn, won one match today and drew in another to pull into a tie for first place in an international chess tournament.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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Pensacola News Journal, Pensacola, Florida, Saturday, May 30, 1959 - Page 11

Fischer Gains Tie In Chess Tourney
Zurich, Switzerland (AP) — Schoolboy Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn won one match Friday and drew in another to pull into a tie for first place in an international chess tournament.
The U.S. champion drew with Bent Larsen of Denmark and defeated Wolfgang Unzicker of Germany.
Fischer and Russian grand master Mikhail Tal each have 6½ points.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, May 31, 1959 - Page 193

Fischer Adjourns 9th-Round Match
He Holds Slight Edge Over Barcza After 42 Moves in Zurich Chess

Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, the United States chess champion, adjourned his ninth-round match in the jubilee international tournament in Zurich, according to a report reaching here last night through Swiss news sources.
His opponent in an English opening was Gedeon Barcza of Hungary, who had a slightly inferior position when the session ended after forty-two moves.
The positions of Fischer and Mikhail Tal of the Soviet Union, tied for the lead at 6½—1½, remained unchanged. Tal adjourned his game with Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland in a queen-and-rook ending after forty-one moves.
Likewise, Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia and Paul Keres of Russia continued in a tie for third place at 6—2. Both adjourned their ninth-round games.
Wolfgang Unzicker of West Germany defeated Dr. Erwin Nievergelt of Switzerland in twenty-nine moves and moved up to fifth place.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, May 31, 1959 - Page 21

“Taken from the book “Bobby Fischer's Games of Chess” and is entitled, “The Game of the Century” played in the Rosenwald Trophy Tournament in 1956. This was awarded first brilliancy prize.”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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Lansing State Journal, Lansing, Michigan, Sunday, May 31, 1959 - Page 24

TEEN ETIQUET
Tips From 15-Year-Old Champion
Keep Other Thoughts Away, Says Fischer

By Kitte Turmell
When you're playing chess—and other competitive games —you have to learn to keep all other thoughts out of your mind. That's a tip from Bobby Fischer, who recently became the youngest player ever to win the title “International Chess Grand Master.”.
Fifteen years old, and a junior at Erasmus Hall high school in Brooklyn, N.Y. Bobby has been described by the secretary of the Manhattan Chess club, one of the largest organizations of its kind in America, as the “most interesting chess personality in the world.”
Already United States champion, Bobby traveled to Yugoslavia to compete in an international tournament. By tuin for fifth place, he qualified for the next Challenger's Tournament—which, in turn, will decide who will meet the Soviet Union's Mikhail Botvinnik in 1960 for the world title.

FOLLOWS OWN ADVICE
Bobby, obviously, follows his own advice. Reporters covering the Yugoslavian tournament noted that in a difficult game he sits for hours hunched over the board. Although he often plays with speed and imagination, according to the experts, in one match he pondered for an hour and a half before making the move that saved him from defeat.
“You've got to concentrate on the game you're playing—not on anything else—not even the game you won or lost yesterday,” he declared.
“I feel upset if I lose a game—I don't like to lose. But I just try to play the next won to win. You can't let one defeat get you. Some players fall apart when defeated, but I know that if I'm still thinking about the game I lost yesterday, I'm going to lose today's game, too.”
Bobby is inclined to belittle his new title. All it means, he says, is that “you placed well in international competition.” In the old days, he adds, when there were only about five grand masters in the world, the title meant more than it does today, when there are perhaps 40. But others consider it unusual achievement for one his age.
Nowhere in the world are chess audiences quiet enough for Bobby. Watchers insist, he reports with some bitterness, on applauding at the end of a match, thereby disturbing other players who are still competing.
“In Europe nearly everyone plays chess—but especially in Yugoslavia, where it's almost a national game. They chased me for autographs the way Americans chase a baseball player.”
Bobby started his chess career at the age of six when his sister showed him the moves. By nine or 10 he was playing seriously. Anyone who is really interested can learn the game, he insists. All you need are books on the subject and an inexpensive chess set. No one who plays seriously uses an expensive or fancy set—they're too interested in the game to worry about possible damage, he says.
Where no chess clubs are available to teen-agers, experts suggest “chess by correspondence. Two of the largest organizations providing this are the Chess Review, at 134 W. 72 st., New York 23, N.Y. and the Correspondents' Chess League of America, 816 S. Cecelia st., Sioux City 6, Ia. Jack Straley Battell, executive editor of the Chess Review, reports that there are more first class teen-age players in the United States today than ever before.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, May 31, 1959 - Page 73

Fischer Tied For Lead In Zurich Tournament
Bobby Fischer, 16-year-old U.S. chess champion, is tied for first place with a score of 4-1 after five rounds of the Jubilee International Masters Tournament in Zurich, Switzerland, according to a report from the New York Times.
Sharing the top position are two Russian grandmasters Paul Keres and Mikhail Tal, and Gedeon Barcza of Hungary.
Fischer, with only two weeks' rest after competing in tournaments in Mar del Plata, Argentina and Santiago, Chile, experienced rough going in his first-round match against Edgar Walther, one of six Swiss competitors in the Zurich event.
At adjournment time Fischer had lost two pawns, with little prospect of recovery. But he battled on through three sessions and 67 moves, finally obtaining a draw. Opposite colored bishops helped neutralize the difference in pawns.
In the second round Fischer defeated Edwin Bhend of Switzerland, winning a pawn and reaching a winning rook ending. Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland was Fischer's opponent in the third round. Faced with two advanced pawns and pressed for time, Olafsson resigned after 40 moves.

Santiago Tourney
Boris Ivkov of Yugoslavia and Ludek Pachman of Czechoslovakia shared top honors with 9-3 scores in the recently completed masters tournament at Santiago, Chile. Herman Pilnik of Argentina was third with 8-4.
Bobby Fischer, with a total of 7½-4½, finished tied with August Sanchez of Colombia and Raul Sanguinetti of Argentina.
One of Fischer's better games at Santiago was against Rene Letelier of Chile, who had defeated the youngster at Mar del Plata. The game follows:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, June 01, 1959

Tal Wins Twice In Zurich Chess
Regains Lead at 8½-1½—Fischer Beats Nievergelt, Adjourns With Barcza

With two victories yesterday, Mikhail Tal of the Soviet Union again took the lead in the Jubilee international chess tournament at Zurich, according to a report received here.
The Russian won in sixty-four moves from Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland in a game adjourned from the ninth round. He then downed Max Blau of Switzerland in the tenth round, winning an interesting end-game in thirty-five moves. Tal's score is 8½—1½.
Meanwhile, 16-year-old Bobby Fischer, United States champion, adjourned a second time with Gedeon Barcza in the ninth round. After fifty-nine moves, Fischer still had a slightly favorable position in a rook ending, with three pawns on each side.
Fischer next took on Dr. Erwin Nievergelt of Switzerland in the tenth round and won on the white side of a Sicilian defense in forty-two moves. This left Fischer in second place with 7½—1½.
Paul Keres climbed into third place with 7½—2½ after a draw in sixty moves with Bent Larsen of Denmark in the ninth round and a defeat of Wolfgang Unzicker of West Germany in the tenth.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, June 02, 1959 - Page 43

Fischer Draws In 95-Move Game
Barcza of Hungary Repels U.S. Champion's Attacks in Zurich Chess

Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn was held to a draw by Gedeon Barcza of Hungary yesterday in the longest game so far in the Jubilee chess tournament, according to a report from Zurich.
For ninety-five moves the young United States champion attempted to pierce Barcza's defenses. They had resumed play in the adjourned ninth-round contest with a queen and three pawns each. Each lost two more pawns in the final session.
The game, the only one played, completed ten of the fifteen rounds. Fischer is second with a score of 8—2. Mikhail Tal of the Soviet Union leads at 8½—1½.
Details of the ninety-two-move draw between Fischer and Bent Larsen of Denmark in the sixth round follow:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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The Tampa Tribune Tampa, Florida Tuesday, June 02, 1959 - Page 22

Draw In Chess Match
Zurich, Switzerland, June 1. (AP)—Bobby Fischer, the U.S. champion from New York, today was held to a draw by Gedeon Barcza of Hungary after 96 moves in their twice adjourned match in an international chess tournament. Fischer dropped into second place, a half point behind Russian grand master Mikhail Tal who has eight and one-half points.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, June 03, 1959 - Page 42

Fischer Suffers First Chess Loss
U.S. Champion Is Beaten by Gligoric Who Ties Him for Second at Zurich

After surviving ten rounds without a loss, Bobby Fischer, the United States chess champion, met his first defeat yesterday in the eleventh round of the jubilee tournament at Zurich, according to Swiss news sources.
The 16-year-old Erasmus Hall High School star bowed to Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia on the black side of a Sicilian defense in thirty-nine moves.
The Brooklyn youth, a pawn down in the ending, was unable to recover. He missed a drawing line at the twenty-fourth move. Gligoric, at 8—3, joined Fischer in second place.
This left Mikhail Tal of the Soviet Union at the top of the standing with 8½—1½. Tal adjourned his game with Andreas Duckstein of Austria, who had the inferior position.
Paul Keres of the Soviet Union, fourth with 7½—2½, ran into a snag with Dr. Erwin Nievergelt of Switzerland, who was two pawns ahead at the time of adjournment.

The match in which Fischer defeated Andreas Duckstein of Austria in the seventh round was surprisingly brief, as shown in the score just received by air mail. The United States champion had the black side of a Sicilian defense and, after both had castled on the king's side, brought out his queen for effective maneuvering on both wings.
Fischer won a pawn and was on the point of winning the exchange when Duckstein saw fit to resign after twenty-two moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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Asbury Park Press Asbury Park, New Jersey Wednesday, June 03, 1959 - Page 18

Fischer Is Chess Victim
Zurich, Switzerland (AP)—Bobby Fischer, U.S. champion from New York, was defeated by Yugoslavia's Svetozar Gligoric after 39 moves Sicilian opening in the 11th round of the International Chess Tournament yesterday.
It was Fischer's first defeat in the 10-nation tournament and seriously impaired his chances of overtaking the leader, Russian Mikahil Tal.
Tal's game against Andreas Duecksteon of Austria was adjourned after 47 moves Nimyoindian Defense. But even if Tal loses this game, he will remain one-half point ahead of Fischer and Gligoric, who are tied for second place in the over-all standings.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, June 04, 1959 - Page 38

Tal Wins, Increases Zurich Chess Lead
Dr. Erwin Nievergelt of Switzerland defeated Dieter Keller of Switzerland, who overstepped the time limit and resigned after thirty-nine moves, in the twelfth round of the jubilee international chess tournament in Zurich, yesterday according to a report received here from Switzerland.
Bobby Fischer, United States champion, and Paul Keres of the Soviet Union played a Ruy Lopez for forty-one moves and adjourned in a rook and bishop ending.
Mikhail Tal of the Soviet Union likewise failed to reach a decision with Gedeon Barcza of Hungary. Svetozar Gligoric, Yugoslavia, had the better of the position with Hein Donner of the Netherlands.
In an earlier session three adjourned games from the eleventh round were decided. Tal defeated Andreas Duckstein, Austria, in 57 moves and increased his lead. Paul Keres, Russia, was held to a draw by Nievergelt, also in fifty-seven moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The News Journal Wilmington, Delaware Thursday, June 04, 1959 - Page 6

Fischer Eyes Second In Chess Tournament
Zurich, Switzerland, June 4 (AP).—Russian Grand Master Mikhail Tal was comfortably leading after the 12th round of the international chess tournament here today with young Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, N.Y. and Paul Keres of Russia still fighting for second place.
All games of the 12th round were finished this morning with the exception of the Fischer-Keres meeting which was again adjourned after 59 moves. Fischer, playing the Spanish opening seemed to have a slightly better position, but reliable predictions are almost impossible in chess.
Fischer and Keres were in third positions with 8 points each and one adjourned game. If the game ends in a draw they will both advance into second place with Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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Tampa Bay Times St. Petersburg, Florida Thursday, June 04, 1959 - Page 22

Tal Increases Chess Lead Over Fischer
Zurich, Switzerland (AP)—Russian grand master Mikhail Tal yesterday increased his lead over America's Bobby Fischer and Yugoslavia's Svetozar Gligoric as the International Chess Tournament went into its 12th round.
Tal beat Austria's Andreas Dueckstein after 57 moves in an adjourned 11th round game and now leads with 9½ points.
Russia's Paul Keres drew even with Fischer, Brooklyn teen-ager, and Gligoric after he tied with Switzerland's Erwin Nievergelt in another adjourned 11th round game. Keres, Fischer and Gligoric are in second place with eight points each.
Twelfth-round matches adjourned yesterday included those between Fischer and Keres, Gligoric and Hein Donner of the Netherlands, and Tal and Hungary's Gedeon Barcza.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Oakland Tribune Oakland, California Thursday, June 04, 1959 - Page 20

Russian Leading In Chess Tourney
Zurich, Switzerland, June 4 (AP) —Russian grand master Mikhail Tal was comfortably leading after the 12th round of the international chess tournament here today with young Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, N.Y. and Paul Keres of Russia still fighting for second place.
All games of the 12th round were finished this morning with the exception of the Fischer-Keres meeting which was again adjourned after 59 moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, June 05, 1959 - Page 23

Fischer Defeats Donner In Chess
Wins in 44 Moves at Zurich—Keres Keeps Pace by Overcoming Keller

Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, the 16-year-old United States chess champion, and Paul Keres of the Soviet Union were both winners in the thirteenth round of the jubilee tournament in Zurich, according to a report last night from Switzerland.
The rivals advanced from third to second in the standing with scores of 9—3 each, one (illegible) below Mikhail Tal of the Soviet Union with 10—2.
Fischer, adopting the King's Indian defense, defeated Hein Donner of the Netherlands in forty-four moves. The American won two pawns and exploited the minor positional advantage he obtained.
Keres brought off a neat combination, involving the sacrifice of a piece, against Dieter Keller of Switzerland. The latter played the Petroff defense and resigned after 38 moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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Asbury Park Press Asbury Park, New Jersey Friday, June 05, 1959 - Page 25

In Chess Tournament
Zurich, Switzerland (AP) — United States Champion Bobby Fischer of New York advanced within one point of the leading Mikhail Tal of Russia in the International Chess Tournament by defeating the Netherland's Hein Donner in 44 moves last night.
After 13 rounds, Fischer was tied with Paul Keres of Russia with nine points to 10 for Tal.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, June 06, 1959 - Page 17

2 Russians Beaten In Chess At Zurich
Both Soviet players suffered unexpected defeats in the Jubilee chess tournament yesterday, according to a report from Zurich, Switzerland.
Mikhail Tal was beaten by Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia. Bobby Fischer, the United States champion, defeated Paul Keres, and moved into a tie for first place with Tal at 10—3. Two of the fifteen rounds remain to be played.
The Fischer-Keres game had been adjourned twice from the twelfth round with the 16-year-old Brooklyn boy a pawn ahead. Fischer captured a second pawn and won in eighty-one moves.
Tal had the white side of a Ruy Lopez. He had adjourned in a position so unfavorable that he resigned after forty-two moves. Gligoric, at 9½—3½, took third place.

A passed pawn enabled Svetozar Gligoric to win his eleventh-round game with Bobby Fischer, according ot the score of the game, which arrived yesterday.
The score:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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Asbury Park Press Asbury Park, New Jersey Saturday, June 06, 1959 - Page 13

Fischer and Tal Tied in Chess
Zurich, Switzerland (AP) —Bobby Fischer, 16-year-old American chess champion from Brooklyn, tied Russian Grand Master Mikhail Tal for first place in the International Chess Tournament last night.
Fischer caught Tal by beating another Russian, Grand Master Paul Keres, after 81 moves in a game adjourned from the 12th round two days ago.
Tal was beaten by Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia in a game adjourned from the 13th round Thursday. Tal and Fischer each have 10 points.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Sunday, June 07, 1959 - Page 60

“There are two interesting chess books on the market now. One is the life and games of Emmanuel Lasker, the other is the games of chess Bobby Fischer has played.
No two grandmasters could be more different.
Bobby Fischer, now 16, was the youngest grandmaster of all time. Seeming to have no other interest, he's still going strong in his bid for the world championship.
Lasker, on the other hand, was a philosopher, mathematician, poet and, though he intensely disliked the game, was for 28 years (from 1894) the world's chess champion.
As different as the chess players are the books. Fischer's annotated by himself, is about his own meteoric chess career (May 1955 to May 1958): the games themselves with the author's comments at strategic moves. The book about Lasker is both a biography of his personal life and its relation to his life of chess, including more than 100 of his greatest games. Written by Dr. J. Hannak (in German) and translated by Albert Einstein, it is considered the standard work on Lasker. (Unfortunately there are an annoying number of typographical errors in the text).
Fischer is obviously a brilliant chess player; Lasker was brilliant in many ways. Readers primarily interested in modern chess motifs will want Fischer's book; those interested in the lives of the important and near-great men will want the book about Lasker. Both make valuable additions to chess libraries. — KC

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, June 07, 1959 - Page 252

Tal Tops Donner In Zurich Chess
Russian Takes Lead After 14 Rounds—Fischer Adjourns Game With Keller

Mikhail Tal, Soviet grandmaster at chess, was in first place yesterday after winning in twenty-eight moves from Hein Donner of the Netherlands in the fourteenth round of the Jubilee tournament in Zurich, according to a report from Switzerland. He broke a tie with Bobby Fischer, United States champion, who adjourned his game with Dieter Keller of Switzerland after forty-one moves.
Tal resorted to the Benoni Counter Gambit and captured a pawn. Donner found himself in difficulty and surrendered sooner than expected.
Fischer played his favorite Ruy Lopez against Keller. Fischer lost a pawn on the twenty-seventh move and another on the thirty-fourth.
Paul Keres of the Soviet Union on the black side of a Ruy Lopez, won the exchange from Edgar Walther of Switzerland, who gave in after forty-one moves. The added point gave third place in the standing to Keres, with Svetozar Gligoric, Yugoslavia, fourth. Gligoric, having an advantage, adjourned with Edwin Bhend of Switzerland.
Bent Larsen of Denmark and Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland were the other fourteenth-round winners.
Today's program will finish adjourned games and start the fifteenth and final round, in which Fischer and Tal are paired.

Zurich Scores Listed
The latest selection of scores received from Zurich includes the draw between the United States champion, Bobby Fischer and Gedeon Barcza of Hungary, which required ninety-five moves. It was the longest game of the tournament to date.
Also included is the struggle between Fischer and Wolfgang Unzicker of West Germany, which the Erasmus Hall High School student won after sixty-five moves. In addition, the full details of Fischer's defeat of Dr. Edwin Nievergelt of Switzerland are at hand.
The scores:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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Oakland Tribune Oakland, California Sunday, June 07, 1959 - Page 61

Russian Leader in Chess Tourney
Zurich, Switzerland, June 6—(AP)—Russian grand master Mikhail Tal took over the lead in the international chess tournament today when 16-year old Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, N.Y., adjourned his match.
Tal boosted his point total to 11 points when he defeated Hein Donner of the Netherlands in 29 moves. Fischer remained in second place with 10 points after adjourning his match with Dieter Keller of Switzerland.
The Fischer-Keller match with Keller in an advantageous position will be completed tomorrow before Fischer and Tal tangle in the final round.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, June 08, 1959 - Page 37

Tal and Fischer Draw At Zurich
Russian Clinches at Least Tie for Chess Honors—Gligoric in Contention

Zurich, Switzerland, June 7 (AP)—Bobby Fischer of New York and Mikhail Tal of the Soviet Union played to a draw in the fifteenth and last round of the international chess tournament tonight.
Tal, who led for most of the tournament, finished with 11½ points. Fischer, 16-year-old United States champion, wound up with 10½. Earlier, Dieter Keller of Switzerland beat Fischer in fifty-eight moves in an adjourned match.
Yugoslavia's Svetoza. Gligoric, with 10½ points, did not finish his game with Josef Kupper of Switzerland.
If he beats Kupper tomorrow, when adjourned games will be completed, he will share first place with Tal. If he loses he will share second place with Fischer. A draw will give him second place, undisputed.
Fischer's loss to Keller had been foreseen, according to a report received from Zurich Sunday night. Keller was two pawns ahead of his Brooklyn rival when the fourteenth-round contest was adjourned. He soon made that distinct advantage tell.
Gligoric won his fourteenth-round game with Edwin Bhend of Switzerland, without resuming play, in forty-two moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Reno Gazette-Journal Reno, Nevada Monday, June 08, 1959 - Page 16

Fischer Ties Russian Star
Zurich, Switzerland, June 8. (AP)—Bobby Fischer of New York and Russian Grand Master Mikhail Tal drew in their game in the 15th and last round of the international chess tournament Sunday.
Tal, who led for most of the tournament finished with a winning total of 11½ points. Fischer, 16-year-old U.S. champion, wound up with 10½.
But Yugoslavia's Svetozar Gligoric, who has accumulated 10½ points in 14 rounds did not finish his game against Josef Kupper of Switzerland.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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The Des Moines Register Des Moines, Iowa Monday, June 08, 1959 - Page 19

Fischer Loses
Zurich, Switzerland (AP)—Dieter Keller of Switzerland Sunday defeated Bobby Fischer, U.S. champion from New York, in chess. The upset dropped the 16-year-old Fischer to third in an international tournament.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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The Times Shreveport, Louisiana Monday, June 08, 1959 - Page 7

Fischer in Draw With Red Player
Zurich, Switzerland, June 7 (AP). Bobby Fischer of New York and Russian grand master Mikhail Tal drew in their game in the 15th and last round of the international chess tournament tonight.
Tal, who led for most of the tournament finished with a winning total of 11½ points. Fischer, 16-year-old U.S. champion, wound up with 10½.
But Yugoslavia's Svetozar Gligoric, who has accumulated 10½ points in 14 rounds did not finish his game against Josef Kupper of Switzerland.
If he beats Kupper tomorrow when adjourned games are completed he will share first place with Tal. If he loses he will share second place with the crew-cut American. A draw will give him second place.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, June 09, 1959 - Page 49

Tal, Soviet Union, Is Zurich Victor
Triumphs in Chess Tourney When Gligoric Is Held to Draw by Kupper

Mikhail Tal, a 23-year-old Latvian-born international grandmaster at chess representing the Soviet Union in the Jubilee tournament at Zurich, yesterday emerged as the winner of first prize, according to reports from Switzerland. Tal had a score of 11½—3½.
Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia, who had a chance to tie Tal, was held to a draw in fifty-five moves by Josef Kupper of Switzerland in their adjourned fifteenth-round game. This left Gligoric in the runner-up position a score of 11—4.
Paul Keres, the other representative of the Soviet Union, drew his adjourned game with Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland in fifty-eight moves and tied for third place, at 10½—4½, with Bobby Fischer, the United States champion. The 16-year-old Brooklyn youth had defeated Keres in eighty-one moves in the twelfth round.
Winners in other adjourned games played-off yesterday were Edwin Bhend and Dieter Keller of Switzerland, and Wolfgang Unzicker of West Germany, all with the white pieces.
The tournament formally wound up with the presentation of prizes at a reception in the Municipal Congress Building.
Fischer, whose resourceful play had made a deep impression, was warmly applauded. He won eight games, drew five and lost two.

The score of the game won by Fischer from Hein Donner of the Netherlands in the thirteenth round:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Asbury Park Press Asbury Park, New Jersey Tuesday, June 09, 1959 - Page 20

Russian Wins Chess Crown
Zurich, Switzerland (AP)—Russia's grand master Mikhail Tal became the winner of the International Chess Tournament yesterday when Yugoslavia's Svetorzar Gligoric failed to win his final game.
Gligoric tied with Swiss Josef Kupper after 55 moves in an adjourned game. This left him with only 11 points in the over-all final standings compared with Tal's 11½
Bobby Fischer of New York and Russia's Paul Keres tied for third place with 10½ points each.
Fischer, twice American champion will meet Tal, Gligoric and Keres again in Yugoslavia later this year. The winner of that tournament will be entitled to challenge Russia's world champion, Mikhail Botvinnik, in 1960.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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The Missoulian Missoula, Montana Tuesday, June 09, 1959 - Page 12

Wins Chess Tourney
Zurich, Switzerland (AP)—Russia's grandmaster Mikhail Tal became the winner of the International Chess Tournament Monday when Yugoslavia's Svetozar Gligoric failed to win his final game. Gligoric tied with Swiss Josef-Kupper after 55 moves in an adjourned game. This left him with only 11 points in the overall final standings compared with Tal's 11½. Bobby Fischer of New York and Russa's Paul Keres tied for third place with 10½ points each.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Guardian London, Greater London, England Thursday, June 11, 1959 - Page 7

The Ruy Lopez
“With both Fischer and Gligoric comparing well with the Russians, the possibility of the first non-Russian challenger since 1948 is improving.

Russian wins at Zurich
The Russian grandmaster Tal, aged 22, has just achieved another success by winning first prize at Zurich. He scored 11½ out of 15, ahead of Gligoric (Yugoslavia) 11, Fischer (United States) and Keres (Russia) 10½, Larsen (Denmark) and Unzicker (Germany) 9½. Bobby Fischer, aged 16, was level with Tal two rounds before the end but then fell back. Fischer beat Keres and drew with Tal, and now has the enviable record of a win and five draws in six games with Russian grandmasters.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Courier-Post Camden, New Jersey Thursday, June 11, 1959 - Page 21

Mikhail Tal, 23-year-old Latvian who has twice held the Soviet Union championship, captured the Jubilee tournament at Zurich, Switzerland, over a field of 15 others. His final score was 11½-3½. A close second at 11-4 was the Yugoslav grandmaster Svetozar Gligoric.
America's brilliant young champion Bobby Fischer finished in a tie with the veteran Paul Keres, of Russia, at 10½-4½. However, in their match in the 12th round the 16-year-old Bobby defeated Keres in 81 moves. Bobby's play during the tournament was spectacular and at the awarding of prizes he drew the biggest hand of any of the competitors. He had 8 victories, 5 draws and 2 defeats. One of his losses was to Gligoric and the other, which cost him dearly, was in the 14th round to Dieter Keller, of Switzerland, who finished 12th in the final standings.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, June 14, 1959 - Page 84

Tal Wins At Zurich; Fischer Is Third
Mikhail Tal, 23-year-old Latvian-born grandmaster representing the Soviet Union, won first prize in the Jubilee International Masters Tournament in Zurich, Switzerland, according to a report from the New York Times.
Tal finished with a score of 11½-3½. After losing in an early round to Edwin Bhend of Switzerland, Tal took command and was in the lead most of the way. But in the 13th round he was defeated by Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia.
At that point, Bobby Fischer, 16-year-old United States chess champion, moved up to tie for first with Tal, both having scores of 10-3. Gligoric was then third with 9½-3½ and Paul Keres of Russia, who had just lost an 81-move adjourned game to Fischer, was fourth with 9-4.
Came the last two rounds. Tal won handily against Hein Donner of the Netherlands and in his final game drew against Fischer. Gligoric, winning against Bhend in Round 14, could have tied for first prize with one more victory. But Josef Kupper of Switzerland held him to a draw. The final tally for Gligoric was 11-4, enough for second place.
Fischer, who had come through a series of arduous adjourned games, was evidently tired. He lost in the 14th round to Dieter Keller of Switzerland. The draw with Tal allowed Fischer to tie for third with Keres, with scores of 10½-4½.
Fischer's only other loss was to Gligoric. He won eight games and drew five. Keres lost but one, to Fischer, won seven and drew as many.
Following are the final standings and games from the tournament:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Courier-Post Camden, New Jersey Thursday, June 18, 1959 - Page 12

“In honor of the silver anniversary of the Log Cabin Chess Club, the U.S. Chess Federation will hold a seeded championship tournament for men and women there Aug. 7 to 23. … Players expected to take part include Bobby Fischer, 16-year-old national champion…”

There is some question at the moment about Fischer's plans for the summer. He is remaining in Zurich, Switzerland, for the time being after finishing third in the Jubilee Tournament there in which five of the international grandmasters took part who will play in the world's championship challengers' tourney in Yugoslavia next fall.
Bobby's mother prefers that he stay in Europe during the summer and he is much in demand there for exhibitions. Thus his return to the United States to play at West Orange is uncertain.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Express and News San Antonio, Texas Saturday, June 20, 1959 - Page 54

Championship Chess By Blake Stevens, Texas State Champion
Bobby Fischer, the 16-year-old chess genius, is in the middle of another important chess tournament.
After winning the U.S. Open, the U.S. Absolute, and qualifying in the Candidate's Tournament at Portoroz, Yugoslavia, he went to South America and tied for third, behind Najdorf and Pachman. This disappointed many of his followers! And Fischer only 16!
Already there is a sense of great expectations everytime he participates in a big tournament. The chess world has accepted the fact that Fischer is good, very good, and now it appears the adjectives will have to be more glowingly superlative.

Zurich
Fischer is restless. He finishes one tournament and is ready to move on to the next. On one occasion he completed a tournament, barely caught a plane in time to enter a following tournament.
Older players like a little rest in between, and some need it, as tournaments are trying, sometimes to the point of nervous exhaustion. This does not bother Fischer. In fact, at Zurich, he has played long games (against Larsen, 85 moves; against Barcza, 95), with what looks like a deliberate attempt to wear down his senior competition.
Since youth is a weapon more fitted to Fischer's hands than any other player, why not use it to full advantage? We know Bobby has patience and tenacity, but resiliency?
Resiliency is the ability to bounce back after a loss. In golf it is the ability to regain one's composure after a bad hole. Fischer has lost a few games in his major tournament career. (I can think of three), and his score after the loss was satisfactory so it can be assumed that he possesses this quality. He had a score of 8-2 at Zurich, but met Gligorich who defeated him.
Tal, that barracuda, is leading with 9½-1½, a phenomenal score when you consider he lost his first round game Tied with Fischer is Gligorich and Keres, followed by Larsen, Barcza, Olafsson, Unzicker, Donner, Bhend, (who beat Tal), Kupper, Keller, Walther, Duckstein, Blau, and Nievergelt. Four rounds remaining. Fischer is scheduled to play the Russian Grandmaster, Paul Keres, next. A tie for second or third would be a fine achievement. We will report the outcome soon.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Sunday Gazette-Mail Charleston, West Virginia Sunday, June 21, 1959 - Page 63

Young U.S. Chess Star Did Well
By Edward M. Foy
The United States' 16-year-old chess champion, Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, made a fine showing in the recently completed international tournament at Zurich, Switzerland, by finishing in a third-place tie.
One of the two Soviet Union representatives, Mikhail Tal, a Latvian, captured first prize in the 16-player field, scoring 11½ to 3½; one half point ahead of second-place Svetozar Gligoric, of Yugoslavia.
Young Fischer tied for third prize with the other member of the two-man Soviet contingent, the Estonian, Paul Keres. Both Fischer and Keres scored 10½ to 4½ but the American had the satisfaction of winning their individual game, in 31 moves in round twelve. And a tournament victory over Grandmaster Keres is quite an achievement — even for another grandmaster.
Larsen of Denmark, Unzicker of West Germany, and Barcza of Hungary tied for fifth position with 9½ to 5½ scores. Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland scored 8 to 7. The other eight contestants scored less than even in wing and losses.
Fischer's performance at Zurich was an improvement over his other two international appearances during the past couple of months. He scored 10 to 4 to tie for third place at Mar Del Plata in Argentina; and, slipping somewhat, dropped to a fifth-place tie with 7½ to 4½ at Santiago, Chile. Incidentally, Bobby is so popular in Yugoslavia, where he played in the inter-zonal tourney last year, that the Yugoslavs have named a chess club after him.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Express and News San Antonio, Texas Saturday, June 27, 1959 - Page 53

Bobby Fischer tied for third place at the Interzonal Tournament at Zurich, with Paul Keres of Russia, behind Tal of Russia (1st) and Gligoric from Hungary (2nd). Another fine feat for the 16-year-old Brooklyn boy.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Courier-Journal Louisville, Kentucky Sunday, June 28, 1959 - Page 35

Book by U.S. Champion Bobby Fischer Contains His Best Tournament Games
This seems to be the season for spawning chess books, and today we have another for review—a fledgling book by a fledgling player.
But this author, while a fledgling in years, is a giant in chess stature. He is 16-year-old Bobby Fischer, reigning American champion and the youngest international grandmaster of all time.
It is particularly gratifying, therefore, to report that the New York publishing firm of Simon and Schuster has now put into book form at $2.95, the first collection of celebrated tournament games played by young Fischer. There are 34 in all.
Most games are thoroughly analyzed by Bobby, and each annotation provides an insight into the kind of thinking that has thrust the American prodigy into the top echelon of his contemporaries and made him an international celebrity.
Included are the 13 games from the United States Championship Tournament of 1957-58 and the “Game of the Century” from the Third Rosenwald Trophy Tournament. In addition, the book carries Fischer's 20 games from the 1958 Portoroz Interzonal in which he played against the world's elite—among them Tal, Gligorich, Petrosyan, and Bronstein.
One objection to the selection of games: There are too many draws.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Express and News, San Antonio, Texas, Sunday, July 05, 1959 - Page 74

“At Zurich, Bobby Fischer played steady, cool chess, and always obtained equality in the opening, from the Black side, either in the Sicilian Defense (his game against Duckstein) or in the King's Indian Defense (as in today's game).
After attaining equality, he employed a clever strategem—he did nothing! And like all true mullets rising to the bait, his opponents tried to force the issue, counting on their experience to over-run this baby (Fischer is only 16).
This is the story behind many of the games in this tournament and to re-enforce my point, here is another example.

Precision play by the young aspirant to the chess throne.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky, Sunday, July 12, 1959 - Page 37

The King's Men: World Title Hope Seen In Fischer
By Merrill Dowden

Inasmuch as a crystal ball is not included in the equipage of this department, and I am not exactly proficient in palmistry or the reading of tea leaves, I usually shy away from prognosticating as one would the plague.
However, for this once I'm crawling to the very tip of a very long limb (leaving plenty of room for the saw behind) to predict:
1. That the United States will produce a world chess champion within the next decade.
2. That our champion will be one Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, who now has reached the ripe old age of 16.
Maybe that phrase, “next decade,” seems that I'm giving myself plenty of rope, but it must be remembered that more than a century has elapsed since we produced our first and only world champion, Paul Morphy.
Bobby, whose “Fischer's Games of Chess” was reviewed in this column a couple weeks ago, already has taken a long step toward the championship. He is the present United States titlist, and is generally regarded as the strongest player for his age in history.
Bobby lost no time in getting started to fame and fortune through the royal game. Born in Chicago on March 9, 1943, he learned the chess moves in 1949 from his sister Joan, then 11. “She often bought different games at a candy store,”Bobby writes, “and one day happened to buy a chess set. We figured out the moves from the directions that came with the set.
And Bobby has been figuring them out ever since, to the consternation of almost every opponent he has faced.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Sunday Gazette-Mail Charleston, West Virginia Sunday, July 12, 1959 - Page 22

Anniversary of Log Cabin club
“This tournament should bring up another meeting between Samuel Reshevsky and U.S. champion 16-year-old Bobby Fischer.”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Express and News San Antonio, Texas Sunday, July 19, 1959 - Page 72

Another Zurich Game
The United States representative to the Zurich International, Bobby Fischer, lost only two games, one to a tail-ender and the other to runner-up, S. Gligoric. You will probably agree, after playing over the game, that losing it was certainly no disgrace.…Fischer may have been too interested in the tactics at hand to consider the long range consequences of some of the moves he made.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Hartford Courant Hartford, Connecticut Sunday, July 26, 1959 - Page 23

Pocket Chess Set
The United States Chess Federation, 80 East 11th St., New York City, is selling handsome leather pocket chess sets, personally autographed by Bobby Fischer, at a price of $4.95. Bobby states that this is the best pocket chess set he has ever seen in any of the countries he has ever been in, including Canada, Cuba, Mexico, Chile, Argentina, Trinidad, Switzerland, Russia, Czechoslovakia, and Yugoslavia.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, August 02, 1959 - Page 104

Young Contender
BOBBY FISCHER'S GAMES OF CHESS—By Bobby Fischer; Simon and Schuster; $2.95; 97 pp.
The thirty-four chess games scored in this book represent the first collection of important tournament games played by the author, U.S. Open Chess Champion for 1958 and 1959, possible contender for the World Championship in the near future and, at 15, the youngest International Grand master of all time. Preceded by a review of his chess career the volume includes his 13 games played in the U.S. Open Tournament of 1957-1958, the 20 games he played in the 1958 Interzonal Matches in Yugoslavia and his prize-winning “Game of the Century” from the Rosenwald Trophy Tournament of 1956, called one of the most amazing feats of combinative depth and brilliancy by a 13-year-old in the long history of chess prodigies.
Annotation for fourteen of the games is by the author—the Interzonals were not annotated because of the lack of time and the pressure of school work—and these notes provide a valuable insight into the analytical resource and technical skill of one of the great chess minds of our time. This book will be a first-rate addition to anyone's chess library. Players of any degree of skill will get a great deal of pleasure from playing over Bobby Fischer's games against the leading world masters and will most certainly profit by becoming more familiar with the latest and soundest lines in chess.
ARTHUR RANDALL.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Miami News, Miami, Florida, Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 7

PEOPLE IN THE NEWS
‘How About Check, Mate?’

Wire Services of The Miami News
The mother of America's chess prodigy, Bobby Fischer, who hopes to wrest the world's chess championship from Russia, appealed today for financial aid so her son can enter the playoffs in Yugoslavia.
Mrs. Regina Fischer, of Brooklyn, said she and her 16-year-old son, the youngest international grand master in the world, have saved nearly $2000 — half the amount needed to pay the expenses for the nearly two-month long tournament.
“With another $2000 Bobby could be sure of being able to take part in this tournament,” Mrs. Fischer said.
Frank Brady, business manager of the U.S. Chess Federation, said that if the Fischers do not raise the money soon Bobby probably will not be able to participate.
The candidates tournament is scheduled to begin in Bled, Yugoslavia Sept. 6 and will last until Oct. 31. This will be an elimination tournament and the winner will face the present world champion, Russia's Mikhail Botvinnik in 1960.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

This article also appears in,

The Daily Courier, Connellsville, Pennsylvania, Saturday, August 08, 1959 - Page 9

Bobby Fischer Hopes to Take Chess Laurels
By Bart Kinch, United Press International
NEW YORK (UPI)—The mother of America's chess prodigy, Bobby Fischer, who hopes to wrest the world's chess championship from Soviet Russia, appealed today for financial aid so her son can enter the playoffs in Yugoslavia.
Mrs. Regina Fischer of Brooklyn N.Y., said she and her 16-year-old son, the youngest international grand master in the world, have saved nearly $2000—half the amount needed to pay the expenses for the nearly two month long tournament.
“With another $2000 Bobby could be sure of being able to take part in this tournament,” Mrs. Fischer said.
Frank Brady, business manager of the U.S. Chess Federation said that if the Fischers do not raise the money within a few days Bobby probably will not be able to participate.
“Actually, the International Chess Federation has stated that formal notice of availability be forwarded to the federation's headquarters in Sweden by Aug. 3,” Brady said.
“However, there is a degree of flexibility in the date and I'm sure that if Bobby raises the money by Aug. 10 his formal guarantee that he will play will be accepted.”
The candidates tournament is scheduled to begin in Bled, Yugoslavia on Sept. 6 and will last until Oct. 31. This will be an elimination tournament and the winner will face the present world champion, Russia's Mikhail Botvinnik in 1960.
Mrs. Fischer said that from March to June Bobby represented the United States in international chess events in Argentina, Chile and Switzerland. He won $300 which he is using to help defray the expenses of the upcoming Yugoslav trip—if he can make it.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Tampa Bay Times, St. Petersburg, Florida, Sunday, August 09, 1959 - Page 35

Chess Genius Without Pin Money, Says Mom
NEW YORK (HTNS) — From a letter to the editor this department learned its favorite athlete, Bobby Fischer, the chess genius, is still over in Yugoslavia and that his mother, Mrs. Regina Fischer, a nurse living in Brooklyn, is much concerned over the alleged refusal of the local chess authorities to kick through with proper walking-around money, etc.
It seems that each big chess player — and Bobby is the United States champion at the age of 16 — has a person designated as his “second.” This adjunct does not function like a Whitey Biemstein, patching cuts and exhorting to a new violence with the left-right-left. The chess “second” goes over gambits and Fanchet-to openings like the kings indian, and tries to keep his boy on the qui vive, so to speak.
Well, Mrs. Fischer says that the chess poobahs have been giving Bobby the brushoff. He and she, she says, have been putting up the boodle out of nursing and prize money. Unless something fiscal and immediate is done, she claims, Bobby will lose his place in the challengers' tournament for the world championship currently held by Mikhail Botvinnik, a Russian.

WRONG NUMBER
Local chess buffs did not seem to think that the champ's dam was telling the whole story. Nonetheless it was hard to pin down a story which was more convincing. It was suggested that we call a Morris J. Kasper, who was described as treasurer of the American Chess Foundation.
The number provided turned out to be the Lenox Hill Republican Club and the volunteer who answered had never heard of Mr. Kasper. He may even be a Democrat.
Other chess buffs, among them Hermann Helms, venerable and sprightly advocate of the Ruy Lopez opening, asserted that the foundation had agreed to contribute $2000 toward a “second” and other needed assets for Bobby but his mother wouldn't accept unless she were vouchsafed a look at the book.

A TICKET HOME
“Young Fischer has a ticket home which was given him by that television show (‘I've Got a Secret’(, but his mother won't let him come back,” said Helms. “He could come back here and play for $1,200 in the New Jersey log cabin tournament which is sponsored by the U.S. Chess Federation. But that isn't what his mother wants.”
The material we gathered indicated that the absent Bobby is a non-participating junior at Erasmus Hall High School in Brooklyn.
He has been away from this country since March. He played in Argentina and Chile, then moved to Europe. He has played no official chess since Chile but he is eligible as U.S. champion to play in the challenge tournament, involving eight masters which will be played in three Yugoslav cities — Bled, Zagreb and Belgrade — from Sept. 6 to Oct 29.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Des Moines Tribune, Des Moines, Iowa, Monday, August 10, 1959 - Page 6

No Money for Travel For Our Chess Champ
Sixteen-year-old Bobby Fischer, reigning United States chess champion, won the right last year to compete in European matches designed to pick a challenger for World Champion Mikhail Botvinnik of the Soviet Union. Young Fischer did so well he has been invited to come back next month as one of a select group of eight finalists that includes four Russians. But the invitation may have to be rejected.
Young Fischer's mother explains in a letter to the New York Herald Tribune that he has “already poured his own prize winnings, and my money, into essential preparations for this tournament.” The American chess champion is $2,000 short of being able to meet expenses. Mrs. Fischer declares: “The indifference to his plight and the constant suspense, not knowing whether he will or won't have the funds to be able to compete are having a terrible effect on him… The continual uncertainty and trying to raise funds somewhere, somehow from one tournament to the next is killing.”
American chess players, unlike their European competitors, have no organizations to provide backing or access to government help. Fischer was able to compete in Europe last year only because he won travel tickets on a television show.
The Russians go to great lengths in supporting chess. The game is taught in school, and leading players are given soft jobs and preferential treatment. The four Russians who will compete in the final eliminations will have seconds, physical trainers and full financial support.
Americans should not become chess conscious in order to “match the Russians”. But Americans should be proud of a youngster good enough to match wits with the world's best chess brains, and with a chance to compete for the world's highest chess honor.
If the United States can regularly send track stars and wrestlers abroad to compete with foreign athletes, surely $2,000 isn't too much for Americans to raise for our chess champion to enter international matches.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Austin American Austin, Texas Sunday, August 16, 1959 - Page 6

U.S. Chess Genius 'Tied' for Funds
By Edith Kermit Roosevelt
Were 16-year old Chess Genius Bobby Fischer to visit Russia, he would probably win more kudos than Vice President Nixon and Jazz Man Louis Armstrong put together.
Chess in Russia is a national pastime. It is taught in the schools. Russian boys and girls tote chess sets to the beat the way American couple carry a portable radio. At the international chess meets held in Moscow 18,000 Russians pore over the moves of the chess masters as they are duplicated on giant boards on the walls of the Palace of Sport in the Lenin Recreation Center. Then as the events are rebroadcasted, millions more Russians huddle over their radios and place bets on the players.
This is why if Bobby ever walked on Red Square he'd be mobbed with requests for autographs. A boy like Bobby Fischer is a credit to our country on a visit to Russia or anywhere else; not only is he U.S. champion but he's the youngest international grand champion of all time.
ALTHOUGH this wiry, six footer from Brooklyn is official U.S. representative to the Candidates Tournament to be held in Yugoslavia Sept. 6 to October 31, he had not yet been able to scrape together the $2,000 he need for expenses. Unless he finds a way to raise these funds immediately, he also will forfeit his chance to challenge the Soviet's World Champion Mikhail Botvinnik in Moscow in 1960.
In preparation for the coming tournament, Bobby already has exhausted both his own prize winnings and the spare peenies contributed by his mother, Mrs. Regina Fischer, a nurse.
Foreigners have a hard time understanding Bobby's embarrassing position. In their countries chess is a highly regarded, popular sport, subsidized by powerful chess organizations or by the state.
If Bobby gets to the Yugoslav meet, he will face four Russians whom the state has provided with coaches for the gambits, plus every kind of financial and moral backing.
In the U.S. chess is the step child of the sports world. It is considered a hobby befitting a retired colonel or perhaps an old maid with a lorgnette, but certainly not a career for a red-blooded American man. It is difficult, if not impossible, for a first-rate professional chess player to earn his keep from the game.
Last year, after winning the U.S. championship for 1958, Bobby qualified for the Interzonal Tournament in Yugoslavia during the summer. After three months in a futile attempt to raise money, he was only able to attend by a fluke. He won tickets on the Garry Moore Show, “I've Got A Secret.”
Like many standouts, Bobby's a high strung youth. And he's carrying a triple load. He must complete his schooling, pursue the demands of an exacting profession and raise money for chess coaches and chess literature.
Last winter after his day at Erasmus High School, Brooklyn, he sat up night to work on his book, “Bobby Fischer's Games of Chess.”
Bobby has been offered sizeable sums to compete in exhibition matches with weak players. He always refuses because “it would be bad for my chess.”
Instead, he takes off for faraway places, many times at his own expense, to compete against the international grand masters where, he says, “you can compete man-to-man against the strong players.”
BOBBY DOESN'T get a good press in this country. He has a shy, studious personality. His only friends are other top chess players, men usually two or three times his own age.
He rarely grants interviews “because I can't see why it's anybody's buisness to know what I eat for breakfast, when I take a shower or what time I go to bed.”
Fellow players describe Bobby as “quiet at the board.” Unlike some players, he has never been known to divert or annoy opponents by smoking, banging chess pieces or passing disconcerting remarks.
But gentleman though he is, Bobby is known as “a deadly fighter over the boards.” The youngster has total recall about moves and appears as fresh at the end of a five hour chess game as at the “openings.”
Bobby's plight has attracted the interest of the U.S. Chess Federation. The organization believes it is the obligation of this country's approximately 1,000,000 chess players to cooperate with their chess clubs in setting up a fund to support qualified chess masters in international meets. Chess is an intricate and challenging sport, one in which Americans should be proud to excel.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Press Democrat Santa Rosa, California Sunday, August 16, 1959 - Page 45

Sicilian Defense
The originality in this game is shown by Bobby Fischer when he pushes the KBP to B5, and later on exchanges pieces on Q5. The sacrifice on his 20th move must have been a shock to his opponent. It is neat. But what is even more striking is the way the young lad continues his vicious attack. Kupper is Switzerland's best player at the moment.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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St. Louis Post-Dispatch St. Louis, Missouri Friday, August 21, 1959 - Page 47

Eleanor Roosevelt
Chess Funds Needed
Hyde Park, Aug. 21.
ONE MOTHER who is doing her very best to help her son is Mrs. Regina Fischer of Brooklyn, N.Y. Her son is Bobby Fischer, the 16-year-old United States chess champion, and his current predicament is a shortage of funds.
As our national champion, Bobby is the official United States entry to the coming Candidates tournament, which will take place in Yugoslavia Sept. 6 to Oct. 31. Winner of this eight-man competition will become the new challenger in 1960 for the world championship title, now held by Mikhail Botvinnik of Russia. Mrs. Fischer is calling on all she can reach in her search for money to send her son to this tournament.

For some reason the United States Chess Federation does not seem to be strong enough to give our champion the money needed for participation in the various tournaments. Other countries back their representatives in these events. In the Candidates tournament there will be four Russian players, well provided with seconds, physical trainers and ever moral and financial backing.

Chess is a game that holds world interest, and though we in this country have not adopted it in the way some other countries have, still we have a considerable number of enthusiasts here. I don't know why we shouldn't be able to raise the $2000 needed to send our representative and a second to this tournament in Yugoslavia. It would seem to me that many people who consider this game educational would be willing to send in small sums.
Bobby Fischer is young to be carrying the responsibility of representing the United States, and I hope he will not also be asked to carry the responsibility of raising the money for travel and living expenses. I hope many of my readers will send contributions to: Bobby Fischer, care of the United States Chess Federation, 80 East Eleventh street, New York 3, N.Y. earmarked for use in representing the United States in the Yugoslavia tournament.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Indianapolis Star Indianapolis, Indiana Sunday, August 23, 1959 - Page 150

Young Hoosiers Take To Chess
NOT UNTIL the last two Olympic Games did Russia assert itself as a power in international sports.
But there is one game the Soviets have dominated for more than 30 years. That's chess.
A fine crop of young American players now is threatening the Russian chess domination, largely thanks to thousands of junior chess clubs popping up across the country. Indiana has more than two dozen such clubs.
One of them may include another Bobby Fischer.
Young Fischer created a sensation last January when he defeated five-time champion Samuel Reshevsky for the American title. Fischer is a 16-year-old Brooklyn (N.Y.) schoolboy, and polo-shirted teen-agers just don't go around whipping international grand masters. But, Bobby did—twice.
Fischer had gone practically unnoticed before the tournament. He looked like just another bright kid prospect—much like hundreds of today's teen-age Hoosier chess players.
Indianapolis, alone, has about 20 chess clubs—many of them composed largely of teen-agers. The Central and Senate Avenue YMCAs, the Jewish Community Center and the South Side YWCA are among agencies with junior clubs. Many local high schools also have chess organizations, not to mention several independent chess clubs for young people.
SPOTTING talent in young players is very, very difficult, according to Donald Byrne of Indianapolis—a man who should know.
Byrne is the fourth ranking player in the United States, although he has been fairly inactive during his five years' residence in Indiana. He was on the American team that whipped the Russians two years ago at Moscow.
Byrne has played against Bobby Fischer and admits he has seen no one here (or anywhere else) who looks as good.
It's a long step from competing in city and state meets to the “big time” of national and international competition, and few players have the innate ability to make the transition.
About the only way one can find out, Byrne says, is to play the best ones. But, he doesn't recommend that until one really is ready.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Courier-Journal Louisville, Kentucky Sunday, August 30, 1959 - Page 40

In the great Zurich International Grandmasters Tournament, the American champion, 16-year-old Bobby Fischer, has turned in another stellar performance and now looks like a better bet than ever to bring the world championship to the United States in the not-too-distant future.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, September 04, 1959 - Page 19

Bobby Fischer, the 16-year-old United States chess champion from Brooklyn, left yesterday by plane for Bled, Yugoslavia.
He will play there in the world challengers' tournament starting on Monday. The drawing for numbers by the eight players will be held on Sunday.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, September 06, 1959 - Page 157

Draw Set Today In Chess Tourney
Pairings for Challengers' Play in World Event to Be Decided at Bled

This is the fateful day on which eight of the leading grandmasters, assembled in Bled, Yugoslavia, under the auspices of the International Chess Federation, will draw lots for the numbers on which pairings will be based for the world championship challengers' tournament.
Play in the first round of fourteen to be contested in Bled, will start tomorrow and continue until Sept. 30, when the scene of this momentous struggle will switch to Zagreb for the next seven rounds.
The last installment of seven rounds is scheduled for Oct. 18-31 at the capital city of Belgrade.
As expected, the entry list is top-heavy with Russian talent. Because of his long experience and the fact that he alone has been able to win the world title from Mikhail Botvinnik, even though he lost in the return encounter, Vassily Smyslov is the favorite.
Keres Also Seeded
Smyslov and Paul Keres, a famous Estonian, were seeded. The two other Soviet competitors are Mikhail Tal, twice the national Russian champion, and Tigran Petrosian.
America's prospects are bright, nevertheless. In the forefront will be the 16-year-old United States champion, Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn. His latest performance in the grand manner was in the jubilee tournament in Zurich, where he tied for third place with Keres, below Tal and Svetozar Gligoric, first and second, respectively.
On that occasion, Bobby was well set to challenge Tal's lead, but took liberties with one of the outsiders. Should he maintain the pace he has set for himself, young Fischer may carry off the rich plum that is at stake.
Another top contender is Paul Benko, a Hungarian refugee who has carved out an honorable position in American chess circles since his arrival here from Iceland. That distant island in the north will be represented by Fridrik Olafsson of Reykjavik who, with Fischer, slipped into the charmed circle of eight when David Bronstein of Russia unexpectedly lost in the last round at Portoroz.
Still to be considered is Sevtozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia, whose long and impressive record speaks for itself.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Casper Star-Tribune, Casper, Wyoming, Sunday, September 06, 1959 - Page 11

Fischer — Bobby Fischer Games of Chess

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Fort Lauderdale News Fort Lauderdale, Florida Sunday, September 06, 1959 - Page 48

New Book Every devotee of the royal game will welcome the publication of Bobby Fischer's “Games of Chess.” The 15-year-old chess prodigy has penetratingly analyzed 13 of his games from the 1957 U.S. Championship, as well as the prize-winning “Game of the Century” from the Third Rosenwald Trophy Tournament.
Also included in the book are the scores of his 20 games from the 1958 Portoroz Interzonal Tournament in which he competed against the world's elite in chess and qualified for this year's Candidates Tournament.
The games and the personal annotations provide the reader with a look behind the scenes of genius. Here is a graphic picture of Fischer's brain at work. Here is the key to his brilliant moves and original conceptions.
By playing over these games, studying his notes and then analyzing each position on your own, your game is bound to improve.
“Games of Chess” sells for only $2.95. It is published by Simon and Schuster, Inc., Rockerfeller Center, 630 Fifth Ave., New York 20, N.Y.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, September 06, 1959 - Page 32

Challengers Start Play in Yugoslavia
“The most important international chess tournament of the year, which will select a challenger for the world championship, will start Sept. 7 in Bled, Yugoslavia. Eight of the strongest grandmasters in the world will be competing for the right to play a match next year with titleholder Mikhail Botvinnik of Russia.
The youngest entrant will be 16-year-old Bobby Fischer, U.S. champion for the last two years. He has high hopes of moving forward another giant step in his brilliant career.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, September 08, 1959 - Page 48

Keres Adjourns In Fischer Game
Soviet Ace Under Pressure by U.S. Ruler as World Chess Event Opens

Bobby Fischer, 16-year-old United States chess champion, made a promising start yesterday in the first round of the world championship challengers' tournament at Bled, Yugoslavia, according to a report received last night.
When his game with Paul Keres of the Soviet Union was adjourned after a session of five hours, the Brooklyn student was regarded by some of the experts present as having the upper hand.
Fischer set up a Sicilian defense against the Russian's king's pawn opening and met his great rival at every turn. The attack that Keres was engineering failed and he was under time pressure when, after forty-one moves, an adjournment was taken.
It will be played off Wednesday. Meanwhile, a start will be made on the second round.
The only first-round winner was Tigran Petrosian of the Soviet Union, who defeated Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland in a Nimzowitsch defense lasting thirty-five moves. Short of time, the Icelander lost a rook and he promptly resigned.
An evenly contested draw was recorded between Paul Benko, Hungarian refugee from New York, and Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia. The two Russians, Vassily Smyslov and Mikhail Tal, played a Sicilian defense to adjournment after forty-one moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, September 09, 1959 - Page 57

Fischer In Peril At Adjournment
U.S. Chess Ruler Is in Weak Position Against Petrosian After 41 Moves in Bled

The United States chess champion, Bobby Fischer, ran into tough competition last night in the second round of the world championship challengers' tournament in Bled, according to Yugoslav sources.
Paired with the Soviet Union's Tigran Petrosian, Fischer played to an adjournment, as he had done Monday night against Paul Keres of Latvia.
But against Keres the 16-year-old Brooklyn student had had the upper hand in his unfinished ending. Against Petrosian he was in difficulty when play ceased after forty-one moves.
The young American conducted the white pieces. His development against a Caro-Kann defense was not too satisfactory, but he did satisfactorily for thirty-two moves.
But he consumed almost all of his allotted time, and in his endeavor to escape forfeiture Fischer went astray. He sealed his move in a position regarded by experts to be favorable to Petrosian.
Only one of the four scheduled games reached a decision, the winner being Mikhail tal of the Soviet Union, who defeated Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia in a King's Indian defense lasting forty-two moves.
Paul Benko of New York had the preferable position with Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland, who opened with a Ruy Lopez. Forty-one moves had been recorded when play stopped.
Keres was at his best on the black side of a King's Indian defense with Vassily Smyslov of Moscow, a former world champion, and had a most promising position when intermission was taken after forty-one moves.
Adjourned games will be played off today and the third round is scheduled for tomorrow.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Asbury Park Press Asbury Park, New Jersey Wednesday, September 09, 1959 - Page 19

Fischer Runs Into Troubles in Chess
BLED, Yugoslavia (AP)—Bobby Fischer, 16-year-old from Brooklyn, ran into tough competition in Soviet champion Tigran Petrosjan in the second round of the Challengers' Chess Tournament yesterday.
Petrosjan used a Karokan defense for which Fischer did not seem well prepared.
The adjourned match will be resumed today.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, September 10, 1959 - Page 47

Fischer of Brooklyn Takes Chess Match From Keres at Bled
An impressive triumph was scored yesterday in Bled, Yugoslavia, by Bobby Fischer, the 16-year-old United States chess champion. As expected, he won his first-round game in the world championship challengers' tournament from Paul Keres of the Soviet Union.
According to a report received through Yugoslav news sources, the gifted American player made good the promise of victory held forth in the adjourned position of their game. He won it in fifty-one moves.
Keres had made desperate efforts to rush the lad in a prepared variation of the Sicilian defense, but the Brooklyn student held fast and emerged with a queen against his rival's rook and knight. This advantage sufficed to earn Fischer's first point in the tournament.
Bobby's success was the more noteworthy in view of the fact that he also had won from Keres in the international tournament at Zurich. When he arose as the winner yesterday, he received an ovation.
Next Fischer was called upon to face another Russian. Tigran Petrosian, in a second-round match adjourned from Tuesday. The Soviet grandmaster was a pawn ahead, posted on the seventh rank, and his defeat of the boy was predicted. Fischer fought valiantly for sixty-nine moves and then resigned to the inevitable.
Petrosian, who had been the sole winner on the opening day, took the lead in the standing with a score of 2—0. Paul Benko of New York, a Hungarian refugee, ranked second with 1½ points after winning his second-round game from Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland in fifty-five moves.
Keres redeemed himself by scoring over Vassily Smyslov of the Soviet Union, a former world champion, in the second round in sixty moves. Smyslov defeated Mikhail Tal, Soviet Union, in sixty-five moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

This article also appears in,

Tampa Bay Times St. Petersburg, Florida Thursday, September 10, 1959 - Page 39

Chess Whiz, 16, Wins Match In International
BLED, Yugoslavia (AP)—Sixteen-year-old Bobby Fischer of New York, the world's youngest chess grandmaster, yesterday defeated Soviet grandmaster Paul Keres in an adjourned first round match of the International Challengers Tournament.
The match between Fischer and Keres, who at 43 is the oldest in the eight-man tournament, was adjourned Monday with the American youth holding a slight advantage. After 50 minutes of play yesterday, Fischer checkmated Keres after 55 moves.
But Bobby also went down to defeat. He bowed to Soviet grandmaster Tigran Petroskan in the 69th move of their second round match adjourned from Tuesday.
Paul Benko, American grandmaster from New York, won his second round adjourned match, defeating Iceland's Fridrik Olafsson after 55 moves.
Benko and Fischer meet in the third round today.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Courier Waterloo, Iowa Friday, September 11, 1959 - Page 11

Think Yank Boy To Get Draw In Chess Meet
BLED, Yugoslavia (AP) — Teen-age Bobby Fischer and Paul Benko, both grandmasters from New York, adjourned their match in the International Challengers' Chess tournament Thursday.
When the match was adjourned, Benko had a slight advantage over his 16-year old opponent. But experts believe it will end in a draw.
Tigran Petrosjan of Russia held to first place as all four matches were adjourned.
The Soviet grandmaster has two points after three rounds with Benko in second place with 1½. Fischer is tied for third with one point.
The winner of the tournament qualifies to meet world champion Mikhail Botvinnik of the Soviet Union next year.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, September 12, 1959 - Page 16

Fischer Defeats Gligoric At Bled
American Chess Champion Winner in 32 Moves—Tal Turns Back Olafsson

Aggressive tactics in yesterday's fourth round at Bled, earned another triumph for Bobby Fischer, the United States champion, in the world championship challengers' tournament, according to a report received last night from Yugoslavia.
The 16-year-old American prodigy, playing the white side of a Sicilian defense, defeated Svetozar Gligoric of Belgrade. Fischer sacrificed an exchange to attain his objective. Gligoric resigned in thirty-two moves.
With one game adjourned from the third round, Fischer is tied at 2—1 for second place with Paul Benko of New York, a Hungarian refugee, and Mikhail Tal of the Soviet Union.
Benko drew with Vassily Smyslov of the Soviet Union in twenty-eight moves. This game, like all the others, was conducted along the lines of the Sicilian defense.
Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland, with the black pieces was under heavy time pressure with Tal. The Icelander's weak pawn position brought his resignation in thirty-two moves.
Paul Keres of the Soviet Union, playing white, adjourned in an even position with Tigran Petrosian, his countryman, who is still leading with a score of 2—0.
A First-Round Match
Full details of the play between Fischer and Keres, in the first round, reached here by airmail yesterday.
It confirmed the news that Fischer, after fighting off a novel attack, had the game well in hand at the time of adjournment. The road to victory, achieved by the young American, was then quite clear.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Troy Record Troy, New York Saturday, September 12, 1959 - Page 22

N.Y. Pair Moves Into Chess Lead
Bled, Yugoslavia (AP)—Bobby Fischer, 16, and Paul Benko, both of New York, moved into a tie for first place yesterday in the challengers chess tournament with two points each.
Fischer defeated Yugoslav Champion Svetozar Gligoric in a fourth round match and Benko drew with Vasil Smyslov of Russia.
Tigran Petrosjan of the Soviet Union, the third man in the deadlock, has the advantage, however, in that he has two adjourned matches to complete. Petrosjan's match yesterday with Soviet's Paul Keres was adjourned.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Post-Standard Syracuse, New York Saturday, September 12, 1959 - Page 9

Fischer and Benko Share in Chess Lead
BLED, Yugoslavia (AP)—Sixteen-year-old Bobby Fischer and Paul Benko, both of New York, moved into a three-way tie for first place Friday in the Challengers Chess Tournament with two points each.
Fischer defeated Yugoslav champion Svetozar Gligoric in a fourth round match and Benko drew with Vasil Smyslov of Russia.
Tigran Petrosjan of the Soviet Union, the third man in the deadlock has the advantage, however, in that he has two adjourned matches to complete.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, September 13, 1959 - Page 297

Fischer Gains Draw With Benko In Chess
A perpetual check, enforced by Bobby Fischer, United States chess champion, brought about a draw with Paul Benko, a Hungarian refugee of New York, yesterday, when they finished their third-round adjourned game in the world challengers' tournament at Bled, according to a report from Yugoslavia.
The unfinished position was slightly favorable to Benko who, however, was foiled in his effort to win a close ending by the ingenuity of the 16-year-old Brooklyn player. Benko and Fischer, with scores of 2½—1½, are tied for second place, behind Tigran Petrosian of the Soviet Union. 3½—½. Benko, undefeated, has won one game and drawn three.
Petrosian, after a draw in sixty moves with Vassily Smyslov of Moscow in their third-round match, was quite fortunate in winning from Paul Keres in the fourth round after fifty-one moves. Petrosian's pawn position was weak and the outlook for the success of Keres was excellent. He achieved what was regarded as a winning position, but an oversight on his part enabled Petrosian to sacrifice his queen and turn the tables.
A notable victory was scored by Keres against Mikhail Tal of the Soviet Union in their third-round match in sixty-four moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, September 13, 1959 - Page 34

Fischer Wins, Loses In Challengers' Tourney
Decisive results were the order of the day as play started in Bled, Yugoslavia, in the tournament to select a challenger for the world championship title now held by Mikhail Botwinnik of Russia.
Seven wins and one draw were recorded in the first two rounds, according to a report from the New York Times. This is a welcome change from the series of draws that generally result from sparring among the grandmasters.
Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, 16-year-old U.S. chess champion, started brilliantly with a victory in 51 moves over Paul Keres, former Estonian boy wonder, now representing Russia. Keres played a prepared variation in the Sicilian Defense, but Fischer held fast and at adjournment time had the advantage of a queen against his opponent's rook and knight. This proved sufficient to win.
Fischer faced another Russian, Tigran Petrosian, in the second round. Confronted with a Caro-Kann Defense, Fischer did not develop satisfactorily. He consumed almost all his allotted time and went astray shortly before adjournment. At that stage Petrosian had an extra pawn, posted on his seventh rank. Fischer fought valiantly for 69 moves before resigning.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Sunday Gazette-Mail Charleston, West Virginia Sunday, September 13, 1959 - Page 66

State Congress Here Was Handled Smoothly
“The annual East-West chess match, matches with Huntington (and other cities), the annual rapid-transit city championship tournament, a simultaneous exhibition featuring some noted chess master (Wren, Fischer, Reshevsky, Murtha, etc.) and the annual city chess tournament.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

This article also appears in,

Chicago Tribune Chicago, Illinois Sunday, September 13, 1959 - Page 50

New Yorkers Fischer, Benko Draw in Chess
BLED, Yugoslavia, Sept. 12 (AP)—Bobby Fischer and Paul Benko, both from New York, drew after 49 moves in their third round match in the International Challengers' chess tournament Saturday. Each has 2.5 points.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, September 14, 1959 - Page 41

Petrosian Play Halted Fischer
Process of Attrition Led to First Setback for U.S. Chess Star at Bled

What Paul Keres of the Soviet Union failed to do with a seemingly overwhelming attack against Bobby Fischer, the United States chess champion, Tigran Petrosian of Moscow achieved through a process of slow attrition. A result was the only defeat sustained so far by the 16-year-old Brooklyn schoolboy in the challengers' tournament at Bled, Yugoslavia.
Full details of the first session between these two rivals up to the time of adjournment have reached here by air mail. The modus operandi employed by the Russian to bring about a winning position by the time play ceased and Petrosian sealed his forty-first move is clearly shown.
Petrosian early exchanged one of his bishops for a knight. He strove for an ending in which his remaining knight, strongly posted, had greater potency than the cramped king's bishop of Fischer's forces.
During the mid-game tactics, Petrosian, who castled on the queen's side of the board, succeeded in capturing a pawn. Moreover, he had advanced his queen's pawn as far as the seventh rank, where it had strong support.
In a subsequent session, Petrosian fulfilled expectations and scored in sixty-eight moves.
Another victory placed to the credit of Petrosian was at the expense of Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland, who lost in the first round after thirty-eight moves.
Yesterday was a free day for the eight contestants at Bled, where the fifth round is scheduled for today. Petrosian leads with a score of 3½—½ and Paul Benko of New York is tied at 2½—1½ with Fischer for second place.
Following are the scores of two games played by Petrosian:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, September 15, 1959 - Page 49

Fischer's Match Adjourns In Bled
Olafsson Appears to Have Edge Over U.S. Star in Fifth Round of Chess

Unable to make any headway against Fridrik Olafsson of Reykjavik in the fifth round yesterday, Bobby Fischer, the United States chess champion, again played to an adjournment in the world championship challengers' tournament in Bled, according to a report received last night through Yugoslav news sources.
In charge of the black pieces, the 16-year-old American was kept on the defensive throughout. Meanwhile, the Icelander, for the first time at the top of his form, was content to play positionally sound chess.
In vain did Fischer endeavor to create a weakness in the hostile line-up. When play ceased after forty-one moves, Olafsson appeared to have a slight edge.
Tigran Petrosian of the Soviet Union maintained his lead, thanks to a thirteen-move draw with Mikhail Tal, twice a champion of Russia.
Paul Benko of New York lost in thirty-nine moves to Paul Keres of the Soviet Union. Keres moved into second place with a score of 3—2.
Svetozar Gligoric, Yugoslavia, won his first game from Vassily Smyslov, Soviet Union, in thirty-eight moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, September 16, 1959 - Page 51

Fischer Downed 2d Time In Chess
Tal Scores Over Brooklyn Youth in 41-Move Game at World Tourney

Bobby Fischer, the United States champion, suffered his second defeat in the world challengers' chess tournament in Bled yesterday according to a report reaching here last night through Yugoslav news sources.
Fischer again lost to a Soviet grandmaster: Mikhail Tal, twice the national champion of Russia. Tigran Petrosian had sent Fischer to his first setback.
Still undefeated, Petrosian leads the field with a score of 4—1. Tal moved into second place with 3½—2½, ahead of Paul Keres, Soviet Union, with 3—2.
Fischer, with the black pieces, resorted again to his favorite King's Indian defense. He held his own throughout a complicated mid-game struggle. Tal excelled in the ending and won in forty-one moves.

In the fourth-round game won by Fischer from Gligoric, the American again engineered a successful attack against the Sicilian defense after castling on the queen's side of the board. With the sacrifice of the exchange, he opened the king's rook's file and soon thereafter had his opponent at his mercy.
The score, which reached here by air mail yesterday:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, September 17, 1959 - Page 53

Olafsson Downs Fischer In Chess
Icelander Defeats Brooklyn Boy in 45 Moves—Benko Draws With Petrosian

Bobby Fischer, the United States chess champion, lost his fifth-round adjourned game to Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland yesterday in the challengers' tournament at Bled, according to a report from Yugoslavia.
Fischer, on the black side of a Sicilian defense, incorrectly sacrificed the exchange for a pawn. However, the 16-year-old Brooklyn youth was left with a chance to draw, had he not missed his way.
The play drifted into a winning end for Olafsson, who scored in forty-five moves. It was his first victory.
Fischer, who earlier had lost to Tigran Petrosian and Mikhail Tal, both of the Soviet Union, dropped back into a triple tie at 2½—3½ with Vassily Smyslov of the Soviet Union and Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia.
Three other adjourned games were drawn. Paul Keres of the Soviet Union and Gligoric fought out their sixth round match for sixty-six moves. Olafsson gained a half-point at the expense of Smyslov in sixty-seven moves.
Petrosian, still leading with a score of 4½—1½, was held to a draw by Paul Benko, Hungarian refugee from New York, who has lost only one game—to Keres. Of all the eight competitors, Petrosian alone remains undefeated. He has won three games outright and drawn three.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, September 18, 1959 - Page 36

Fischer, Smyslov Adjourn In Chess
Brooklyn Player Impresses Against Former World Champion at Bled

The United States chess champion, Bobby Fischer, played Vasily Smyslov of the Soviet Union yesterday in the seventh round of the challengers' tournament at Bled and gave a good account of himself before the five-hour time limit brought an adjournment.
The 16-year-old Fischer had the white pieces against the former world titleholder. According to a report from Yugoslav news sources, Smyslov countered with the Caro-Kann defense, adopting a somewhat unusual line.
However, the Brooklyn high school boy held his famous opponent at bay, although Smyslov had the initiative when play stopped after forty-one moves.
There was no change in the standing of the leaders. Tigran Petrosian of the Soviet Union adjourned a Caro-Kann defense after forty-one moves against Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia, who had a slight positional edge.
Paul Keres and Mikhail Tal, both of the Soviet Union, were winners and tied for second place with scores of 4½—2½. Keres defeated Fridrik Olafsson, Iceland, in a Reti opening lasting forty moves. Tal, playing a King's Indian defense, won from Paul Benko of New York in twenty-nine moves.

Benko is seen at his best in the following game with Olafsson, the score of which reached here yesterday.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, September 19, 1959 - Page 18

Keres Reverses Loss To Fischer
Beats U.S. Chess Champion in Yugoslavia, Making Up for First-Round Defeat

Paul Keres, Estonia's chess grand master, squared accounts yesterday with the United States champion, Bobby Fischer. Keres defeated the 16-year-old Brooklyn player in the eighth round of the challengers' tournament in Bled, according to Yugoslav news sources.
Fischer, on the opening day, had won from the Soviet Union representative when Keres missed his way in a daring combination. This time, conducting the black pieces, Keres toned down his tactics and resorted instead to calculated pressure.
This method prevented the American from seizing the initiative . The Russian scored in thirty-eight moves when his position seemed to be overpowering.
Keres and Mikhail Tal, who defeated a fellow Russian, Vassily Smyslov, in another reversal of a first-round result, tied at 5½-2½ for first place.
Tigran Petrosian of the Soviet Union, who had shared the lead, adjourned against Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland. Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia, adjourned with Paul Benko of New York.
Details of Fischer's losing game against Olafsson in the fifth round were received yesterday.
Fischer, on the black side of a Sicilian defense, took a long chance in sacrificing the exchange at his fifteenth turn. But he won a pawn and obtained a seemingly powerful center.
The initiative, however, was retained by the Icelander, who sprang a surprise in offering the sacrifice of a rook on the thirty-seventh move. It forced the exchange of queens, leaving Fischer with a lost ending.
The score follows:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, September 20, 1959 - Page 284

Fischer, Smyslov Play In Deadlock
American and Russian Draw in 7th-Round Adjourned Game of Chess Event

Bobby Fischer, United States chess champion, played to a draw with Vassily Smyslov of the Soviet Union in their seventh-round adjourned game in the challengers' tournament at Bled yesterday.
The 16-year-old Brooklyn student was cheered by his success in scoring half a point against a former world champion, with whom he is now in a quadruple tie for fifth place.
It was an uphill struggle for the American inasmuch as the position, upon resumption, appeared to be favorable to the Russian. Fischer held his own in an ending that called for the most exacting calculation.
Results of other pending adjourned games brought about important changes among the leaders. Tigran Petrosian, Soviet Union, until then the sole undefeated contestant, lost both of his unfinished games.
He resigned after fifty-seven moves to Svetozar Gligoric, Yugoslavia, in the seventh and was then defeated by Fridrik Olafsson, Iceland, in the eighth round after sixty moves.
Consequently, Paul Keres and Mikhail Tal, both of the Soviet Union, shared first place with scores of 5½-2½. Petrosian, at 4½-3½, dropped to a tie with Gligoric for third place. Gligoric also won in the eighth round from Paul Benko, Hungarian refugee from New York, in fifty-three moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Sunday Gazette-Mail, Charleston, West Virginia, Sunday, September 20, 1959 - Page 66

Speaking Of Chess
THE TOURNAMENT to produce a challenger for a title match with World Champion Mikhail Botvinnik is now under way in Yugoslavia. The games will be played in more than one location, starting with Bled — location of the great 1931 international tournament where Alekhine won one of his greatest triumphs.
The 1959 American representative, young Bobby Fischer, chess champion of the United States while still in his teens, is having some rather spectacular ups and downs. The ups consist of first and fourth round wins over Paul Keres and Svetozar Gligoric, respectively.
The downs are represented by second and sixth round losses to two of the Russian contingent, Tigran Petrosian (an Armenian) and Mikhail Tal (a Latvian). Bobby drew Paul Benko in round three and adjourned his fifth round game with Frederik Olafson, in a position somewhat favorable to his Icelandic opponent.
AT THIS challengers' tournament is a double round-robin affair, Bobby still has pretty fair chances — at least in theory. After six rounds, Petrosian led the field, 4 to 1; Tal had 3½ to 2½ and Keres 3 to 2. But if Fischer has already lost twice, he is in good company with such noted and experienced grandmasters as Vassily Smyslov and Paul Keres.
However, the U.S. champion will probably settle down and finish with a good score — perhaps even win the coveted first prize. In this chess event it is First or nothing. There is no second prize comparable to the winner's opportunity to play for the chess championship of the world. But the young American has another strong asset along with his demonstrated skill, his youthful stamina.
He is the youngest of all the contenders in the challenge tournament.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, September 22, 1959 - Page 48

Petrosian Beats Fischer In Chess
Defeats American Champion in 32 Moves—Gligoric and Tal Play Draw

Ninth-round results in the challengers' chess tournament at Bled yesterday included another setback for the United States champion, Bobby Fischer, according to a report received through Yugoslav news sources last night.
Tigran Petrosian of the Soviet Union, who had won from the 16-year-old Brooklyn student in the second round, outplayed him again and scored in thirty-two moves.
Fischer, who has not won since the fourth-round, had the black pieces. Anxious to make headway, he attempted to gain the initiative, but his opening, a Nimzo-Indian defense, was unsatisfactory. His queen's bishop had no outlet and he lost two pawns on the queen's side of the board.
Petrosian moved back into third place, ahead of Svetozar Gligoric, Yugoslavia, who drew in twenty-seven moves of a Ruy Lopez with Mikhail Tal of the Soviet Union. Tal leads with a score of 6—3.
Paul Keres, Soviet Union, also played the Ruy Lopez against Vassily Smyslov, his countryman, and adjourned after forty-one moves.
Another adjourned game, in forty-two moves, was a Sicilian defense played by Fridrik Olafsson, Iceland, against Paul Benko of New York. The Icelander, pressed for time, lost two of his pawns. However, the experts believe he still has a chance to win or draw.
Following is the score of the important game which was won by Gligoric from Smyslov:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, September 23, 1959 - Page 48

Fischer Defeats 10th-Round Rival
Triumphs Over Benko in 27 Moves With Forcing Play in Yugoslav Chess

Playing at top form, the United States chess champion, Bobby Fischer, defeated Paul Benko of New York yesterday in the tenth round of the challengers' tournament at Bled, according to a report from Yugoslavia.
The victory lifted the 16-year-old American from last place to fifth in the field of eight players. His record is 4—6.
As has been his custom, Fischer started with 1 P-K4, to which Benko retorted with the Sicilian defense. To break open the position, the Brooklyn schoolboy sacrificed a pawn, following with a vigorous attack against the black king.
After twenty-seven moves, Benko was forced to resign. Their first encounter, in the third round, had resulted in a draw.
Paul Keres of the Soviet Union took the lead at 6½-2½ with a victory in forty moves against Mikhail Tal, another Soviet representative. Keres' handling of the Nimzo-Indian defense encouraged risky play on the part of Tal.
Tal, at 6—4, tied for second place with Tigran Petrosian of the Soviet Union, who drew on the black side of an English opening in a game against Vasily Smyslov lasting twenty-eight moves.
The game between Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland and Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia was adjourned. The Icelander exerted a steady pressure against a King's Indian defense and had a slight positional advantage when play ceased after forty moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, September 25, 1959 - Page 36

Petrosian Plays Draw With Keres
Fischer, on Defense Against Gligoric, Adjourns in 11th Round of Chess at Bled

Paul Keres and Tigran Petrosian, two of the four Russians in the world challengers' chess tournament at Bled, played an uneventful draw in the eleventh round, according to a report last night from Yugoslavia.
It was the only game finished in that round. The result left Keres in first place. Petrosian moved into second place.
Three matches were adjourned, including that between Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, the United States champion, and Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia. The 16-year-old Fischer, playing the black pieces, was kept on the defensive.
Endeavoring to extricate himself from an unpromising position, Fischer drifted into an ending in which his prospects were none too clear. Adjournment was taken after five hours and Gligoric sealed his forty-first move.
Mikhail Tal of Moscow, in third place, outplayed Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland and had the superior position when play stopped after forty-one moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, September 26, 1959 - Page 20

Keres Triumphs In 31-Move Game
Challengers' Chess Leader Defeats Benko—Fischer and Olafsson Adjourn

Paul Keres of the Soviet Union, tightened his hold on first place yesterday by defeating Paul Benko of New York in the twelfth round of the world challengers' chess tournament in Bled, according to a report received last night from Yugoslavia.
The Estonian grandmaster was at his best with the white pieces. He broke down the defense of the Hungarian refugee and scored in thirty-one moves.
Keres' score is 8½—3½.
The only game unfinished yesterday was between Bobby Fischer, United States champion, and Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland. The latter was on the defensive throughout.
Two Soviet Union grandmasters, Tigran Petrosian and Mikhail Tal, drew in thirty-seven moves to retain second and third places, respectively.
Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia held fourth place by drawing with Vassily Smyslov, Soviet Union.
In his effort to square accounts with Petrosian in the ninth round for a defeat sustained in the second, Fischer depended too much upon maneuvers against the white king that were successfully met by the Russian.
Petrosian, meanwhile, established superiority on the queen's side of the board, where he captured two pawns. Faced with certain defeat, Fischer resigned after thirty-one moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, September 27, 1959 - Page 270

Gligoric Defeats Fischer In Chess
Olaffson's Game With U.S. Youth Adjourned Again—Benko Upsets Smyslov

The United States chess champion, Bobby Fischer, figured in two adjourned games of the world championship challengers' tournament in Bled yesterday.
He lost to Svetozar Gligoric, Yugoslavia, in an eleventh round match and adjourning a second time with Fridrik Olafsson, Iceland, in the twelfth.
Play in the first game was not resumed, as the Brooklyn player's position was hopeless, according to a report received from Yugoslavia.
Gligoric, the aggressor, at first won a pawn. The play became complicated and he emerged with a rook and three pawns in exchange for two minor pieces. Later, Fischer lost two additional pawns, leaving him in a position which, analysis demonstrated, could not be saved. Forty-three moves had been recorded.
Fischer greatly improved his chances in the twelfth-round game with Olafsson, who lost a pawn. After seventy-four moves, Fischer was considered to have a good chance to win.
In an upset, Paul Benko, Hungarian refugee from New York, defeated Vassily Smyslov of Moscow, former world champion, in an eleventh-round game in seventy-four moves. The /illegible; 'ending'/'opening'/, a difficult one, was cleverly handled by the New Yorker. He advanced to fifth place in the standing.
Mikhail Tal, Soviet Union, won his eleventh-round game from Olafsson in seventy-one moves and advanced to second place. Under time pressure the Icelander frittered away a /illegible/ position. Tied for third place are Tigran Petrosian, Soviet Union, and Gligoric.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, September 27, 1959 - Page 29

“After eight completed rounds, Paul Keres and Mikhail Tal, both of the Soviet Union, were tied for the lead with scores of 5½-2½. Tal had gained most ground with successive victories against U.S. chess champion Bobby Fischer, Paul Benko of New York, and former world champion Vassily Smyslov of Moscow.

Fischer was given a rough time, scoring only half a point in his last three games. In the sixth round he lost to Tal in 41 moves. Fischer, with the black pieces, resorted to his favorite King's Indian Defense. He held his own throughout a complicated middle game, but Tal developed threats in the ending which proved decisive.
In the seventh round Fischer gave a good account of himself against Smyslov. The Russian adopted an unusual line in the Caro-Kann Defense and had the initiative through the first session. The game was soon drawn, however, after adjournment.
In the eighth round the pairings were identical with those in the first round, except that the colors were reversed. Most of the scores were reversed as well. This time Fischer, who had defeated Keres on the opening day, lost in 38 moves when the Russian built up an overpowering position.
Following are the results of play last week and games from the tournament.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin Racine, Wisconsin Sunday, September 27, 1959 - Page 15

WORLD CANDIDATES
In round 10 of the World's Candidates tournament at Bled, Bobby Fischer dropped Pal Benko to last place in the 8-man field with a victory over his fellow American. Fischer sacrificed a pawn and won in 27 moves against Benko's Sicilian Defense. Fischer's win jumped him to fifth place from last. The standings after round 10:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Sunday Gazette-Mail Charleston, West Virginia Sunday, September 27, 1959 - Page 64

“With ten of fourteen rounds of play complete in the challengers tournament at Bled, Yugoslavia, it has become quite apparent that the United States' 16-year-old chess champion Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, will not win first place and the right to play Mikhail Botvinnik for the championship of the world in 1960.
After three straight defeats, Bobby rallied to defeat Paul Benko in round 10 giving him a 4 to 6 record and fifth position. But four more rounds remain to be contested.
In the lead with a fine 6½ to 2½ is Paul Keres of the Soviet Union (but an Estonian by birth). Fellow Russians (one is an Armenian and the other a Latvian) Tigran Petrosian and Mikhail Tal, trail Keres, with 6 to 4 scores. The fourth Russian entry, ex-world champion Vassily Smyslov, is having his troubles and is in sixth position, one half point behind young Fischer.
If, as seems most probable, the youthful American titleholder will not win the challengers tourney, many chess players in the United States would look kindly on a Keres victory and would be pulling for him to overthrow Botvinnik next year.
Keres has been a modest and popular figure in the chess world—and one of the greatest grandmasters—for a quarter-century.
He and Reuben Fine tied for first place in the great 1938 AVRO tournament but Keres was the official winner on a tie-breaking system. Keres was one of the five grandmasters who played for the championship of the chess world when Akehine's death vacated the title.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

This article also appears in,

The Orlando Sentinel Orlando, Florida Sunday, September 27, 1959 - Page 50

Fischer Concedes Defeat
Bled, Yugoslavia (AP) Bobby Fischer, young U.S. contender in the international chess tourney, conceded defeat yesterday in his adjourned match with Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia without taking his seat at the table.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, September 29, 1959 - Page 51

Fischer Is Beaten By Tal In 34 Moves
Latvian Outplays Brooklyn Youth In Chess at Bled—Petrosian Downs Benko

Bobby Fischer, the United States chess champion, bowed to Mikhail Tal, the Latvian grandmaster, in thirty-four moves yesterday in the thirteenth round of the world challengers' tournament in Bled, according to a report from Yugoslavia.
Although the former Soviet champion played the black pieces he wrested the initiative from the 16-year-old Brooklyn youth.
Tigran Petrosian of the Soviet Union won in thirty-three moves from Paul Benko, a Hungarian refugee from New York.
Two games were adjourned, each after forty moves. They paired Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland with Vassily Smyslov of the Soviet Union and Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia with Paul Keres of the Soviet Union.
Fischer's fighting spirit was well illustrated in his handling of the white forces in a seventh-round game with Smyslov, the full score of which has been received by air mail.
Aggressive in the beginning, Fischer steadied himself in the difficult middle game after compelling the black king to move. An exchange of queens brought on a struggle among the four rooks, with passed pawns on both sides. The ending was marked by accuracy.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, September 30, 1959 - Page 46

Draw By Fischer In Chess Likely
U.S. Champion Adjourns in 14th-Round Game Against Smyslov in 41 Moves

The United States chess champion, Bobby Fischer, and Vassily Smyslov, a former world champion from the Soviet Union, met for the second time yesterday in the fourteenth round of the world challengers' tournament in Bled and adjourned after forty-one moves, according to a report from Yugoslavia.
When the five-hour session ended there was a strong likelihood that the result would again be a draw. Fischer had the black side of a Sicilian defense and sacrificed the exchange for two pawns. However, Smyslov found a good defense.
Fischer has pending another game after two sittings with Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland.
Olafsson, also playing the Sicilian defense, lost to Paul Keres, Soviet Union, in forty-one moves. Keres, who obtained a grip on the game through capture of a pawn, leads the field with a score of 9½—3½.
One point below him, with 9½—4½, is Mikhail Tal, who vanquished Paul Benko, a Hungarian refugee from New York, in a Sicilian defense lasting only thirty moves. A smashing attack carried the Russian to victory.
The other two contestants in the first division, Tigran Petrosian, Soviet Union, and Svetozar Gligoric, Yugoslavia, drew an English opening in thirteen moves by repetition.
Details of the game won by Fischer from Benko in the tenth round reached here yesterday. Benko lost time in his development of the queen's side of the board. Meanwhile, the United States champion built up a telling attack against the black king. It succeeded because of his manipulation of two knights in conjunction with the white queen.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

This article also appears in,

The Times Record Troy, New York Wednesday, September 30, 1959 - Page 23

Match Adjourned
Bled, Yugoslavia (AP)—The 14th round chess match between Bobby Fischer, the U.S. champion from Brooklyn, and Russia's Vassily Smyslov was adjourned yesterday. Fischer was in a better position. They are among the eight competing in the world challengers' tournament.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, October 01, 1959 - Page 45

Fischer Picks Up 1½ Chess Points
Brooklynite Scores Victory and Draw in Yugoslavia—Keres in First Place

The first half of the world championship challengers' chess tournament concluded yesterday at Bled, according to a report from Yugoslavia.
The leader, Paul Keres of the Soviet Union, drew his last game with Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia, adjourned from the thirteenth round. It lasted seventy-two moves.
Keres, an Estonian, had a score of 10-4. Mikhail Tal and Tigran Petrosian of the Soviet Union are next.
Bobby Fischer, the United States champion, picked up 1½ points in two adjourned games and is in sixty place. First the 16-year-old Brooklyn student won his twelfth-round game from Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland in seventy-eight moves after three sittings.
Next Fischer drew in forty-six moves with Vassily Smyslov of the Soviet Union in the fourteenth round. Fischer made an ingenious attempt to find a winning line but was foiled at every turn. Smyslov improved his standing by outplaying Olafsson in their thirteenth-round match.
Play will resume Saturday at Zagreb for seven rounds until Oct. 14. The remaining seven rounds will be played at Belgrade.

The moves of the second game between Fischer and Svetozar Gligoric, won by the Yugoslav in the eleventh round, reached here yesterday by air mail.
Gligoric sacrificed a piece for three pawns. In the ending he had two rooks and four pawns opposed by a rook and two minor pieces, leaving Fischer in a hopeless position.
The score:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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The Tennessean Nashville, Tennessee Thursday, October 01, 1959 - Page 48

Fischer Wins in Chess
BLED, Yugoslavia—(AP)—Bobby Fischer, the 16-year-old American champion from Brooklyn, gained a victory and a draw yesterday in two adjourned matches in the World Challengers Chess tournament.
The youngster won from Iceland's Fridrik Olafsson on the 7th move and drew with Russia's Vassily Smyslov in 46 moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Wisconsin Jewish Chronicle, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Friday, October 02, 1959 - Page 13

THE ONLY REAL, MAJOR STAR who has gone forward and upward during the past year has been sixteen-year-old Bobby Fischer, the United States chess champion. But even Bobby has had his disappointments. In his case, considering his youth and his gifts, the setbacks are minor, indeed. Still they indicate that Fischer has quite a way to go before he comes as good as Sammy Reshevsky at his peak, and Mikhail Botvinnik, the present titleholder.
Fischer retained his American championship; qualified for a major tournament by finishing fifth in Yugoslavia; and came in third in a fine field in Zurich. In Zurich, he had not lost any games until the twelfth round and then he was beaten twice, just enough for him to lose out to Mikhail Tal of Russia. Nevertheless, Bobby is no flash-in-the-pan and his constant good showings prove his basic solidity as a player. A few more years of such tournament play will give to Fischer the necessary experience to meet Botvinnik, or whoever will be the champion when Bobby is ready for him.
★ ★ ★

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, October 03, 1959 - Page 13

Fischer To Face Keres
U.S. Chess Champion to Play Tonight in Zagreb Match

Bobby Fischer, the United States chess champion, will meet Paul Keres of the Soviet Union tonight in the fifteenth round at Zagreb, Yugoslavia, in the challengers' tourney.
Fischer now is in sixth place among the eight contenders. He defeated Keres on the opening day, but lost the return match in the eighth round. Keres, now leading the field, will play white.
Tal, who is in second place, has beaten Fischer twice. In the second game Fischer was unable to defend his king's knight's pawn, lost the exchange and from then on had a hopeless struggle on his hands.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Green Bay Press-Gazette, Green Bay, Wisconsin, Saturday, October 03, 1959 - Page 16

“…“Bobby Fischer's Games of Chess,” Bobby Fischer;…

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, October 04, 1959 - Page 256

Fischer Tops Keres In Yugoslav Chess
Bobby Fischer, the champion of the United States, defeated Paul Keres of the Soviet Union in the fifteenth round of the world championship chess challengers' tournament at Zagreb yesterday, according to Yugoslav news sources. Keres, the leader in the tournament lost to Fischer for the second time.
The 16-year-old American, who won in twenty-seven moves, had the black side of a King's Indian defense, but obtained the initiative through the sacrifice of a pawn. Hard pressed in a difficult position, Keres erred and lost a piece.
Earlier, at Bled, Fischer had won from Keres in the first round, but lost to him in the eighth. This is an important triumph for the Brooklyn schoolboy, who is now tied, at 6½—8½, with Vassily Smyslov of Moscow, former world champion.
Symslov, on the white side of a Sicilian defense, established a winning position against Mikhail Tal, Soviet Union, but permitted him to escape with a draw in forty moves. Tal thus tied at 10—5 for the first place with Keres.
Another draw was recorded between Paul Benko, the Hungarian refugee from New York, and Svetozar Gligoric, Yugoslavia, in a Queen's Gambit lasting forty moves.
Tigran Petrosian, Soviet Union, adjourned a Nimzo-Indian defense with Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland after forty-one moves. Olafsson missed his way and the outcome will most likely be a draw.
The sixteenth round is scheduled for today.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, October 04, 1959 - Page 40

Keres Takes Lead In Challengers' Chess
Soviet grandmaster Paul Keres, former Estonian boy wonder, now at 43 the oldest man in the event, has established a full point lead after 12 rounds of the Challengers' Tournament at Bled, Yugoslavia.
With seven wins, three draws and two losses, Keres has a score of 8½-3½, according to a report from the New York Times. He lost in the first round to U.S. chess champion Bobby Fischer and in the fourth round to Tigran Petrosian of Russia but have not been close to defeat since.
In second place, with 7½-4½, is 23-year-old Mikhail Tal of Russia, who has been playing the most aggressive, venturesome chess of the tournament. He has six wins to his credit, two draws and three losses, one to former world champion Vassily Smyslov of Russia, and two in his encounters with Keres.
In the first division, half a point behind Tal, are Petrosian and Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia. The four leaders have established a sizable margin against the remaining four contestants, who are all on the minus side.
Fischer, whose play has been erratic, started the week with a loss to Petrosian. Opening with the Nimzo-Indian Defense, the 16-year-old Brooklyn boy attempted to gain the initiative. His development was unsatisfactory, however, and his queen's bishop had no outlet. As a result, Petrosian won two pawns and scored in 32 moves.
In the 10th round Fischer played in top form to earn a victory in 27 moves over Paul Benko of New York, a former Hungarian refugee now residing in the United States. Fischer sacrificed a pawn to break open the position, following with a vigorous attack against the black king.
Fischer was set back in the 11th round by Gligoric, whom he had defeated in their first meeting. This time Fischer was kept on the defensive from the outset, drifting into an unfavorable ending. The game was adjourned after 41 moves but resigned by Fischer without resuming.
The 12th round was another story. Paired with Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland, Fischer took command and maintained a steady pressure. After two sessions and a total of 74 moves, the game was adjourned, with Fischer a pawn ahead and good prospects for a win.
Following are details of the play last week and games from the tournament:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Sunday Gazette-Mail Charleston, West Virginia Sunday, October 04, 1959 - Page 65

“…It was erroneously stated here that the challengers chess tournament in Bled, Yugoslavia, was scheduled for 14 rounds. Actually, this eight-player event will run for 28 rounds—seven more at Zagreb and the final seven at Belgrade.
At the mid-point, after fourteen complete rounds, U.S. champion Bobby Fischer was fifth with 5½ to 8½. Paul Keres of the USSR led with 10 to 4, followed by two fellows-Soviets, Mikhail Tal (9½ to 4½) and Tigran Petrosian (8½ to 5½). Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia had 8 to 6 and ex-world champion Vassily Smyslov of Russia had 6 to 8. Next in order followed Fischer, Pal Benko of Hungary (but a refugee in the USA) and Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland.
That “youth will be served” is often true in chess as in other sports. The younger Tal and Petrosian may catch up with or pass Paul Keres in the final rounds of tournament play in this great chess event. Although an unlikely candidate for first place, now, sixteen - year - old Bobby Fischer (of Brooklyn) may improve on his standing during the coming days of tourney competition and may well finish in the first division.
★ ★ ★
WE WONDER what kind of arrangements Grandmaster Fischer made with his home-town high school officials for time off. Or perhaps the Brooklyn truant officer cannot extradite from so far away as Yugoslavia.
It might be of interest to know that Fischer's second in the challengers tournament is Bent Larson, talented Danish master — or is it grandmaster?
Time was when there were only five grandmasters — and what grandmasters! — Dr. Emmanual Lasker, Raul Capablanca, Alexander Alekhine, Frank J. Marshal and Dr. S. Tarrasch. Now the woods are full of them. Charleston has no masters or grandmasters. The local area boasts one great-grandmaster, but that is another story.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Ogden Standard-Examiner Ogden, Utah Sunday, October 04, 1959 - Page 1

U.S. Teenager Whips Russ Champ In Chess World Championships
CHESS SENSATION: Teen-age U.S. chess champion Bobby Fischer from Brooklyn, N.Y. last night stunned the chess world with a thrilling three-hour victory over Soviet grand master Paul Keres in the candidates' tournament for the chess world championships in Zagreb, Yugoslavia.
Fischer's win, in 27 moves, was the sensation of the tournament, now in its fifteenth round.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin Racine, Wisconsin Sunday, October 04, 1959 - Page 26

CANDIDATES TOURNAMENT
After 12 rounds of play Paul Keres retains his lead in the Challenger's event now under way at Bled, Yugoslavia, with Tal second, in round 11 Bobby Fischer of the U.S. lost to Gligoric, and dropped back to seventh place. Fischer has one other adjourned game, from the 12th round, in which he holds a pawn advantage over Olaffson of Iceland in a twice-adjourned position. The other U.S. entrant, Pal Benko, improved his position in the standings with an upset win over former World Champion Vassily Smyslov in 74 moves, by virtue of his clever end-game play.
The standings at the end of round 12


No game scores are available yet from the candidates tournament, but we have the following interesting game between Fischer and Keres from the Zurich tournament last June, showing that “The Kid,” as Reshevsky calls him, is not playing out of his league.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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The Cincinnati Enquirer Cincinnati, Ohio Sunday, October 04, 1959 - Page 6

Beats Soviet Chess Master
Zagreb, Yugoslavia, Oct. 3 (UPI)—Teenage U.S. Chess Champion Bobby Fischer, Brooklyn, N.Y. tonight stunned the chess world with a thrilling three-hour victory over Soviet Grand Master Paul Keres in the Candidates' Tournament for the chess world championships. Fischer's win, in 27 moves, was the sensation of the tournament, now in its 15th round.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Express and News San Antonio, Texas Sunday, October 04, 1959 - Page 103

Candidates
Bobby Fischer started out like a ball of fire, registering 2½ points out of 4 with a draw with Benko, loss to Petrosian, and wins against Keres and Gligoric, then he suffered at the hands of Tal, Olafsson and Keres, and may have a loss with Smyslov.
It seems they have found his weakness—positional chess. They are not trying to run over him, but are instead squeezing him to death positionally.
Four losses in a row could be extremely discouraging for a young man of 16. Let's hope he snaps out of it because he can still make a respectable score.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, October 05, 1959 - Page 39

Fischer Adjourns Petrosian Match
Has Initiative After 41 Moves in Chess but Draw Looms—Keres Splits Point

Bobby Fischer and Tigran Petrosian of the Soviet Union adjourned after forty-one moves yesterday in the challengers' chess tournament at Bled. Yugoslavia, according to a report received here.
Fischer, the United States champion, played the white pieces and retained the initiative. Indications point to a draw in the third meeting of the pair. Petrosian won the first two games.
The tournament leader, Paul Keres of the Soviet Union, drew in thirty-five moves with Vassily Smyslov of the Soviet Union. Keres' score is 10½—5½.
Mikhail Tal, Soviet Union, second in the standing, adjourned with Svetozar Gligoric, Yugoslavia, in forty-one moves. A draw in thirty-two moves was registered between Fridrik Olafsson, Iceland and Paul Benko of New York.
Fischer, playing the black side of a King's Indian defense, defeated Keres for the second time in twenty-seven moves on Saturday night. He obtained the initiative through the sacrifice of a pawn and forced his rival into an error.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, October 06, 1959 - Page 50

Tal Chess Leader With 11-5 Record
Beats Gligoric in 52 Moves and Overtakes Keres in Challengers' Tourney

Mikhail Tal took first place in the world challengers' chess tournament yesterday, according to a report received from Zagreb, Yugoslavia.
Tal, one of the four Soviet players competing, won his adjourned sixteenth-round game with Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia in fifty-two moves. The victory gave him a score of 11—5, half a point better than Paul Keres of the Soviet Union, the previous pace-settler.
Regarded critically as the best game of the tournament and one of the longest was the victory of Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland over Tigran Petrosian of the Soviet Union, who is third in the standing. After the first five-hour session, during which Olafsson captured a pawn, four additional hours were required to reach a decision. Olafsson, however, is still in eighth place.
Bobby Fischer, the United States champion, also had an unfinished game with Petrosian, from the sixteenth round, but this, necessarily, was postponed until Thursday. The adjourned position is fairly even in a queen-and-pawn ending. Fischer is in sixth place with a score of 6½—8½.

The score of one of Fischer's most hard-fought games was received yesterday.
It was his second encounter with Olafsson, in the twelfth round, and was won by the 16-year-old Brooklynite in seventy-eight moves.
Fischer had the white pieces in a Ruy Lopez, which followed familiar lines of attack and defense. Exercising great patience, he gradually gained a slight position advantage. On the seventy-second move he captured a pawn, and this soon led to victory.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, October 07, 1959 - Page 54

Tal Defeats Keres In Chess At Zagreb
Mikhail Tal of Moscow strongly entrenched in first place in the challengers' chess tournament at Zagreb, won for the first time from Paul Keres of the Soviet Union in the seventeenth round, according to a report from Yugoslavia yesterday.
Tal was on the defensive throughout, but outwitted his chief rival in the ending. Keres, who had won from Tal in the third and tenth rounds, resigned after forty moves, but retained second place. Tal's score is 12—5, against 10½—6½ for Keres.
Tigran Petrosian, Soviet Union, playing the white pieces, lost to Vassily Smyslov, Soviet Union, in thirty moves. Both of their earlier meetings had resulted in draws. Petrosian is tied for third place with Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia.
Bobby Fischer, United States champion, played the black pieces for forty-two moves without arriving at a decision against Paul Benko, a Hungarian refugee from New York.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, October 08, 1959 - Page 53

Tal Adds To Lead In Chess Tourney
Soviet Union Player Scores Over Olafsson of Iceland in 42 Moves at Zagreb

Mikhail Tal of the Soviet Union strengthened his lead in the challengers' chess tournament at Zagreb yesterday. He defeated Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland in an eighteenth-round match, according to a report received from Yugoslavia.
The Icelander, who lost a pawn in defending a Ruy Lopez, resigned after forty-two moves had been recorded.
Tal, with 13-5 score, now tops the field by two points.
Paul Keres, Estonian grandmaster, drew an eighteen-move match with Tigran Petrosian, Soviet Union, a Caro-Kann defense, and remained second.
Another Ruy Lopez, between Bobby Fischer, the United States champion, and Svetozar Gligoric, Yugoslavia, resulted in a draw after forty moves.
Fischer had the white side and, after an exchange of queens, appeared to have the better position. They consumed too much time for the mid-game play and were in clock trouble toward the end.
Paul Benko, a Hungarian refugee from New York, played the King's Indian defense against Vassily Smyslov, the former world champion, whose position was superior at adjournment after forty moves.

In gaining his second victory over Paul Keres of the Soviet Union in the fifteenth round of the challengers' tournament at Zagreb, Yugoslavia, last Saturday, Bobby Fischer, the United States chess champion, capitalized on the acquisitiveness of his opponent in most effective fashion.
Keres went out of his way to capture a distant pawn. He had a chance to better his position when he yielded to the temptation of another pawn capture at his seventeenth turn.
Fischer, for his part, carried on aggressively until an oversight by Keres at the twenty-fourth move virtually brought the struggle to a close.
The score, which reached here yesterday, follows:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, October 09, 1959 - Page 38

Fischer Gains Tie In Benko Match
U.S. Champion Plays To Draw After 42 Moves in Replay of Adjourned Chess

There was no change in the positions of the eight contestants in the challengers' chess tournament in Zagreb, Yugoslavia, yesterday after four adjourned games had been played.
Bobby Fischer, the United States champion, drew his matches from the sixteenth and seventeenth rounds, according to a report received from Yugoslavia. The 16-year-old Brooklyn student remained in sixth place with a score of 8—10.
Fischer's seventeenth-round game with Paul Benko of New York was drawn by consent after forty-two moves. Then Fischer resumed play with Tigran Petrosian of the Soviet Union.
A fine struggle for superiority had marked the play during the first session, after castling on opposite sides of the board. Before adjournment each had obtained additional queens by pawn promotion and Fischer had a slight edge.
After resuming play Fischer tried to capitalize on that advantage, but Petrosian found a way out of the difficulty. A draw by perpetual check followed.
Svetozar Gligoric, Yugoslavia, won his seventeenth-round game from Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland in fifty moves. Vassily Smyslov, Soviet Union, defeated Benko in the eighteenth round in fifty-two moves.
Mikhail Tal of the Soviet Union now is leading the field by two points.
However, in his third encounter with Smyslov, a former world champion, Tal was fortunate to gain a draw by means of a perpetual check.
Smyslov, who had established two connected passed pawns on the queen's side of the board, was a piece ahead and challenged an exchange of queens. Tal had to repeatedly offer the sacrifice of his rook to end the game.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Baltimore Sun Baltimore, Maryland Friday, October 09, 1959 - Page 6

Fischer, Petrosjan In Draw
Zagreb, Yugoslavia, Oct. 8 (AP)—Bobby Fischer, the United States chess champion, drew today in his match with Soviet champion Tigran Petrosjan in the continuation of their adjourned match from the sixteenth round.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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Clarion-Ledger, Jackson, Mississippi, Saturday, October 10, 1959 - Page 8

U.S. Draws With Reds
ZAGREB, Yugoslavia (AP) — Bobby Fischer, the U.S. chess champion, drew Thursday in his match with Soviet champion Tigran Petrosjan in the continuation of their adjourned match from the 16th round.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, October 11, 1959 - Page 247

Olafsson Holds Fischer To Draw
Point Split After 40 Moves at Zagreb—Petrosian and Tal in a Deadlock

Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn and Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland drew in forty moves in the challengers chess tournament yesterday, according to a report from Zagreb, Yugoslavia.
The nineteenth-round game was their third meeting. Each had won once.
Fischer, the 16-year-old champion of the United States, conducted the black pieces selecting a Sicilian defense. His sound tactics offset the Icelander's energetic play at every stage.
A fifteen-move draw was recorded between Mikhail Tal, Soviet Union, the leader, and Tigran Petrosian, Soviet Union, fourth in the competition.
Paul Benko of New York adjourned in forty-one moves with Paul Keres, Soviet Union, and Svetozar Gligoric, Yugoslavia, adjourned in a like number of moves with Vassily Smyslov, Soviet Union.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, October 11, 1959 - Page 40

Tal Heads List In Yugoslav Tourney
Mikhail Tal was the star of the week in the Challengers' Tournament in Yugoslavia, marking up three wins and a draw to take his place at the head of the list, according to reports from the New York Times.
Tal has fared best against the lower-ranking players, winning two games each against U.S. champion Bobby Fischer, Paul Benko of New York and Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland. Examples of his play below show that Tal is a dashing, brilliant performer, going all out for victory at every move.
Paul Keres of Russia, who had led the tournament most of the way, was set back for the second time by 16-year-old Fischer. Paired in the 15th round, Fischer played the black pieces. He sacrificed a pawn to obtain the initiative. In the complexities that developed Keres missed his way and resigned after 27 moves.
Tal, with 11-5, and Keres, just below with 10½-5½, have established a wide margin over the rest of the field. Much may still happen, however, with 12 rounds to go to complete the quadruple round robin among the eight contestants.
Fischer again had a week marked by ups and downs. After defeating Olafsson in 78 moves in three sessions of their 12th-round encounter, Bobby lost to Tal in 34 moves. After a quiet opening, Tal developed threats along a diagonal, then opened the king knight's file for a decisive attack.
In the 14th round Fischer faced former world champion Vassily Smyslov of Russia, who has not shown his full strength in this event. In an even end game Fischer sacrificed the exchange in an attempt to create winning chances. He obtained two pawns in compensation, but the position became simplified and the result was a drawn battle.
After his stunning defeat of Keres, Fischer played to adjournment with Tigran Petrosian of Russia in the 16th round. Reports indicate a likely draw, which would give Fischer a total of 7-9.
Following are last week's results and games from the tournament.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin Racine, Wisconsin Sunday, October 11, 1959 - Page 36

Candidates Tournament
Paul Keres now shares the lead with Tal in the world candidates tournament now under way in Europe. Tal moved into a tie with Keres by escaping from a bad position against Smyslov and salvaging a draw, while Bobby Fischer was knocking off Keres for the second time in the tournament. Fischer beat Keres in the first round, lost to him in the eighth, and won again in the 15th. Benko drew with Gligoric, and Olafsson missed a win against Petrosian, with the likely outcome a draw. The standings after 15 rounds.

Fischer won his game from Olafsson, postponed twice since the twelfth round, in 78 moves. The game score of Fischer's 10th round win over Benko. With 13 rounds of play remaining it is conceivable that Fischer might rally strongly enough to win the event, but highly unlikely. Olafsson is making a poor showing, as is Smyslov who only a year ago at this time was winning the world championship from Botvinnik, only to lose it back last winter.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Express and News San Antonio, Texas Sunday, October 11, 1959 - Page 84

“At the last count, Bobby Fischer has a score of 4-6 in the Candidates Tournament now in progress. Behind him is Olagsson with 3½-6½ and tied with him are Smyslov and Benko, so he is in good company.
In fourth place is Gligoric with 5½-4½ and tied for second and third are Petrosian and Tal with 6-4. At the top of the heap is Keres with 7-3.
There are 18 games unplayed and no pattern has been established. Fischer is off form but not out of contention by any means.
Here is a sample of his prowess.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, October 13, 1959 - Page 49

Keres Sets Back Benko, Gligoric
Victories Keep Soviet Star in Second Place Behind Tal in Zagreb Chess

Paul Keres of the Soviet Union won both of his adjourned games yesterday in the world chess challengers' tournament at Zagreb, according to a report received through Yugoslav news sources. His two victories kept him in second place behind Mikhail Tal of the Soviet Union, who is firmly established in first place.
Without resuming play, Keres took his nineteenth-round game with Paul Benko of New York in forty-one moves. Benko had sacrificed a pawn in an English opening, but his attack petered out. Loss of a second pawn placed him at a disadvantage when he found himself in clock trouble.
Next, Keres won from Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia in the twentieth round in forty-five moves. A fine combination had netted him his opponent's queen in return for a rook and a knight.
Third place was regained by Tigran Petrosian of the Soviet Union, when he won in forty-one moves from Benko in the twentieth round. Petrosian outplayed the Hungarian refugee and captured two of his pawns.
The best exhibition of skill was given by Vassily Smyslov, the former world champion, in his nineteeth-round game with Gligoric. Smyslov conducted a splendid rook and pawn ending and won in fifty moves. As a consequence, Smyslov advanced to fourth place and the first four places are all occupied by Russians. Gligoric dropped into the second division, just ahead of Bobby Fischer, the United States champion, who is sixth with a score of 8½-11½.
The twenty-first round, bringing the Zagreb series to a conclusion, is scheduled for tonight.
The turning point in the tournament came in the seventeenth round at Zagreb when Tal defeated Keres for the first time and began his upward swing. Earlier, at Bled, Keres had defeated Tal twice. Details of this crucial match have reached here by airmail.
As usual, Keres was the aggressor and permitted his rival to capture two pawns. He then sacrificed the exchange and emerged from the complication with two minor pieces opposed to a rook. A passed pawn on the queen's file enabled Tal to win one of his opponent's pieces. With an exchange to the good, Tal had a clear road to victory.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

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Arizona Republic Phoenix, Arizona Tuesday, October 13, 1959 - Page 50

Fischer Holds Sixth
Zagreb, Yugoslavia (AP)—Bobby Fischer, young United States champion from Brooklyn, was idle yesterday as adjourned games from the 19th and 20th rounds in the International Chess Challengers Tournament were played off. He remains in sixth place with 8.5 points. Mikhail Tal of Russia, leads with 14.5.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, October 14, 1959 - Page 60

Tal and Keres Gain In Chess At Zagreb
The two Soviet stars, Mikhail Tal and Paul Keres, gained decisive victories in the twenty-first round of the challengers' chess tournament yesterday, according to a report from Yugoslavia.
In matches at Zagreb, Tal, who is first in the standing, defeated Paul Benko of New York, who is seventh; Keres, the runner-up, won from Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland, who is eighth and last. Each tail-ender had lost twice before in the tournament to the same opponent.
It took Tal, with the black pieces, thirty-three moves to dispose of Benko. Keres, also on the black side, scored in forty.
Two games were adjourned. Bobby Fischer, the United States champion, had the first move against Vassily Smyslov, a former world champion. The 16-year-old Brooklyn schoolboy made another stout stand against the famous Russian with whom he had drawn twice before at Bled.
Play ceased after five hours, with another draw considered likely. Forty-one moves had been recorded.
Smyslov had yet to lose in the Zagreb series, which ends today. The tournament will conclude with seven rounds in Belgrade.
Svetozar Gligoric, Yugoslavia, played white against Tigran Petrosian, Soviet Union and adjourned after forty-one moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, October 15, 1959 - Page 50

Smyslov Sets Back Fischer in 48 Moves At Yugoslav Chess
Vassily Smyslov, the Soviet grandmaster and a former world champion, yesterday won his adjourned game with Bobby Fischer, the United States champion, after forty-eight moves in the twenty-first round of the challengers' chess tournament at Zagreb, according to a report received from Yugoslavia.
Smyslov advanced to a tie for third place with Tigran Petrosian, one of his countrymen. Smyslov was undefeated in the series, which ended at Zagreb yesterday. He won four of his games and drew three.
Mikhail Tal of the Soviet Union, the leader, won five and drew two. Fischer, after winning one (against Paul Keres) and drawing four, dropped his last two games.
The American had drawn twice with Smyslov in the seventh and fourteenth rounds. He sacrificed a pawn against Smyslov's Sicilian defense and this handicapped him in the ending after four additional moves. Fischer remained in sixth place with a score of 8½—12½.
Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia drew in forty-one moves, by repetition, against the French defense set up by Petrosian of the Soviet Union.
After three free days, today, tomorrow and Saturday, play will be resumed at Belgrade with the twenty-second round on Sunday.
The following is the score of a game between Tigran Petrosian and Paul Keres:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, October 18, 1959 - Page 28

U.S. champion Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn retained his hold on sixth place, in which he seems secure. He drew four times in succession, starting with an adjourned 16th-round game against Tigran Petrosian of Russia. After a difficult struggle each player obtained an additional queen by promotion. Fischer had the advantage in this unusual situation, but Petrosian found a way to enforce perpetual check.
Fischer drew in rather uneventful style against Paul Benko of New York, Gligoric and Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland. He did not fare as well against Tal in the 20th round. Fischer attempted some risky counter-play with the black pieces, but was outplayed and forced to resign after 34 moves.
Following are the detailed results and games from the tournament.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, October 19, 1959 - Page 43

Tal Beats Smyslov, Lifts Lead In Chess
A notable defeat of Vassily Smyslov, a former world chess champion, enabled Mikhail Tal of the Soviet Union to increase his lead last night in the world challengers' tournament at Belgrade, according to a report from Yugoslavia.
It was the only game of the twenty-second round that reached a decision. Three games were adjourned and will be played off tomorrow.
Paul Keres of the Soviet Union, in second place with 14-7, played Bobby Fischer, the 16-year-old United States champion from Brooklyn, for the fourth time. Keres, a Latvian, played black in a Caro-Kann defense and won a pawn. With this handicap hanging over him, Fischer did well to hold out for forty-one moves but faced an uphill fight upon resumption.
Two more were adjourned after forty moves. Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland that the white side of a queen's gambit declined with Tigran Petrosian of the Soviet Union. Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia reached a fairly even knight-and-pawn ending with Paul Benko of New York.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, October 20, 1959 - Page 53

Fischer Emerges With Chess
Brooklynite Holds Petrosian Even in 30-Move Game—Smyslov Beats Keres

Bobby Fischer, facing Tigran Petrosian of the Soviet Union for the fourth time in the world challengers' chess tournament at Belgrade, drew a well-played game in thirty moves at Belgrade last night, according to a report from Yugoslavia.
The 16-year-old Brooklyn student, playing the black pieces in a queen's gambit declined, adopted the orthodox defense. Petrosian established a passed queen's pawn and exerted considerable pressure. Adequate counterplay by Fischer equalized matters.
Vasily Smyslov of Moscow passed Petrosian in the standing and took third place by defeating Paul Keres, the Estonian grandmaster, in a Sicilian defense lasting forty moves.
The most eventful game of the session was adjourned between Mikhail Tal of the Soviet Union and Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia after forty moves.
Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland won in forty-four moves from Paul Benko of New York and moved into seventh place. Benko, playing white, was outplayed in the middle game and lost a piece.
The score of Smyslov's victory over Fischer in the twenty-first round at Zagreb:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Index-Journal, Greenwood, South Carolina, Tuesday, October 20, 1959 - Page 8

BOBBY FISCHER'S GAMES OF CHESS, by Robert Fischer: “The youngest international grandmaster of chess annotates 14 or the games he played in U.S. championship tournaments. The plays of his 21 games in the Interzonal tournament of 1958 are recorded without commentary.”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, October 21, 1959 - Page 58

Keres' Careful End Game Beats Fischer in 55 Moves at Belgrade
Paul Keres of the Soviet Union, second in the challengers' chess tournament in Belgrade, defeated the United States champion, Bobby Fischer, last night in the twenty-third round, according to a report from Yugoslavia.
The fourth encounter between them was won by the Estonian in fifty-five moves. Fischer had earlier won from Keres in the first round and again the the fifteenth and held a 2-1 lead over his opponent.
The game was one of four decided yesterday. In the ending, which was difficult, Keres, a pawn to the good, had a rook and knight opposed to a rook and bishop, requiring the utmost exactitude. Keres was equal to the occasion and continued his pursuit of Mikhail Tal, Soviet Union, still leading by a good margin.
Tal was at his best in winding up his twenty-third-round game with Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia, who resigned after forty-six moves. A pawn sacrifice enabled the leader to bring about a powerful attack.
Gligoric also finished with Paul Benko of New York, a draw being recorded in fifty-seven moves. Another draw was registered, without resuming play, between Fridrik Olafsson, Iceland, and Tigran Petrosian, Soviet Union, in forty-one moves.
An abortive king's side attack by Paul Benko of New York against Mikhail Tal in the twenty-first round contributed to the advance of the Soviet grandmaster. The New Yorker surrendered a pawn on the twenty-fifth move. Benko had a bad position when, pressed for time, he blundered and lost his queen.
The score:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, October 22, 1959 - Page 50

Fischer Subdues Benko In Tourney
U.S. Champion Scores in 39 Moves in Belgrade Chess —Tal, Keres Adjourn

Bobby Fischer, the chess champion of the United States, last night tightened his hold on sixth place in the challengers' tournament in Belgrade with a victory over Paul Benko from New York.
Fischer previously had drawn against Benko in the third round, won in the tenth and drawn again in the seventeenth.
Benko, conducting the black pieces, resorted to the negative Caro-Kann defense. He was outsmarted by Fischer in the middle game, d a time limit placed him under additional disadvantage. The loss of a rook caused him to resign after thirty-nine moves.
The two leaders, Mikhail Tal and Paul Keres of the Soviet squad, clashed for the fourth time, but adjourned a queen's gambit declined after forty moves. Keres, who held a 2-1 edge on his rival, adopted the Tarrasch variation that yielded him an isolated pawn.
However, fine piece play on the part of Keres compensated him and he succeeded in capturing a pawn, with a king side attack.
A game between Vassily Smyslov and Tigran Petrosian, both of the Soviet Union, was contested for twenty-three moves in a king's Indian defense.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, October 23, 1959 - Page 38

Tal and Keres Gain Draws in Belgrade
The two leaders in the challengers' chess tournament in Belgrade each played games of less than twenty moves in the twenty-fifth round, according to a report received last night from Yugoslavia.
The Soviet Union's Mikhail Tal, still first by a margin of two and a half points, drew on the black side of a King's Indian defense in seventeen moves against Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland. The Estonian, Paul Keres, who is in second place, played the Tarrasch defense against Tigran Petrosian of the Soviet Union and drew in eighteen moves.
Vassily Smyslov, a former world champion, moved into third place after defeating Paul Benko of New York in a Catalan opening lasting thirty-four moves. The New Yorker had a good position, but lost it under time pressure when Smyslov gained the advantage of the exchange.
Bobby Fischer, the United States champion, played the Sicilian defense against Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia, who sacrificed a pawn. After forty-four moves they had reached a rook and bishop ending, likely to be drawn.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, October 24, 1959 - Page 18

Keres Downs Tal In 79-Move Game
Estonian Trims Margin of Chess Leader in Belgrade—Fischer Plays Draw

Paul Keres beat Mikhail Tal, the leader, last night for the third time in the world chess challengers' tournament, according to a report from Yugoslavia. Both are from the Soviet Union.
The Belgrade game, adjourned from the twenty-fourth round, lasted seventy-nine moves. Keres, an Estonian, had won two pawns before adjournment in a Tarrasch defense to the queen's gambit declined. However, he needed accurate play before beating Tal, a Latvian.
Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia drew in fifty-seven moves of a Sicilian defense with Bobby Fischer, the 16-year-old United States champion from Brooklyn.
Gligoric lost another game, bowing to Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland after seventy moves. Gligoric passed up a chance to draw by repetition but subsequently lost a rook under time pressure.
Keres is the only player in the eight-man tournament with a winning record against Tal. He trimmed Tal's lead to 1½ points with three rounds to play.

In gaining the lead, Tal beat Fischer three times.
He won the two games at Bled in the sixth and thirteenth rounds and again in the twentieth at Zagreb. Their fourth encounter is scheduled for Monday.
The score of the third game shows the Russian's aggressiveness at its best. He sacrificed a knight at the twenty-third move, but emerged from the combination with the advantage of the exchange and won in thirty-four moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, October 25, 1959 - Page 296

Tal Is Conceded Victor In Chess
Experts Say Soviet Player's 2½-Point Lead After 23 Rounds Is Unbeatable

After twenty-three rounds of the chess challengers' tournament at Belgrade Mikhail Tal of the Soviet Union has a clear lead of 2½ points. Critics are ready to concede first place to the interzonal winner at Portoroz. However, there remained five rounds to be played.
Tal's victory is not yet a mathematical certainty. But Tal has developed a form that has made him virtually invincible. He has control of himself and his self-confidence, next to his technical skill, is his chief attribute.
Tal's steadiness under fire and accuracy in defensive tactics were factors which enabled him to displace Paul Keres of the Soviet Union after the close of the first quarter in Bled.
Last-round upsets have occurred before and could negate the predictions for Tal's success. Because of the eleventh-hour defeat of David Bronstein of the Soviet Union at Portoroz, it was possible for the two Americans—Bobby Fischer, the United States champion, and Paul Benko—to qualify for the challengers' tournament.
That they and Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland were outclassed became evident soon after the current contest began. As was expected, the four highest places fell to the Soviet quartet.
The lone Yugoslavian, Svetozar Gligoric, holds his place on the edge between the first and second sections.
The eight contestants rested yesterday.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, October 25, 1959 - Page 80

“…Tal's margin has been amassed mainly against the four non-Russians in the tournament against whom he has scored an amazing tally of 12 wins and one draw. He has taken three points each from U.S. champion Bobby Fischer, Benko and Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland. Gligoric obtained one draw in four ties.
Paul Keres of Estonia, who has been in second place for some time, remains in that position with 15-8. He defeated Olafsson and Fischer but was set back by Smyslov in the 23rd round. Smyslov moved up to tie for third with Tigran Petrosian of Russia.
Fischer, 16-year-old Brooklyn schoolboy who is gaining invaluable experience in this battle of the grandmasters, registered but one draw in his three games last week. In the 21st round he was matched against Smyslov, who used a Sicilian Defense. Fischer sacrificed a pawn, then a piece, and developed a strong attack. Smyslov had enough resources, however, and won in a rook-and-pawn ending.
Paired with Keres in the 22nd round, Fischer went into a long second session, having lost a pawn before adjournment. Keres had a rook and knight opposed ot a rook and bishop. It took exact play to enforce the win and Keres was equal to the occasion.
Against Petrosian, who had beaten him twice previously, Fischer adopted the Orthodox Defense to the Queen's Gambit. Petrosian established a passed queen's pawn and exerted considerable pressure. Adequate counterplay by Fischer equalized matters and a draw resulted after 30 moves.
Following are last week's results and games from the event:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Sunday Gazette-Mail Charleston, West Virginia Sunday, October 25, 1959 - Page 63

“With but five of the 28 rounds remaining in the challengers tournament in Belgrade, Yugoslavia, Mikhail Tal of the Soviet Union had a commanding lead. Tal's score was 17½ to 5½, a good 2½ points ahead of second place Paul Keres; who in turn was 2½ points in front of Tigran Petrosian and Vassily Smyslov, tied with identical 12½ to 10½ records. So the four places continue to be in the hands of the four Russian representatives — two brilliant and talented young masters and two experienced and resourceful veterans, grandmasters all.
★ ★ ★
THE 16-YEAR-OLD champion of the United States, Bobby Fischer, now has a 9 to 14 record, good enough for sixth place in this eight-player battle of the chess giants.
Fischer lost in round 23 to Keres, giving Bobby a 2 to 2 record against the Soviet grandmaster.
American chess followers are disappointed to see their young prodigy-champion fare so poorly, but even to qualify for that event was quite an achievement, and a round robin tournament of this kind separates the men from the boys.
Our champion, good as he undoubtedly is, needs a little more seasoning before he can play for the championship of the world.
Bobby will be back.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Journal Times Racine, Wisconsin Sunday, October 25, 1959 - Page 11

Candidates Tournament
“In his 21st-round game with Bobby Fischer, with whom he had drawn in the seventh and 14th rounds, he played a beautifully calculated defensive game after winning a pawn earlier, and managed to stay just one step ahead of Fischer's threatened attack.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, October 26, 1959 - Page 37

Tal And Petrosian Play Draw In Chess
Mikhail Tal's lead was reduced to a point last night in the twenty-sixth round of the chess challengers' tournament in Belgrade. The Soviet player drew with Tigran Petrosian, Soviet Union, in twenty-five moves according to a report from Yugoslavia.
The result left Tal with a score of 18½—7½. Paul Keres, Soviet Union, defeated Paul Benko of New York in twenty-three moves to remain in second place with 17½—8½.
Tal played white against a Sicilian defense and sacrificed a rook to obtain access to the black king. Petrosian counterattacked and forced a draw by perpetual check in twenty-five moves. Keres won in twenty-three moves against Benko's Sicilian defense. The New Yorker weakened his king side pawns and succumbed to a sharp attack.
Bobby Fischer, the United States champion, played white against a Caro Kann defense adopted by Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland. An adjournment was taken after forty-one moves.
Vasily Smyslov, Soviet Union, lost to the King's Indian defense adopted by Svetozar Gligoric, Yugoslavia, in eighteen moves. The Russian grandmaster weakened his king side pawns in an advance.
Two rounds remain to be played.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, October 27, 1959 - Page 44

Fischer And Tal Adjourn In Chess
Belgrade Game Halts After 41 Moves—Keres Holds Advantage Over Gligoric

With all four of the games adjourned in the twenty-seventh and semi-final round of the chess challengers' tournament last night, no changes took place in the standing, according to a report from Belgrade. The games will be played off today.
The fourth encounter between Bobby Fischer, the United States champion, and Mikhail Tal of the Soviet Union was dramatic and closely watched throughout the five-hour session.
The enthusiastic crowd of 2,000 was about evenly divided in sympathy between these opponents. It was up to the 16-year-old Brooklyn student to stop the Latvian, who was leading by a full point over Paul Keres of the Soviet Union.
Fischer had lost three straight to Tal. This time, he was equal to the occasion and put on a great show. He attacked courageously against the Sicilian defense set up by Tal and sacrificed a pawn and a piece to get the black king out into the middle of the board.
Certain defeat appeared to be in store for Tal, but he obtained respite when a move of the queen, instead of a rook, provided a chance to equalize. Once out of danger, Tal improve his prospects and was thought to have winning chances when play stopped after forty-one moves.
Meanwhile, Keres, contested a Nimzo-Indian defense with Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia, who unnecessarily sacrificed a pawn at an early stage. The Estonian clung to his advantage and, after forty-one moves, had the better of a rook-and-pawn ending.
Clock trouble bothered both Paul Benko of New York and Tigran Petrosian of the Soviet Union in a queen's gambit, but they were on even terms after forty-three moves.
Vassily Smyslov of the Soviet Union, playing black in an English opening with Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland, had slightly the better of the ending after forty-one moves.

Following are specimens of Fischer's play in the tournament:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, October 28, 1959 - Page 45

Tal Beats Fischer And Retains Lead
Latvian Wins in 52 Moves and Nears Chess Prize With One Round Left

Mikhail Tal and Paul Keres, Soviet grandmasters, were still first and second, respectively, in the challengers' chess tournament at Belgrade last night after the completion of twenty-seven rounds, according to a report from Yugoslavia.
Both played adjoined games, with Tal remaining a point ahead of Keres after defeating Bobby Fischer, the United States champion, in fifty-two moves. Tal has a score of 19½-7½, Keres 18½-8½.
With only one more round to be contested, Tal needs merely to draw his final game with Paul Benko of New York in order to emerge as the challenger for the world title held by Mikhail Botvinnik of the Soviet Union.
Keres can tie Tal for the lead in the final round if he wins from Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland, and if Tal loses to Benko, a Hungarian refugee. Thus far Benko has lost three times to Tal, who is a Latvian.
Tal Keeps Slate Clean
Tal's victory in his adjourned twenty-seventh-round game with Fischer made his score 4—0 against the Brooklyn chess prodigy. The Latvian player was reported to have been fortunate in surviving the onslaught by Fischer and had the better prospects at the end of the first session. Upon resumption, Tal won a pawn and had fairly smooth sailing after that.
Four of the unfinished games were decided without further play. In one of them, Keres accepted the resignation of Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia after forty-one moves.
Fischer won his twenty-sixth-round match with Olafsson, which had gone to forty-one moves, in a similar fashion. His final score with the Icelander found him ahead, 2½—1½.
Olafsson also lost in forty-one moves to Vassily Smyslov of the Soviet Union in a twenty-seventh-round match. The game between Benko and Tigran Petrosian, of the U.S.S.R., was recorded as a draw in forty-three moves.
Last Round Tomorrow
The pairings for the twenty-eighth round, scheduled to start tomorrow:
Tal vs. Benko, Petrosian vs. Gligoric, Keres vs. Olafsson and Smyslov vs. Fischer. Those first in each pairing will play white.
By winning in their fourth encounter in the tournament, Keres tied Fischer at 2-2.
The score:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Guardian London, Greater London, England Wednesday, October 28, 1959 - Page 10

Fischer's fine play against Tal in chess tournament
Belgrade, October 27.
Two intensely exciting games have transformed the final stages of the candidates' tournament for the world chess championship—that in which the former world champion Smyslov, playing White, lost to the Yugoslav, Gligoric, in eighteen moves and that in which Bobby Fischer, the United States prodigy, playing a superb attack, nearly humbled the leader, the almost invincible Tal.
Smyslov's play in his 26th round game was incredibly bad. Here is the game:

The Fischer-Tal excitement began when Fischer launched his onslaught. He gave up a pawn so as to keep Tal's centre open and then a piece with the same object. Just when it seemed that his attack could not fail he overlooked a clear win. Tal made up ground and at the adjournment had a won ending.
The other games in Round 27 were also adjourned—Gligoric v. Keres, Benkö v. Petrosian, and Olafsson v. Smyslov. Keres and Smyslov should win.
The scores are Tal (USSR) 18½ and one adjourned, Keres (USSR) 17½ and one adjourned, Petrosian and Smyslov (USSR) 14 and one adjourned, Fischer (U.S.A.) 10½ and two adjourned, Olafsson (Iceland) 9 and two adjourned. Benkö (stateless) 7 and one adjourned.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, October 30, 1959 - Page 24

Tal Takes Challengers' Chess With a Draw in Closing Match
Latvian and Benko Halt After 22 Moves in Yugoslavia—Fischer Beats Smyslov

Mikhail Tal, a 24-year-old Latvian member of the Soviet team of four in the challengers' chess tournament, emerged last night as the winner, according to a report from Yugoslavia.
Starting the twenty-eighth and final round at Belgrade with a 1-point lead over Paul Keres of the Soviet Union, Tal drew with Paul Benko, a Hungarian refugee who lives in New York, in twenty-two moves. Tal's final score was 20-8, based on sixteen games won, four lost and eight drawn.
Tal qualified to play for the world championship against Mikhail Botvinnik of Moscow. They will contest twenty-four games in the Soviet Union next year on dates to be named by the International Chess Federation.
Benko, with the black pieces, set up a Sicilian defense against Tal. In the play, Tal captured two pawns, after which Benko agreed to draw. Tal needed only a draw to win the tournament. Fischer Plays Well
A much finer performance was that of Bobby Fischer, the 16-year-old United States champion from Brooklyn. On the black side of a Sicilian defense, he defeated Vasily Smyslov, a former world champion.
His opponent's king-side attack came to naught and Fischer turned the tables in his own good time after forty-four moves.
Fischer remained in sixth place and may tie with Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia for fifth. Gligoric played the king's Indian defense against Tigran Petrosian of the Soviet Union. The outcome was doubtful when adjournment took place after forty-one moves.
Keres also adjourned in forty-one moves with Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland, who was considered to have winning chances when play stopped.
The final standing will depend upon the outcome of the two unfinished games to be played tonight.
Connected Pawns Decide
The tireless persistence of which chess masters are capable when the occasion requires was well demonstrated in the twenty-fourth round when Keres defeated Tal in seventy-nine moves.
Both kings went far afield to participate in the struggle. A position was reached in which two connected pawns decided the issue.
The score:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Courier-Journal Louisville, Kentucky Friday, October 30, 1959 - Page 34

“Mikhail Tal, Latvian grand master, won the World Chess Challenger's Tournament at Belgrade, Yugoslavia. Bobby Fischer of the U.S. moved into sixth place.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Indianapolis News Indianapolis, Indiana Friday, October 30, 1959 - Page 16

CHESS
Mikhail Tal, 23-year-old Latvian grand master, won the world challengers tournament at Belgrade. This earned him the right to meet world champion Mikhail Botvinnik, Russian grand master, for the title next year. Bobby Fischer, the 16-year-old grand master from New York, defeated former world champion Vasil Smyslov for sixth place.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, October 31, 1959 - Page 22

New Chess Challenger
Congratulations are undoubtedly pouring in on Mikhail Tal, the 24-year-old Latvian who has won the international challengers' chess tournament in Yugoslavia, thus gaining the right to play Mikhail Botvinnik, the present world champion, for the title next year. It was a brilliant performance under grueling conditions.
Our own Bobby Fischer finished with a score of 12½ games won against 15½ lost. This was an enormously impressive performance for a 16-year-old lad playing against the world's best players. And the fact that Bobby chalked up victories against such formidable opponents as Paul Keres and Vasily Smyslov, the second and fourth place winners in the tournament, adds to the luster of his achievement.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, October 31, 1959 - Page 20

Petrosian Takes Final Chess Game
Sets Back Gligoric to Finish Third—Soviet Foursome Sweeps Top Places

Tigran Petrosian of the Soviet Union beat Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia in forty-five moves to finish third in the world chess challengers' tournament, according to a report yesterday from Belgrade.
Gligoric dropped into a tie for fifth with Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn.
Paul Keres of Estonia, who already had clinched second place, could not recover from a bad position in his adjourned twenty-eighth-round game with Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland. The Icelander, without resuming play, scored in forty-one moves.
Vassily Smyslov of Moscow wound up fourth and, with Mikhail Tal of Latvia No. 1 on the list following his draw with Paul Benko on Thursday, the four top places went to the Soviet grand masters.
The game Tal had won from Fischer in the twenty-seventh round kept the crowd of 2,000 on edge during the five-hour session.
The United States champion started the fireworks early by giving up a pawn. Next he offered a knight, which was refused. Then he held out the lure of a bishop. Still Tal wouldn't bite.
Complications increased as play progressed. Fischer constantly harassed the black king; consequently Tal could not castle.
When play was resumed, Tal won with rook and bishop opposed to a rook. The score follows:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

This article also appears in,

Asbury Park Press Asbury Park, New Jersey Saturday, October 31, 1959 - Page 9

Fischer 5th In Chess Tournament
Belgrade (AP)—Bobby Fischer, 16, the world's youngest chess Grand Master and champion of the United States, yesterday became symbolically the world's best chess player from the Western Hemisphere.
This is result of the last match played yesterday at the Challengers Chess Tournament in which Soviet Grand Master Tigran Petrosjan defeated Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia in their adjourned match from the 28th and last round played Thursday.
The defeat of Gligoric enabled New Yorker Fischer, who Thursday defeated Vasil Smyslov of the Soviet Union, to share the fifth and sixth place with 12.5 points.
Smyslov Places 4th
Thanks to the victory over Gligoric, Petrosjan captured the third place before his countryman, former world champion Vasil Smyslov, who took fourth.
The placement of Fischer is considered here as a success for the wonder boy from America.
The winner of the tournament, Mikhail Tal, of Latvia, obtained the right to challenge next March present world champion Mikhail Botvinnik for the title.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Journal Times Racine, Wisconsin Sunday, November 01, 1959 - Page 34

World Candidates Tournament
Mikhail Tal lost ½ point of his 1½ point lead in round 26 as he drew with Petrosian while Paul Keres was winning from Pal Benko of the U.S. but Tal will be hard to beat since he faces Benko and Fischer in the final two rounds, with Benko in particular being badly outclassed in the select field. The standings after 26 rounds: …
Late Report: Tal won from Bobby Fischer in their 27th round game, and now needs only a draw with Benko in the final rounds to clinch the candidates title.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, November 01, 1959 - Page 46

Tal Point Ahead In Challengers' Chess
Soviet grandmaster Mikhail Tal, in a comparative slump last week, is still one point ahead with one round to play in the Challengers' Tournament, in Yugoslavia, according to a report from the New York Times.
Paul Keres of Estonia, starting a determined comeback, defeated Tal in a fine end game lasting 79 moves in the 24th round. In the 26th round Keres gained further ground by downing Paul Benko of new York while Tal was held to a draw by Tigran Petrosian of Russia.
In the 27th round Tal was paired with 16-year-old Bobby Fischer, U.S. chess champion for the last two years. Fischer, who had lost three straight to Tal, attacked vigorously with the white pieces, sacrificing a pawn and a piece to force the black king into the middle of the board.
Cetain defeat appeared to be in store for Tal, but he obtained a respite when Fischer weakened, allowing a chance to equalize. Once out of danger, Tal improved his position just before adjournment. In the second session Tal won a pawn and scored the vital point after 52 moves.
In the same round Keres defeated Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia to score 3½-½ for the week, leaving him still an outside chance to tie for first. The final round pairings are Tal vs. Benko, Keres vs. Olafsson, Petrosian vs. Gligoric and Smyslov vs. Fischer.
Fischer started the week with a victory over Benko. The game was evenly contested in the early part. Fischer was gaining the upper hand when Benko, in severe time trouble, overlooked the loss of a rook to end the game in 39 moves.
In the 25th round Fischer played the Sicilian Defense against Gligoric. The latter sacrificed a pawn, which proved sound enough but netted no advantage. The game drifted into a rook and pawn ending, which was drawn after 57 moves.
Fischer solidified his position in sixth place by outplaying Fridrik Olafsson of Iceland, with whom he had previously had an even score in three encounters. Fischer built up an advantage by adjournment time and Olafsson resigned without resuming play.
Following are last week's results and a selection of games from the tournament.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Indianapolis News, Indianapolis, Indiana, Tuesday, November 03, 1959 - Page 15

SPORT SHORTS
CHESS
Bobby Fischer, 16, the world's youngest grand master and champion of the United States, is symbolically the best player from the Western Hemisphere. The last match completed in the world challengers tournament at Belgrade in which Russian grand master Tigran Petrosjan defeated Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia enabled New Yorker Fischer to share fifth place in the final standings. Mikhail Tal of Latvia finished first with 20 points, Paul Keres of Russia, second with 18.5; Petrosjan, third with 16.5, and Vasil Smyslov of Russia, fourth with 15. Fischer and Gligoric tied for fifth with 12.5 each.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Fort Lauderdale News Fort Lauderdale, Florida Sunday, November 01, 1959 - Page 24

In the Candidates Tournament now taking place in Yugoslavia, eight of the world's greatest players are battling it out for the honor of challenging Mikhail Botvinnik for his world title.
Latest report from the mental arena shows the following scores with three rounds yet to be played.

The four leaders are Russians, proving once again that nation's supremacy in the world of chess. Many of Bobby Fischer's supporters will be disappointed by his showing in this event. Yet they must remember that he is only 15 and he is competing against some of the greatest players of all time.
Even if the American prodigy only places sixth, it will be a feat unsurpassed in the annals of chess history. I firmly believe that he will be world champion by the time he is 21.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The News Journal Wilmington, Delaware Monday, November 02, 1959 - Page 18

Russia's National Game
IF Russian successes in particular fields didn't serve to shake our complacency once in a while, our defense against Soviet cold-war tactics would be poorer than it is. But the Russians, for all their boasting, are less complacent than we are. They know that they have surpassed us in rocketry and a few other important fields, but they also know how far behind us they are in others. One reason for our excess of complacency is that we know it too—but fail to appreciate how rapidly the Russians are beginning to gain on us.
Yet the Russians do make the most of their successes generally, even in sports. Just as Hitler was prone to hail every track or field victory of his Nordic stalwarts as proof that Germans were a master race and Nazism its perfect flower, so the Communists have hailed their unofficial victories in the Olympics—victories made possible only through the showing of their brawny woman athletes—as if they somehow proved that Marx and Lenin were right.
In sports as in industry, the trick is to publicize victories and to avoid seeming to compete where victory is not yet possible. Thus the Russians have hardly been heard of in international competition in tennis, say, or in duplicate bridge. We are expected to believe that their failure to make a flashy showing in these sports is not due to any Marxist-Leninist weakness, but merely to lack of interest.
There is another game in which, curiously enough, the Russians don't boast excessively of their supremacy, and that is chess. Chess is the Russian national game, practically. It always has been; but only under Communism, with its government aid to outstanding grandmasters, has the world championship become a Russian monopoly.
Present titleholder is Botvinnik, a Russian. A few years ago he lost the title to Smyslov, another Russian, and then regained it.
The main challengers for his crown are also Russians. Every couple of years a challengers tournament is held whose winner plays the champion a 24-game match for the title. A Russian has always won that event. In the 1959 competition the winner was 24-year-old Mikhail Tal, and other Russians finished second, third and fourth. The American entrant, Bobby Fischer, was sixth of the eight contestants. Even that was a good showing for a 16-year-old. He was a close second among the four non-Russians, and in the 28-game event he racked up wins against former champion Smyslov and against Paul Keres, another Russian citizen whom some analysts consider the world's most brilliant player. If Bobby Fischer continues to improve, the Russians may have to look to their chess laurels.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Daily Tribune, Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin, Saturday, November 07, 1959 - Page 3

”Bobby Fischer's Games of Chess” by Robert Fischer—Brings together a wide variety of information on chess terminology, play, players, publications and organizations.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Sunday Gazette-Mail Charleston, West Virginia Sunday, November 08, 1959 - Page 62

THE PLAYERS' final standing in the world chess challengers' tournament, held in Yugoslavia (Bled, Zagreb, Belgrade) was as follows: Tal 20 to 8: Keres, 18½ to 9½: Petrosian, 15½ to 12½: Smyslov, 15 to 13: Fischer and Gligoric, each 12½ to 15½: Olafsson 10 to 18: Benko, 8 to 20.
So we find the players from the Soviet Union capturing the first four places, all with plus scores, as against four contestants. There was a clear gap of 2½ points between fourth and fifth positions.
The Soviet grandmasters (a Latvian, an Estonian, an Armenian and also a Russian clearly outclassed the rest of the field. However, it must be kept in mind that it was no small feat to even qualify for this challengers' tourney.
The showing of young Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, the United States chess champion, was disappointing to his ardent chess following. But when one considers that the boy is only 16 years old it must be conceded that he did not do so badly. Bobby undoubtedly learned much about top-flight tournament play. If he continues to improve, as he certainly should, he quite probably will one day be world chess champion (defeating Tal in the title-match?)
This Mikhail Tal, by the way, is quite a chess player. Only 22, he has already won some important chess events, including the championship of the USSR and the strong interzonal tournament at Portoroz last year. He beat Fischer all four games in the challengers' tourney — but he lost three out of four to the veteran Paul Keres, runner-up.
THIS CHALLENGERS' event saw some real competitive chess: the players were evidently out to win and “grandmaster draws” were something of a rarity. Probably the percentage of drawn games was smaller than in any comparable event in years. While Tal should rightly receive all due praise as the winner, it is well too to applaud the extraordinary performance of the veteran Keres. One of the oldest (if not the oldest) of the contestants, he was one - two throughout practically the entire grueling 28-round event.
Probably he realized that he is unlikely ever to come so close again to a crack at the world's chess crown. Another interesting point. How would Samuel Reshevsky have fared in this event in Fischer's place? Probably better: he would hardly have ended up 7½ points out of first place.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Fort Lauderdale News Fort Lauderdale, Florida Sunday, November 08, 1959 - Page 24

Bobby Fischer of the United States and Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia tied for fifth and six places. Fredrich Olafsson of Icleand came in seventh, and Paul Benko, formerly of Hungary and now of the USA, was eighth.
It is refreshing to note that there were very few “grandmaster draws” in this clash of the chess world's elite. In spite of cynical forecasts that the Russians would collaborate so that one of their countrymen would win, they battled each other just as fiercely as they did the others.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Journal Times Racine, Wisconsin Sunday, November 15, 1959 - Page 38

Candidates Game
Candidates tournament winner Mikhail Tal owes much of his victory to the fact that he scored 4-0 over U.S. champ Bobby Fischer in their four games. Paul Keres, who finished second, split with Fischer, winning two and losing two with no draws. Here is one of Keres' wins over Fischer:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Pittsburgh Press Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Thursday, December 03, 1959 - Page 2

American artist Arthur Elliot would like to give President Eisenhower one of his specially-designed space-age chess sets either to keep or present as a gift to Russian Premier Nikita S. Khruschchev.
Mr. Elliot, 46, now living in Rome, has given one of his sets to U.S. chess champion Bobby Fischer, 15, of Brooklyn.
He said he thought the set would be an unusual gift for the President to take along to Moscow next year.
In Mr. Elliot's set, the king is a space station, the queen a space ship and the castle a radar station.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, December 06, 1959 - Page 60

U.S. Chess Championship
The tournament for the U.S. chess championship and the Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy will be held in New York from Dec. 18 to Jan. 3. A round robin will be contested among 12 of the leading American masters.
Bobby Fischer, 16-year-old Brooklyn schoolboy who has held the title for the last two years, will be favored to retain the championship. He recently returned from Yugoslavia, where he tied with Svetozar Gligoric for fifth place in the powerful Challengers' Tournament.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, December 11, 1959 - Page 42

Chess Group Balks At Fischer Demand
Bobby Fischer, the 16-year-old United States chess champion, had until Sunday to reconsider his refusal to play in this year's championship unless the pairings are redrawn in his presence.
A five-man committee of the United States Chess Federation and The American Chess foundation, co-sponsors of the tournament, decided last night that Fischer would have to abide by the pairings or be replaced in the tournament.
Fischer, the youngest international grandmaster in history, has dominated the American chess scene in the past two years. He has competed three times in the annual national tournament and won it in his last two attempts.
In each of the tournaments that Fischer has appeared in, numbers were assigned to the players and pairings were made without the competitors being present. Fischer, a student at Erasmus Hall High School, never had complained before.
Morris J. Kasper, the president of the Manhattan Chess Club and chairman of the tournament committee, last night said that notifications of the pairings had been sent to twelve players earlier this month.
On Dec. 7 Hans Kmoch, the tournament director, received a letter from Fischer stating that the young player would not participate unless the pairings were redrawn in his presence, according to Kasper.
Kmoch wrote to Fischer the same day telling him that he would have to abide by the pairings or withdraw.
Since each of the twelve players meet one another once, the pairings merely assign the order of meeting.
“We would love to have Bobby play,” said Kasper, “but we can't change the pairings. We can't set a precedent whereby each player can demand a redrawing.”

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Sunday Gazette-Mail Charleston, West Virginia Sunday, December 13, 1959 - Page 62

The U.S Chess Championship Tournament gets under way in New York City next Friday, December 18. The following entries are definite: Arthur Bisguier, James T. Sherwin, Sidney Bernstein, Herbert Seidman, Arnold Denker, Pal Benko, Edmar Mednis, Raymond Weinstein, Robert Byrne, Robin Ault. Two big names are missing from that list but it is assumed that they will compete: grandmasters Bobby Fischer (defending U.S. title-holder) and Samuel Reshevsky. Missing also is William Lombardy, one of the strongest of the younger U.S. masters and winner of the recent Log Cabin Silver Anniversary Tournament, but Lombardy is now studying in the priesthood.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Journal Times Racine, Wisconsin Sunday, December 13, 1959 - Page 23

Fischer-Tal
Bobby Fischer had more than his share of troubles against Candidates Tournament winner Tal, failing to gain even a draw in four games. One reason might be Fischer's adherence to his favorite 6. B-QB4 in the Sicilian, which Tal had little trouble in refuting. The moved is considered questionable by many authorities on the opening and Tal seemingly confirmed this against Fischer.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, December 16, 1959 - Page 61

Fischer Dropped From Title Chess in Pairings Dispute
Officials Reject Youth's Demands
Fischer, ’59 Winner, Out of U.S. Event After Insisting on Redraw of Pairings

Bobby Fischer, the 16-year-old chess champion of the United States, will be just another kibitzer for this year's national tournament. It became official yesterday that he would not compete in the event which starts here Friday.
Fischer described his differences with the United States Chess Federation and the American Chess Foundation as “a matter of principle.” It began when he was notified by mail of the pairings for the tournament.
The Brooklyn high school student insisted that the pairings be redrawn in public. This, he said, was the custom in European competition and was required under international rules.
A five-man committee of the federation and foundation, the co-sponsors of the event, refused last Friday to change the rule, which had been in effect in all five previous tournaments. The committee gave Fischer until last Sunday to change his stand.
Negotiations a Stalemate
The deadline was later extended but, according to Maurice J. Kasper, treasurer of the foundation, negotiations yesterday with Bobby and his mother, Mrs. Regina Fischer, a nurse, produced no results.
The sponsors pointed out that they had no objections to a public drawing and that they would in fact be happy to have one for next year's tournament. However, they declined to set up a new drawing this year.
“It is a completely minor point,” said Hans Kmoch, the director of the tournament. “It has never come up in previous tournaments, and Bobby played in three of them.”
Fischer had won two straight national championships. In the previous tournament, which ended early last January, he posted a score of 8½—2½.
Meanwhile, Fischer's replacement in the field of twelve was announced. He is Anthony F. Saidy of Douglastown, Queens, a 22-year-old student at the Cornell Medical School. Saidy, rated as a national master, played on United States college teams in Sweden, Iceland and Bulgaria.
His opponent in the opening round will be Arthur S. Bisguier, a former national titleholder.
The tournament will start at the West Side Y.M.C.A. and matches will take place later at the Manhattan and Marshall Chess Clubs. Play in the round-robin ends Jan. 3.
A Frequent Dissenter
Fischer, who first achieved chess prominence at 13, has frequently been at odds with chess authorities. He and his mother have often criticized the financial arrangements made for leading players by the chess foundation.
The youth noted that he had refused to agree to the details of a fund-raising campaign to finance his trip to the world challengers' tournament in Yugoslavia earlier this year.
The cost of the trip, put at $3,500, was paid by Mrs. Fischer, a nurse who is divorced from Bobby's father, and in part by previous tournament winnings.
Mrs. Fischer asserted that the foundation, a money-raising group, was primarily interested in obtaining backing for Samuel Reshevsky, who is, like Fischer, an international grandmaster. She states that Bobby never accepted funds from the foundation.
However, Kasper stated last night that Bobby had received a check for $250 from the foundation in 1958 “as a gift for playing chess.”
Money frequently has been a cause of chess disputes here. In Europe the game is popular enough to permit the leading experts to count on at least a modest living from purses.
This is not the case in this country. Some leading players are nto competing in this year's national tournament because they are unable to leave their work for two weeks in the hopes of winning a major prize and their requests for guarantees were turned down.
A total purse of $3,000 is offered for the tournament, with first and second prizes of $1,000 and $500. The Lessing J. Rosenwald and Frank Marshall trophies are also at stake.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, December 17, 1959 - Page 54

Replacement Sides With Fischer Stand
Bobby Fischer, the national chess champion, who was dropped from this year's tournament after a dispute on the pairings, was supported in his stand yesterday by his replacement.
Anthony F. Saidy of Douglaston, Queens said, “I do not think the tournament has been set up according to international procedure. I'm participating, however, because it's an opportunity I wouldn't want to miss.”
Fischer, from Brooklyn, disagreed with a five-man committee which made the pairings and then notified the contestants. Fischer claimed a public drawing should have taken place, with the contestants attending. This, he said, is required by international chess rules.
The committee and Fischer couldn't resolve the difference and Saidy was picked to replace Fischer. The tournament starts tomorrow at the West Side Y.M.C.A.
Fischer has taken part in three national championship tourneys, winning the last two. Each was conducted without a public drawing of pairings.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, December 19, 1959 - Page 24

Fischer Yields and Re-Enters U.S. Title Chess
Champion Drops Pairings Dispute
Fischer Regains Place in Title Chess Tournament When Saidy Withdraws

Bobby Fischer, the tempestuous Brooklyn high school student, will defend his national chess title after all.
The 16-year-old Fischer had withdrawn from the tournament on Tuesday in a dispute over the way the pairings for the twelve-man round-robin were drawn.
On Thursday he had a change of heart and yesterday this was communicated to the sponsoring United States Chess Federation and the American Chess Foundation through an intermediary.
Last night, at the West Side Y.M.C.A. the blond, gangling youth who is rated by many as the best chess player in the Western Hemisphere was hunched over his board in his first-round match with Arthur Bisguier of Elmhurst, Queens.
Anthony F. Saidy of Douglaston, Queens, who had been named as Fischer's replacement, withdrew to make way for Bobby's return.
Saidy a Medical Student
Saidy, 22, is a student at Cornell Medical School and the son of Fred Saidy, co-author of the books for “Finian's Rainbow,” “Bloomer Girl,” and other Broadway successes.
The last-minute switch was engineered by Jerry Spann of Oklahoma City, president of the chess federation.
“I thought it was very important to make every effort to smooth out the difficulties since Bobby was the defending champion,” Spann said, “but he had to make the first move.”
The drawing for the tournament, which determines the order in which the players meet one another and the color they play, was conducted by a five-man committee here and the players were notified by mail.
Fischer, who earlier this year competed in the world challengers' tournament in Yugoslavia, protested. He demanded that the pairings be redrawn in public the day before the tournament, as is the custom in Europe.
Change Due Next Year
“We'll be very happy to hold the drawing in public next year,” Spann stated. “In fact we've never had any objections to doing it. The point simply never came up before.
“When Bobby brought it up the drawing already had been made and we didn't feel that it ought to be done again. Time was growing short, for one thing.”
Spann, a slow-talking former football-player at the University of Southern California in the early Nineteen Thirties, had high praise for Saidy.
“He had been looking forward to playing, I know,” Spann said. “But when I called and asked him, as a personal favor, to withdraw he did so immediately.”
Saidy, who was present as an onlooker, smiled ruefully. “I had been out of bed only about three minutes when Jerry called,” I guess I wasn't thinking too clearly when I said I'd drop out.”
The sprinkling of spectators in the Y's auditorium applauded when Maurice J. Kasper, treasurer of the chess foundation, announced Fischer would play.
Bobby lounged against a side wall, chatting with some of the other players, while waiting for the competition to begin. Asked why he had decided to play, all he would say was, “I just changed my mind, that's all.”
Fischer Adjourns
Fischer was held on fairly even terms by Bisguier and they adjourned after forty-one moves early this morning.
Raymond Weinstein of Brooklyn defeated Robin Ault of Cranford, N.J. in forty moves. Weinstein is a former national junior champion, the title now held by Ault.
Edmar Mednis of New York University and Pal Benko, a Hungarian refugee now living here, drew in thirty-seven moves. Benko played a Sicilian defense.
Herbert Seidman of Brooklyn, a former intercollegiate champion, defeated Arnold Denker of East Rockaway, Queens, in forty-four moves. James T. Sherwin of New York, a former state champion, and Robert Byrne of Valparaiso, Ind., adjourned after forty-four moves.
In a match played last Sunday, Samuel Reshevsky, like Fischer an international grandmaster, defeated Sidney Bernstein.
Having drawn the white pieces against Bisguier, Fischer was called upon to deal with the old-fashioned Petroff defense, so popular in the late Eighteen Nineties, when Pillsbury was its chief exponent. With 7, QxQch, simplification set in to some extent, both castling on the queen's side of the board.
Fischer retained the initiative, but Bisguier, at his nineteenth turn, capture a central pawn, challenging an exchange of bishops, which the champion accepted. The loss of the pawn was only momentary. Other pawn captures came in quick succession, but Fischer emerged advantageously with a passed pawn on the king knight's file. His three pawns on the other wing blocked a black quarter. In return Bisguier had a rook on the seventh rank and a knight opposed to a bishop.
Experts believed that the United States champion held a good edge.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, December 20, 1959 - Page 141

Chess
The spotlight in the year's chess activities was monopolized largely by Bobby Fischer, a 16-year-old student at Erasmus Hall High School in Brooklyn.
Fischer started 1959 by retaining the United States championship and the Lessing J. Rosenwald Challenge Trophy. He again outranked Samuel Reshevsky, five-time holder of the title, and Arthur B. Bisguier, an ex-champion.
A South American trip took Fischer to Argentina and Chile. At Mar del Plata, Argentina, he tied for third place with Boris Ivkov of Yugoslavia, half a point below Miguel Najdorf of Argentina and Ludek Pachman of Czechoslovakia.
At Santiago, where Pachman and Ivkov were co-winners, Fischer tied for third with Herman Pilnik and Raul Sanguinetti of Argentina.
Fischer's next effort—in the Jubilee tournament at Zurich—once more resulted in a third-place tie, this time with Paul Keres of Estonia. Mikhail Tal of Latvia was first and Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia second.
In the eight-week world challengers' tournament in Yugoslavia, the eight qualifiers played twenty-eight rounds at Bled, Zagreb and Belgrade. Tal won and will meet Mikhail Botvinnik for the world championship next year. Fischer and Gligoric tied for fifth and sixth places, below four Soviet grandmasters.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, December 20, 1959 - Page 28

Reshevsky Wins First Game In Title Tourney
The first victory in the tournament for the U.S. chess championship and the Lessing J. Rosenwald challenge trophy was scored by former champion Samuel Reshevsky of Spring Valley, N.Y. against Sidney Bernstein of Brooklyn.
The game was played in advance of the regularly scheduled first round to avoid playing on the Jewish Sabbath, which Reshevsky observes.
Bernstein attempted a king-side demonstration, which led to nothing. Superior tactics gave Reshevsky an endgame advantage, which he clinched by establishing and forcing through a distant passed pawn.
At the moment of writing it is uncertain whether the brilliant defending champion, 16-year-old Bobby Fischer, will participate in the tournament.
He objected to the fact that pairings were made and the schedule arranged without the competitors being present.
In most tournaments the players draw numbers and the schedule is then set. But for several years the committee representing the U.S. Chess representing the U.S. Chess Federation and the American Chess Foundation, co-sponsors of the tournament, has prepared the schedule some time in advance. No one, including Fischer, had ever complained before.
Fischer is matched in the first round with former U.S. champion Arthur B. Bisguier. Other first-round pairings, for play this week end, are: Arnold S. Denker vs. Herbert Seidman, Robin Ault vs. Raymond Weinstein, James T. Sherwin vs Robert Byrne and Edmar Mednis vs. Paul Benko.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, December 20, 1959 - Page 149

Fischer Achieves Fortunate Draw
Hard-Pressed by Byrne in U.S. Chess, Defender Splits Point on Technicality

Bobby Fischer, the 16-year-old defender, was brilliantly outplayed by Robert Byrne of Indianapolis, but nevertheless drew in forty moves in the United States chess tournament yesterday at the West Side Y.M.C.A.
In a position in which the Brooklyn prodigy had two bishops in return for the queen he had lost, Fischer claimed a draw because of a three-time repetition made by Byrne under pressure of time. Upon examination of the score sheets by Hans Kmoch, the referee, his claim was found to be valid.
On the merits of the play, which was highlighted by an overwhelming attack upon the black king, Byrne was conceded to be deserving of the point.
Happy because of the form he developed, Byrne, a former intercollegiate champion, took his disappointment like a good sportsman, “He slipped off the hook,” he smilingly remarked.
Byrne Launches Attack
Fischer, on the black side of a Queen's Gambit, was in full control of the QB file, Byrne ignored thmis and started upon a whirlwind assault against the black king's retreat.
Pal Benko, Hungarian refugee, won the black side of a Sicilian defense from Herbert Seidman in thirty-nine moves. The stateless player, with a score of 1½—½, leads the standing. Arthur B. Bisguier, former United States champion, defeated Sidney Bernstein, who lost a pawn in a Gruenfeld defense and resigned after forty-one moves.
The shortest game of the round was won by Arnold S. Denker, the 1944 national champion, from Robin Ault of Cranford, N.J., national junior champion, in a Slav defense lasting twenty-two moves. James T. Sherwin, on the black side of a Queen's Gambit accepted, won in twenty-five moves from Raymond Weinstein of Brooklyn.
Bisguier and Sherwin are tied at 1—0 with Samuel Reshevsky, whose second-round game with Edmar Mednis was postponed.
Bisguier Game Adjourned
Fischer, who re-entered the tournament after yielding to the United States Chess Federation and the American Chess Foundation in a dispute on the drawing of the pairings, adjourned with Bisguier after forty-one moves in the first round on Friday night. The game will be resumed Monday night.
Weinstein defeated Ault in forty moves. Mednis and Benko drew in forty moves, and Byrne and Sherwin adjourned after forty-four moves.
The scores of Fischer's drawn and adjourned games follow:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, December 21, 1959 - Page 37

Reshevsky Draws With Benko In 16 Moves in U.S. Chess Play
Samuel Reshevsky and Pal Benko, both international grandmasters, drew a tame game in sixteen moves in the third round of the United States chess championship tournament at the West Side Y.M.C.A. last night.
Benko, with a score of 2—1, is tied for the lead with Herbert Seidman, who won from Robin Ault.
Reshevsky, with 1½—½, has an adjourned game with Edmar Mednis to be played off at the Manhattan Chess Club tonight. Reshevsky is a piece ahead and his expected victory will give him the lead in the field of twelve.
Bobby Fischer, the defender, Arthur B. Bisguier and James T. Sherwin adjourned their games. Fischer halted play after forty-two moves with Raymond Weinstein in an even ending. Bisguier is a pawn ahead with Mednis.
Evidently weary after his strenuous draw with Fischer in their second-round game on Saturday, Robert Byrne was content to draw a King's Indian defense with Sidney Bernstein of Brooklyn in twelve moves.
Seidman, resorting to the Sicilian defense, won in twenty-one moves from Ault. Next came the sixteen-move encounter between Benko and Reshevsky, the latter resorting to the King's Indian defense.
The fourth round is scheduled for 6:30 P.M. tomorrow at the Manhattan Chess Club.
Following are the scores of two of the best games of the tournament, won in the second round by Bisguier and Benko.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, December 22, 1959 - Page 44

Fischer A Victor Ties For Second
U.S. Chess Champion Beats Bisguier in 60 Moves—Sherwin Plays Draw

The United States chess champion, Bobby Fischer, defending his title in the annual tournament for the Lessing J. Rosenwald trophy, scored his first victory of the competition last night.
The 16-year-old Brooklynite outmaneuvered Arthur B. Bisguier, a former titleholder, in sixty moves of a king and pawn ending at the Manhattan Chess Club.
Fischer tied Pal Benko, a Hungarian refugee; Herbert Seidman, a Brooklyn College graduate, and James T. Sherwin of New York for second place. Each has a 2-1 score.
Sherwin drew his first-round game with Robert Byrne in fifty-one moves.
The fourth round is scheduled for 6:30 tonight at the Manhattan Chess Club.
The scores of three tournament games:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, December 24, 1959 - Page 25

Fischer Assumes Title Chess Lead
U.S. Champion Scores Over Ault—Reshevsky Beats Bisguier in 33 Moves

Bobby Fischer, the 16-year-old United States chess champion, set the pace last night in the fifth round of the national championship tournament for the Lessing J. Rosenwald trophy at the Manhattan Chess Club.
He defeated Robin Ault, the national junior champion, in thirty-two moves. With a score of 4—1, the Erasmus Hall high school student went into the lead. Samuel Reshevsky, who also succeeded in winning his game, took second place with a tally of 3½-1½. Pal Benko, a Hungarian refugee, overstepped the time limit with Robert Byrne of Indianapolis and fell back into the second section of the standing. Three games were adjourned.
Players to Get Rest
The players will rest over the holidays until Saturday afternoon, when the sixth round will be contested at the Manhattan Chess Club.
Fischer had the white pieces against Ault, who set up a Pirc defense. Brooklyn's wonder boy castled on the queen's side of the board and inaugurated a telling attack against the black king, castled rather late. Vigorous tactics on the past of Fischer opened up lines on the king's side and eventually, on the thirtieth move, he captured the king knight pawn. Two moves later Ault, threatened with checkmate, surrendered.
Reshevsky and Arthur B. Bisguier, who resorted to a Nimzo-Indian defense, both castled on the king's side. Bisguier retreated his bishop to K2. The American grandmaster advanced energetically and with his sixteenth move enlarged the scope of his pieces. Advancing his king's rook's pawn to the sixth rank, he disorganized the black position to such an extent that Bisguier found himself in a hopeless position and resigned after thirty-three moves.
Three Games Adjourned
Byrne, playing the Gruenfeld defense against Benko, was in his best form. He pressed his opponent to such an extent, with two bishops opposed to two knights, that he won a piece. Under time pressure, Benko lost his queen, and, at the thirty-ninth turn, overstepped the time limit.
The following games were adjourned: James T. Sherwin vs. Herbert Seidman, Sicilian defense, forty moves. Sidney Bernstein, vs. Arnold S. Denker, Polish opening, forty-three moves, and Edmar Mednis vs. Raymond Weinstein, Sicilian defense, forty moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, December 25, 1959 - Page 28

Pawn Line Break Wins For Fischer
Champion's Maneuver Key To Victory Over Ault in U.S. Title Chess

The activities of the twelve players engaged in the United States chess championship tournament for the Lessing J. Rosenwald trophy came to a halt at the Manhattan Chess Club early yesterday morning and the long holiday rest was welcomed by all.
Play will be resumed at that club tomorrow afternoon, after which two rounds will be contested at the Marshall Chess Club.
After five rounds, with five adjourned games still pending, Bobby Fischer, the defending champion, and Samuel Reshevsky are first and second, respectively.
Herbert Seidman, whose defeat of Reshevsky was the only loss sustained by either of the leaders, is tied for third place with James T. Sherwin, who gained an additional point, yesterday, at the expense of Robin Ault.
Ault resigned his adjourned fourth-round game without further play. Unless other agreements are reached, the five unfinished games will be held over until next week.
Fischer's sixth-round victory over Ault resulted from his castling on the queen's side of the board and then breaking up the pawn line in front of the black king. Ault's queen was forced into the king's rook's square, leaving the way open for a forced checkmate.
Reshevsky likewise adopted vigorous tactics against Arthur B. Bisguier with an advance of his king's rook's pawn, which reached the sixth rank at the twenty-second move. There its strength was revealed in the fine combination worked out by Reshevsky, leading to a forced victory in thirty-three moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, December 26, 1959 - Page 11

Fischer To Meet Sherwin In Chess
Unbeaten Rivals Play Today in U.S. Tourney—Benko Will Face Weinstein

After a day of rest, the twelve competitors in the United States chess championship will resume play at the Manhattan Chess Club today. Five of the six games in the sixth round will start at 2 P.M. Samuel Reshevsky's sixth-round match with Robert Byrne is scheduled to begin at 7 P.M.
The highlight of the afternoon session will be the encounter between Bobby Fischer, the 16-year-old defender, and James T. Sherwin, currently the national speed champion. Fischer leads the field with a 4-1 score. Like Bobby, Sherwin is undefeated, with a tally of 3—1 (two victories and two draws). In addition, Sherwin has an adjourned game from the fifth round with Herbert Seidman. Seidman is a pawn behind, but is considered to have drawing chances.
Sherwin, a lawyer, held the intercollegiate and New York State championships in 1951 and was the first player to represent the United States in the world junior championship at Copenhagen. He also played in the tournament at Portoroz, where Fischer and Pal Benko qualified for the world challengers' tournament. Fischer will play the black pieces against him today.
In other sixth-round games, Seidman is paired with Arthur B. Bisguier, Raymond Weinstein with Benko, Arnold S. Denker with Edmar Mednis, and Robin Ault with Sidney Bernstein.
Ending Left Obscure
Because of the hurried play under time pressure the last phase of the fifth-round game between Benko and Byrne was left somewhat obscure, except that Benko, after losing a piece, had overstepped the time limit. This was the Hungarian refugee's first defeat.
Byrne, 31, a Yale graduate, is a faculty member at the University of Indianapolis. During the Nineteen Forties he won the New England and intercollegiate championships.
Against Benko, Byrne was in his old-time form, which carried him to international fame at the Olympics at Helsinki seven years ago.
Benko essayed the English opening, which the Yale man turned into a king's Indian defense. A combination initiated by his opponent cleverly was refuted with Byrne's fifteenth move. Castling on the queen's side of the board turned out to be an error of judgment on the part of Benko.
Byrne operated successfully against the white king, although the practical maneuvering indicated equality. For a time the white forces commanded the open queen's file, but with his thirty-sixth move Byrne tightened his grip on the position. With his clock running out Benko lost a knight and came to grief. The score:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, December 27, 1959 - Page 142

Fischer, Sherwin Draw in 35 Moves
Defending Champion Keeps Lead in National Chess —Benko is Victor

Bobby Fischer, the United States chess champion, still was undefeated after six rounds in the national title tournament for the Lessing J. Rosenwald trophy at the Manhattan Chess Club.
However, while retaining the lead with a score of 4½-1½, he was held to a draw yesterday by the stout play of James T. Sherwin, a New York attorney. The game lasted thirty-five moves.
Sherwin also remained undefeated and the extra half-point enabled him to tie for second, at 3½-1½, with Samuel Reshevsky, whose game with Robert Byrne was postponed.
Fischer, playing black, resorted to the Sicilian defense when Sherwin opened with P-K4. Castling on the queen's side, Sherwin adopted the customary advance of pawns against the black king. This maneuver was adequately met by the champion, who also castled on the queen's side at his seventeenth turn.
Queens Are Exchanged
Queens were exchanged on the nineteenth move, after which the game drifted into a rook-and-pawn ending, with three pawns each. A draw then was inevitable.
The second game to be finished was won by Pal Benko, a Hungarian refugee, from Raymond Weinstein of Brooklyn, last year's national junior champion. The victory enabled Benko to displace his opponent in the first division of the standing.
The victor, with the black pieces, set up a King's Indian defense. He attacked vigorously by advancing the queen's rook's pawn to the sixth rank, permitting it to be captured. In return Benko hemmed in Weinstein's queen's bishop. With 20 . . . QxQP, Benko took complete command and sacrificed the exchange three moves later.
A combination with queen and knight against the white king brought about the Brooklyn player's resignation after twenty-four moves.
The most exciting game of the round was between Herbert Seidman and Arthur B. Bisguier, former United States champion.
Seidman Gives Up Knight
Bisguier used the Sicilian defense. Seidman, seizing the attack, sacrificed a knight on the ninth move. He gave up another piece at the thirteenth and the net result of a thrilling combination was that Seidman emerged with a queen and bishop opposed to two rooks and a bishop. Each had six pawns and the prospects for an eventual draw were excellent.
Edmar Mednis, a former New York University star, gave a good account of himself and defeated Arnold S. Denker, the 1944 national champion, in 29 moves. Both castled on the king's side of the board and after the KR file had been opened, Mednis sacrificed a knight to bring the white king out into the open.
With three passed pawns advancing together, Mednis recovered the piece at his twenty-eight turn, leaving his opponent's king without protection.
Sidney Bernstein of Brooklyn was a piece ahead in a Caro-Kann defense with Robin Ault of Cranford when they adjourned after forty-one moves.

The seventh round is scheduled for two o'clock this afternoon at the Marshall Chess Club, 23 West 10th Street.
The score of the Fischer-Sherwin game follows:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, December 27, 1959 - Page 31

Fischer In Tourney; Reshevsky Leads
The big news at the start of the tournament for the United States Chess Championship was that Bobby Fischer, 16-year-old defending titleholder, would participate after all.
The youngster had withdrawn because of his objection to the method of drawing for pairings and on the eve of the tournament opening Anthony F. Saidy of New York had been announced as a substitute.
At the last moment Jerry Spann, president of the U.S. Chess Federation, who had flown in from Oklahoma City, brought Fischer into line with the promise that the committee in future tournaments would draw numbers in the presence of the players or their representatives.
Fischer was pitter against former U.S. champion Arthur B. Bisguier of New York in the first round. The latter adopted the Petroff Defense, which led to simplification through several exchanges. The game was adjourned in a rook endgame in which Fischer had a strong passed pawn. This was sufficient to win in the second session after a total of 60 moves.
Fischer drew in the next two rounds against Robert Byrne and Raymond Weinstein. His score of 2-1 was equaled by Paul Benko, Herbert Seidman and James T. Sherwin.
The leader after three completed rounds was Samuel Reshevsky, outstanding star of the Western Hemisphere until Fischer outscored him in the last two national championships. Reshevsky won his first two starts against Sidney Bernstein and Edmar Mednis and drew with Benko.
Following are the detailed results and the standings of the players.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959
Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Sunday Gazette-Mail Charleston, West Virginia Sunday, December 27, 1959 - Page 49

AFTER THREE rounds of play in the national chess championship tournament in New York City Samuel Reshevsky, five-time U.S. title holder, was in the lead with 2½-½. Paul Benko and Herbert Seidman followed with 2 to 1.
Apparently the defending champion, 16-year-old Bobby Fischer, almost did not compete due to an objection on his part to the manner of making the pairings. Bobby wanted it done as they did in Europe.
The matter was finally smoothed out though, and the Brooklyn schoolboy set out after his third straight championship. But it may be harder this year since his opponents will be more inclined to play the boy quite cautiously this time.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, December 28, 1959 - Page 29

Fischer Sets Back Seidman in Chess; Reshevsky Scores
Bobby Fischer and Samuel Reshevsky, the favorites in the United States championship, won seventh-round games last night at the Marshall Chess Club.
Fischer, the defending champion, defeated Herbert Seidman in seventeen moves and retained the leadership with a score of 5½—1½.
Reshevsky's game went to the end of the five-hour session. After forty-one moves, Raymond Weinstein of Brooklyn resigned to him.
Vigorous tactics by Edmar Mednis against a Sicilian defense earned a victory in forty moves over Robin Ault. Arthur B. Bisguier drew a French defense adopted by Robert Byrne in twenty-six moves.
James T. Sherwin made good headway against the irregular opening adopted by Sidney Bernstein and played for forty moves until adjournment. Pal Benko was the exchange ahead with Arnold S. Denker, who had played the queen's Indian defense.
In adjourned sixth-round games, Seidman and Bisguier drew in fifty-six moves and Reshevsky and Byrne drew in twenty-two moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

The Courier-Journal Louisville, Kentucky Monday, December 28, 1959 - Page 12

Chess Is Used As 'Parallel Bars'
“Goodman believes chess is a game for young and vigorous people. He points out that the present United States champion, Bobby Fischer, is only 16 and that chess immortal Paul Morphy was in his prime at 20.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, December 29, 1959 - Page 30

Fischer Extends His Lead In Chess
Champion Beats Bernstein in 38 Moves—Sherwin, Byrne Play Draws

Bobby Fischer, defending his title, scored his fifth victory of the United States championship tournament at the Marshall Chess Club last night.
Bobby defeated a fellow Brooklynite, Sidney Bernstein, who has held the championships of both the Marshall and Manhattan Chess Clubs. The match lasted thirty-eight moves.
Fischer's eight-round victory left the 16-year-old Erasmus Hall High School student with five games won, three draws and none lost. He has a score of 6½-1½ in the competition for the Lessing J. Rosenwald Trophy.
Fischer's closest rival, Samuel Reshevsky, did not play. He had been scheduled to meet Arnold S. Denker, the 1944 champion, but Denker received a leave of absence to celebrate his wedding anniversary.
The match, in which Reshevsky will play the black pieces, was postponed until Friday morning. Reshevsky's score of 5-2 comprises four games won, two drawn and one lost—to Herbert Seidman.
Only Robert Byrne, who has drawn six times, and James T. Sherwin are, like Fischer, still undefeated.
Seidman and Byrne drew a French defense in eleven moves when Seidman forced an exchange of queens. Another draw was recorded between Sherwin and Edmar Mednis, both of New York. Mednis adopted his favorite Dutch defense. They agreed to split the point in twenty-one moves.
Raymond Weinstein held Arthur B. Bisguier, a former title-holder, to a draw in a Slav defense lasting thirty-one moves.
The last game to be finished was won by Paul Benko after an exciting contest with Robin Ault, the national junior champion. Benko outmaneuvered his youthful opponent on the black side of a Sicilian defense and scored in thirty-six moves.
The ninth round is scheduled for the Manhattan Chess Club at 6:30 tonight.
The scores of the games:

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, December 30, 1959 - Page 26

Fischer Defeats Mednis In Chess
Triumphs in 40 Moves and Keeps Lead at 7½-1½ in U.S. Tourney Here

Bobby Fischer, the defending champion, and Samuel Reshevsky, an international grandmaster, triumphed in the ninth round of the United States chess championship at the Manhattan Chess Club last night.
Fischer, after an eventful forty moves with Edmar Mednis, a former New York University star, remained in the lead with a score of 7½—1½. Reshevsky, pitted against Robin Ault of Cranford, N.J., scored in twenty-one moves to remain second with 6—2.
Fischer resorted to the Sicilian defense and Mednis castled on the Queen's side of the board. This turned out to be disastrous for him in the long run.
Mednis Uses Pressure
Nevertheless, Mednis exerted pressure on the king's side, as the champion had posted his king at K2. With all of his major pieces massed on the queen's knight's file, Fischer found an ingenious way of breaking through and winning the white queen.
Reshevsky elected to play a close opening, to which Ault reacted with the Gruenfield defense. Both castled on the king's side of the board and Ault retreated with king to rook square. A pretty sacrifice of a knight at his twentieth move destroyed Ault's position so that he resigned a move later.
Robert Byrne of the University of Indianapolis defeated Raymond Weinstein of Brooklyn in a Nimzo-Indian defense, adopted by the latter, in forty-nine moves. Byrne offered up a knight on the twenty-third move, which Weinstein dared not capture because of a threatened checkmate.
Byrne Gains Exchange
However, Byrne gained the exchange and went on to win. The point gained by Byrne placed him third in the standing with 5—3.
With his own king beleaguered, Sidney Bernstein, after opening irregularly, sprang a forced checkmate against Herbert Seidman, conqueror of Reshevsky, by sacrificing his queen after twenty-six moves.
Arthur B. Bisguier won from Arnold S. Denker in a Nimzo-Indian defense in forty-two moves after capturing one of his opponent's knights.
Pal Benko essayed the English opening against James T. Sherwin, who turned it into a King's Indian defense. They adjourned after forty moves.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, December 31, 1959 - Page 18

Byrne Sets Back Denker In Chess
Indianapolis Student Beats 1944 Victor in 37 Moves at U.S. Title Tourney

While Bobby Fischer, the United States chess champion, and Samuel Reshevsky, his chief rival, were kept busy last night by their opponents, Robert Byrne of the University of Indianapolis crept up on them with a fine victory over Arnold S. Denker.
Denker, the 1944 champion, lost in the tenth round of the national championship tournament for the Lessing J. Rosenwald trophy at the Manhattan Chess Club.
Byrne strengthened his hold on third place and, with a score of 6—3, became a threat to the two leaders.
Reshevsky Beats Sherwin
Reshevsky, on the black side of a Sicilian defense, defeated James T. Sherwin in forty-one moves at the close of the night session. Reshevsky then had a score of 7—2. Fischer had 7½—1½.
Fischer also consumed five hours in a tough struggle with Paul Benko. They adjourned after forty-one moves in an approximately even rook and pawn ending.
Arthur B. Bisguier, a former title-holder, won in thirty moves from Robin Ault of Cranford, N.J. and held fourth place in the standing with 5-4.
Byrne played the King's Indian defense against Denker, both castling on the king's side of the board. The former Yale player drove back his opponent's queen bishop and then exchanged a knight for it. While Denker lost time capturing a distant pawn, Byrne got control of the open king's file and, with knight and bishop supporting, won smartly in thirty-seven moves.
Najdorf Variation Used
Reshevsky followed the Najdorf variation in the Sicilian defense and castled on the queen's side. Sherwin followed suit. Queens were exchanged on the sixteenth move. Superior maneuvering netted Reshevsky two pawns. In the ending each had two bishops but Reshevsky still had the advantage in pawns, by 6—4, and Sherwin decided to resign.
Two other games were adjourned: Herbert Seidman and Raymond Weinstein and Sidney Bernstein and Edmar Mednis.
There will be no play today and adjourned games are scheduled for 3 P.M. tomorrow at the Manhattan Chess Club.

Bobby Fischer - Chess: 1959

Newspapers NY Times

1959 “Bobby Fischer Chess” Articles

January 1959

  1. (Duplicate) () () () The Atchison Daily Globe, Atchison, Kansas, Thursday, January 01, 1959 - Page 14, “Raising A Genius? It's Not Easy”
  2. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () () (Image) The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Thursday, January 01, 1959 - Page 5, “Fischer's Great Win”
  3. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Times, San Mateo, California, Thursday, January 01, 1959 - Page 107, “Chess Champ”
  4. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Minneapolis Star, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Friday, January 02, 1959 - Page 24, “People in Sports News”
  5. (Duplicate) () () The Daily Times-News, Burlington, North Carolina, Friday, January 02, 1959 - Page 11, “Are You Raising A Genius? It's Not Easy”
  6. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Battle Creek Enquirer, Battle Creek, Michigan, Friday, January 02, 1959 - Page 12, “Former Olivet Man Seeks Chess Crown”
  7. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Ironwood Daily Globe, Ironwood, Michigan, Friday, January 02, 1959 - Page 12, “Reshevsky in Second Place in Chess Match”
  8. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, January 03, 1959 - Page 14, “Fischer, Bisguier Adjourn In Chess”
  9. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Vidette-Messenger of Porter County, Valparaiso, Indiana, Saturday, January 03, 1959 - Page 5, “Byrne Moves Up In Chess”
  10. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, January 04, 1959 - Page 230, “Fischer Sets Back Bisguier In Chess”
  11. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, January 04, 1959 - Pages 224, 225, 226, 228, 229, 230, “Sports Review of 1958: Chess”
  12. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, January 04, 1959 - Page 36, “Bobby Fischer Nearing Second U.S. Chess Title”
  13. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, January 04, 1959 - Page 36, “Chess by Isaac Kashdan”
  14. (Duplicate) () The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, January 04, 1959 - Page 38, “Bobby Fischer Nearing Second U.S. Chess Title”
  15. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, January 04, 1959 - Page 48, “Chess Championship”
  16. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Press and Sun-Bulletin, Binghamton, New York, Sunday, January 04, 1959 - Page 36, “Chess Win Near”
  17. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Poughkeepsie Journal, Poughkeepsie, New York, Sunday, January 04, 1959 - Page 4, “Boy, 15, Nears Chess Laurels”
  18. (Duplicate) () Press and Sun-Bulletin, Binghamton, New York, Sunday, January 04, 1959 - Page 11, “Chess Win Near”
  19. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, January 04, 1959 - Page 18, “Nears 2D Title”
  20. (Duplicate) () The Journal Times, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, January 04, 1959 - Page 18, “Nears 2D Title”
  21. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 38, “Fischer Retains U.S. Chess Title; 15-Year-Old Student Draws Final Test With R. Byrne: Brooklyn Star Only Undefeated Player in Tourney”
  22. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 60, “Bobby Fischer Retains U.S. Chess Crown”
  23. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Herald and News, Klamath Falls, Oregon, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 9, “Briefs By The Associated Press”
  24. (Duplicate) () The Record-Argus, Greenville, Pennsylvania, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 10, “Sports in Brief”
  25. (Duplicate) () The Progress, Clearfield, Pennsylvania, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 8, “Sports in Brief”
  26. (Duplicate) () Reno Gazette-Journal, Reno, Nevada, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 15, “Sports in Brief”
  27. (Duplicate) () The Evening Standard, Uniontown, Pennsylvania, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 10, “15-Year-Old Champ”
  28. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Nanaimo Daily News, Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 2, “Fischer Wins U.S. Chess Title”
  29. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () () (Image) Press and Sun-Bulletin, Binghamton, New York, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 16, “Teenager Repeats World Chess Title: Old Men Stubborn . . . but Kid's Got It”
  30. (Duplicate) () The Baltimore Sun, Baltimore, Maryland, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 14, “Fischer Retains Chess Crown”
  31. (Duplicate) () Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 15, “Fischer Collects 2nd Chess Crown”
  32. (Duplicate) () Elmira Advertiser, Elmira, New York, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 10, “Teen-Ager Wins National Chess Title”
  33. (Duplicate) () () The News Journal, Wilmington, Delaware, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 17, “Time Runs Out On Grand Master: Two Draws Give Chess Title to Bobby Fischer, 15”
  34. (Duplicate) () The Morning News, Wilmington, Delaware, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 1, “Fischer Wins Second National Chess Title”
  35. (Duplicate) () Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 22, “Chess King, 15, Retains Title”
  36. (Duplicate) () Fort Lauderdale News, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 20, “Old Master Gets Trapped; Kid Star Rules Chess World”
  37. (Duplicate) () Austin American-Statesman, Austin, Texas, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 15, “Chess Title No Bother To Prodigy”
  38. (Duplicate) () Star-Gazette, Elmira, New York, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 12, “How Young Fischer Won Chess Crown”
  39. (Duplicate) () Argus-Leader, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 9, “One Minute Sports Page”
  40. (Duplicate) () The Kansas City Times, Kansas City, Missouri, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 22, “Repeat In Chess”
  41. (Duplicate) () Tucson Daily Citizen, Tucson, Arizona, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 20, “Chess”
  42. (Duplicate) () Daily Press, Newport News, Virginia, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 7, “Whiz Kid Fischer Wins Chess Title”
  43. (Duplicate) () Tallahassee Democrat, Tallahassee, Florida, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 12, “Boy, 15, Repeats Chess Victory”
  44. (Duplicate) () The Lawton Constitution, Lawton, Oklahoma, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 7, “Teenage Whiz Keeps His Title in Chess Event”
  45. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Minneapolis Star, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 25, “Fischer Wins”
  46. (Duplicate) () The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 18, “Elsewhere”
  47. (Duplicate) () Oakland Tribune, Oakland, California, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 30, “Retains Title”
  48. (Duplicate) () () Orlando Evening Star, Orlando, Florida, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 4, “The Arena Was Still, Expectant: Could The Brash Youngster Beat The Old Pro In the Championship?”
  49. (Duplicate) () () Orlando Evening Star, Orlando, Florida, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 2, “The Arena Was Still, Expectant: Could The Brash Youngster Beat The Old Pro In the Championship?”
  50. (Duplicate) () () Orlando Evening Star, Orlando, Florida, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 3, “The Arena Was Still, Expectant: Could The Brash Youngster Beat The Old Pro In the Championship?”
  51. (Duplicate) () The Des Moines Register, Des Moines, Iowa, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 2, “People In the News: Briefly…”
  52. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Indianapolis News, Indianapolis, Indiana, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 15, “Chess”
  53. (Duplicate) () The Gettysburg Times, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 5, “Chess”
  54. (Duplicate) () The Ottawa Journal, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, Monday, January 05, 1959 - Page 3, “Boy, 15, Retains U.S. Chess Title”
  55. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, January 06, 1959 - Page 38, “Sherwin Defeats Evans In 42 Moves: Takes Third Place in U.S. Chess Tourney—Bisguier and Lombardy in Draw”
  56. () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, January 08, 1959 - Page 7, “Bobby Fischer, 15, Wins U.S. Tourney Twice”
  57. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, January 08, 1959 - Page 38, “Fischer To Get Medal: Erasmus Hall High to Honor U.S. Chess Champion”
  58. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, January 09, 1959 - Page 26, “A Medal for Bobby Fischer”
  59. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Morning Herald, Hagerstown, Maryland, Friday, January 09, 1959 - Page 31, “Master At Chess”
  60. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Fort Lauderdale News, Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Sunday, January 11, 1959 - Page 25, “U.S. Championship”
  61. (Duplicate) () The Marshall News Messenger, Marshall, Texas, Sunday, January 11, 1959 - Page 18, “Raising A Genius Not Easy”
  62. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Journal Times, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, January 11, 1959 - Page 39, “Fischer Cops Rosenwald”
  63. (Duplicate) () The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, January 11, 1959 - Page 39, “Fischer Cops Rosenwald”
  64. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky, Sunday, January 11, 1959 - Page 32, “Fischer Retains American Title; German Master Wins at Hastings”
  65. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Nanaimo Daily News, Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada, Thursday, January 15, 1959 - Page 3, “Fifteen-Year-Old Chess Champ In World Finals”
  66. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Austin Daily Herald, Austin, Minnesota, Thursday, January 15, 1959 - Page 4, “Gold Medal at Erasmus Hall High School: Austin Daily Herald's POT POURRI”
  67. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Montana Standard, Butte, Montana, Friday, January 16, 1959 - Page 19, “Master At Chess”
  68. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) (Image) (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, January 18, 1959 - Page 45, “Championship Games”
  69. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, January 18, 1959 - Page 247, “Fischer, Uhlmann Top Chess Roosts; 15-Year-Old Boy Dominates U.S. Picture”
  70. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Express and News, San Antonio, Texas, Sunday, January 18, 1959 - Page 75, “Bobby Fischer Going Strong in U.S. National Championship”
  71. (Duplicate) () Des Moines Tribune, Des Moines, Iowa, Thursday, January 22, 1959 - Page 26, “He's Chess Champ—and Shy Boy”
  72. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () () () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, January 22, 1959 - Page 36, “We are indebted to the Illustrated London News”
  73. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) (Duplicate) () Detroit Free Press, Detroit, Michigan, Sunday, January 25, 1959 - Page 22, “Chess Champ: Whiz, 15, Declines An Honor”
  74. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, January 25, 1959 - Page 219, “Reshevsky Urges Match-Play Test: Contends Tournament Does Not Establish True Skill of Any Two Masters”
  75. (Duplicate) () The Corpus Christi Caller-Times, Corpus Christi, Texas, Sunday, January 25, 1959 - Page 39, “School Work Delays Chess Champ's Prize”
  76. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Express and News, San Antonio, Texas, Sunday, January 25, 1959 - Page 81, “Bobby Fischer and Sicilian Defense”
  77. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) (Image) St. Louis Post-Dispatch, St. Louis, Missouri, Tuesday, January 27, 1959 - Page 33, “He's Chess Champ, But Still Just a Boy”
  78. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Oakland Tribune, Oakland, California, Wednesday, January 28, 1959 - Page 25, “Chess History Is Topic for Museum Film”
  79. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Thursday, January 29, 1959 - Page 10, “The U.S. Championship”
  80. (Unrelated) Santa Cruz Sentinel, Santa Cruz, California, Sunday, January 04, 1959 - Page 22

February 1959

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, February 08, 1959 - Page 34, “Rosenwald Feature Game”
  2. (Duplicate) () The Journal Times, Racine, Wisconsin, Sunday, February 08, 1959 - Page 34, “Rosenwald Feature Game”
  3. (Duplicate) () (Image) The Times, Munster, Indiana, Monday, February 09, 1959 - Page 13, “Chess Master”
  4. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, February 12, 1959 - Page 6, “National Ratings List Two Grand Masters”
  5. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Journal Times, Racine, Wisconsin, Friday, February 13, 1959 - Page 19, “A Game Opponent”
  6. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Express and News, San Antonio, Texas, Sunday, February 22, 1959 - Page 73, “Bobby Fischer and Title”
  7. (Duplicate) () () Messenger-Inquirer, Owensboro, Kentucky, Thursday, February 26, 1959 - Page 28, “Raising A Genius? It's Not Easy”
  8. (Duplicate) () The Record-Argus, Greenville, Pennsylvania, Friday, February 27, 1959 - Page 6, “Raising A Genius? Not Easy”
  9. (Unrelated) The Times and Democrat, Orangeburg, South Carolina, Sunday, February 08, 1959 - Page 5
  10. (Unrelated) News-Press, Fort Myers, Florida, Tuesday, February 17, 1959 - Page 5
  11. (Unrelated) The Indiana Gazette, Indiana, Pennsylvania, Thursday, February 19, 1959 - Page 18

March 1959

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () () () (Image) (Image) (Image) The Journal News, White Plains, New York, Wednesday, March 04, 1959 - Page 10, “Ex-Chess Champion A Spring Valley Resident”
  2. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa, California, Sunday, March 15, 1959 - Page 28, “Bobby Fischer, Keeping Up With All the Latest Traps ”
  3. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Tennessean, Nashville, Tennessee, Saturday, March 14, 1959 - Page 11, “U.S. Whiz Enters”
  4. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Monday, March 16, 1959 - Page 12, “Yugoslavs Like U.S. Chess Whiz”
  5. (Duplicate) () Reno Gazette-Journal, Reno, Nevada, Tuesday, March 17, 1959 - Page 14, “Chess Prodigy Hit in Europe”
  6. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, March 22, 1959 - Page 94, “Chess For Children”
  7. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, March 25, 1959 - Page 31, “Fischer Adjourns Opener”
  8. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Montgomery Advertiser, Montgomery, Alabama, Wednesday, March 25, 1959 - Page 12, “U.S. Chess Champ Gains Draw In Match”
  9. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Logansport Press, Logansport, Indiana, Thursday, March 26, 1959 - Page 14, “U.S. Chess Wizard, Age 15, In Two Draws”
  10. (Duplicate) () Standard-Sentinel, Hazleton, Pennsylvania, Thursday, March 26, 1959 - Page 18, “2nd Straight Draw For American Chess Master”
  11. (Duplicate) () The Morning Herald, Hagerstown, Maryland, Thursday, March 26, 1959 - Page 30, “Chess Master Held To Draw”
  12. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Cincinnati Enquirer, Cincinnati, Ohio, Thursday, March 26, 1959 - Page 40, “Fischer Draws in Chess Play”
  13. (Duplicate) () The Cincinnati Enquirer, Cincinnati, Ohio, Thursday, March 26, 1959 - Page 46, “Fischer Draws in Chess Play”
  14. (Duplicate) () Casper Morning Star, Casper, Wyoming, Thursday, March 26, 1959 - Page 24, “Junior U.S. Chess Player In 2nd Draw”
  15. (Duplicate) () The Daily Telegram, Eau Claire, Wisconsin, Thursday, March 26, 1959 - Page 8, “American Chess Master in Draw”
  16. (Duplicate) () The Daily Capital News, Jefferson City, Missouri, Thursday, March 26, 1959 - Page 14, “American Chess Champ In Second Tie Game”
  17. (Duplicate) () The Missoulian, Missoula, Montana, Thursday, March 26, 1959 - Page 2, “Young Chess Master Has Another Draw”
  18. (Duplicate) () The Springfield News-Leader, Springfield, Missouri, Thursday, March 26, 1959 - Page 3, “U.S. Chess Champ In Second Draw”
  19. (Duplicate) () Nanaimo Daily News, Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada, Thursday, March 26, 1959 - Page 15, “Young Chess Star In Second Draw”
  20. (Duplicate) () The Pantagraph, Bloomington, Illinois, Thursday, March 26, 1959 - Page 24, “Youthful U.S. Chess Player Gains 2nd Draw”
  21. (Duplicate) () Argus-Leader, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, Thursday, March 26, 1959 - Page 7, “U.S. Champ Trailing in Argentine Chess Meet”
  22. (Duplicate) () The Tampa Tribune, Tampa, Florida, Thursday, March 26, 1959 - Page 32, “American Chess Star Gets Draw”
  23. (Duplicate) () The Salt Lake Tribune, Salt Lake City, Utah, Thursday, March 26, 1959 - Page 47, “Yank Chess Ace Draws in Meet”
  24. (Duplicate) () The Tennessean, Nashville, Tennessee, Thursday, March 26, 1959 - Page 29, “U.S. Chess Champ Draws In International Tourney”
  25. (Duplicate) () The Salt Lake Tribune, Salt Lake City, Utah, Thursday, March 26, 1959 - Page 13, “Yank Chess Ace Draws In Meet”
  26. (Duplicate) () The Burlington Free Press, Burlington, Vermont, Thursday, March 26, 1959 - Page 25, “Fischer Draws In Argentina”
  27. (Duplicate) () The Cumberland News, Cumberland, Maryland, Thursday, March 26, 1959 - Page 18, “Young Chess Player Has Second Draw”
  28. (Duplicate) () The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Thursday, March 26, 1959 - Page 5, “Youthful Chess Player in Draws”
  29. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, March 27, 1959 - Page 31, “Fischer Bows In Chess”
  30. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Montgomery Advertiser, Montgomery, Alabama, Friday, March 27, 1959 - Page 18, “U.S. Chess Champion Has Yet To Win Match”
  31. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Bridgeport Post, Bridgeport, Connecticut, Friday, March 27, 1959 - Page 14, “U.S. Chess Whiz Loses”
  32. (Duplicate) () The Salt Lake Tribune, Salt Lake City, Utah, Friday, March 27, 1959 - Page 85, “Failure to win third match”
  33. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, March 28, 1959 - Page 21, “Fischer Chess Victor: Brooklyn Youth Beats Mendez in 38 Moves in Argentina”
  34. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, March 31, 1959 - Page 37, “Fischer Chess Victor: Defeats Redolfi in 40 Moves in Argentine Tourney”
  35. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Montgomery Advertiser, Montgomery, Alabama, Tuesday, March 31, 1959 - Page 11, “U.S. Chess Champion Defeats Argentinian”
  36. (Duplicate) () The Baltimore Sun, Baltimore, Maryland, Tuesday, March 31, 1959 - Page 17, “Fischer Chess Winner”
  37. (Duplicate) () Clarion-Ledger, Jackson, Mississippi, Tuesday, March 31, 1959 - Page 15, “Fischer Beats Redolfi In Chess Tournament”
  38. (Duplicate) () The Journal Times, Racine, Wisconsin, Tuesday, March 31, 1959 - Page 17, “Fischer Wins One”
  39. (Duplicate) () Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Tuesday, March 31, 1959 - Page 39, “In 40 Moves”
  40. (Unrelated) The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky, Thursday, March 12, 1959 - Page 40
  41. (Unrelated) Clarion-Ledger, Jackson, Mississippi, Tuesday, March 17, 1959 - Page 15
  42. (Unrelated) The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky, Wednesday, March 18, 1959 - Page 26
  43. (Unrelated) Great Falls Tribune, Great Falls, Montana, Tuesday, March 24, 1959 - Page 11
  44. (Unrelated) The Daily Times, Salisbury, Maryland, Tuesday, March 24, 1959 - Page 9

April 1959

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, April 01, 1959 - Page 50, “Fischer Takes Match: U.S. Chess Champion Defeats Shocron in Argentina”
  2. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Arizona Daily Star, Tucson, Arizona, Wednesday, April 01, 1959 - Page 26, “Sports In Brief”
  3. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Wednesday, April 01, 1959 - Page 21, “Fischer Victor Over Shocron”
  4. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Morning News, Wilmington, Delaware, Wednesday, April 01, 1959 - Page 40, “Fischer Chess Victor”
  5. (Duplicate) () The Baltimore Sun, Baltimore, Maryland, Wednesday, April 01, 1959 - Page 17, “Fischer Wins In Chess”
  6. (Duplicate) () The Morning Herald, Uniontown, Pennsylvania, Wednesday, April 01, 1959 - Page 15, “Chess Whiz Scores Draw”
  7. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Cincinnati Enquirer, Cincinnati, Ohio, Thursday, April 02, 1959 - Page 34, “Fischer In Draw”
  8. (Duplicate) () The Morning News, Wilmington, Delaware, Thursday, April 02, 1959 - Page 36, “Chess Draw”
  9. (Duplicate) () Arizona Republic, Phoenix, Arizona, Thursday, April 02, 1959 - Page 47, “U.S. Chess Champ Wins”
  10. (Duplicate) () Arizona Republic, Phoenix, Arizona, Thursday, April 02, 1959 - Page 65, “U.S. Chess Champ Wins”
  11. (Duplicate) () The Cincinnati Enquirer, Cincinnati, Ohio, Thursday, April 02, 1959 - Page 28, “Fischer In Draw”
  12. (Duplicate) () The Tennessean, Nashville, Tennessee, Thursday, April 02, 1959 - Page 28, “U.S. Chess Champ Ties”
  13. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Montgomery Advertiser, Montgomery, Alabama, Saturday, April 04, 1959 - Page 10, “Fischer Grabs 2nd In Chess Tournament”
  14. (Duplicate) () The Daily Capital News, Jefferson City, Missouri, Saturday, April 04, 1959 - Page 5, “Young Chess Champion Gains 2nd Place Tie”
  15. (Duplicate) () Kingsport News, Kingsport, Tennessee, Saturday, April 04, 1959 - Page 6, “Chess Champ Wins”
  16. (Duplicate) () The Morning News, Wilmington, Delaware, Saturday, April 04, 1959 - Page 29, “Fischer Chess Winner”
  17. (Duplicate) () The Montana Standard, Butte, Montana, Saturday, April 04, 1959 - Page 9, “Yank Boy Moves Up”
  18. (Duplicate) () Clarion-Ledger, Jackson, Mississippi, Saturday, April 04, 1959 - Page 8, “Bobby Fischer Gains 2nd In Chess Meet”
  19. (Duplicate) () The Pocono Record, Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania, Saturday, April 04, 1959 - Page 8, “Chess Champ Ties”
  20. (Duplicate) () Messenger-Inquirer, Owensboro, Kentucky, Saturday, April 04, 1959 - Page 11, “Chess Win”
  21. (Duplicate) () The Kansas City Times, Kansas City, Missouri, Saturday, April 04, 1959 - Page 24, “Chess Wizard Wins”
  22. (Duplicate) () The News, Frederick, Maryland, Saturday, April 04, 1959 - Page 5, “Ties For 2nd In Chess”
  23. (Duplicate) () Standard-Sentinel, Hazleton, Pennsylvania, Saturday, April 04, 1959 - Page 18, “Whiz Kid”
  24. (Duplicate) () Palladium-Item, Richmond, Indiana, Saturday, April 04, 1959 - Page 8, “Ties For Second”
  25. (Duplicate) () Casper Morning Star, Casper, Wyoming, Saturday, April 04, 1959 - Page 28, “Fischer In 2nd Tie”
  26. (Duplicate) () Anderson Herald, Anderson, Indiana, Saturday, April 04, 1959 - Page 6, “U.S. Chess Champ Ties In International Play”
  27. (Duplicate) () The Daily Telegram, Eau Claire, Wisconsin, Saturday, April 04, 1959 - Page 11, “Tied for Second”
  28. (Duplicate) () The Logansport Press, Logansport, Indiana, Saturday, April 04, 1959 - Page 7, “Gains Tie”
  29. (Duplicate) () The Pocono Record, Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania, Saturday, April 04, 1959 - Page 20, “Chess Champ Ties”
  30. (Duplicate) () The Waco News-Tribune, Waco, Texas, Saturday, April 04, 1959 - Page 1, “Chess Champ Gains”
  31. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, April 05, 1959 - Page 64, “Fischer Turns Up In Mar Del Plata”
  32. (Duplicate) () The Corpus Christi Caller-Times, Corpus Christi, Texas, Sunday, April 05, 1959 - Page 32, “Chats on Chess”
  33. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Jackson Sun, Jackson, Tennessee, Sunday, April 05, 1959 - Page 16, “Fischer Wins”
  34. (Duplicate) () The Paris News, Paris, Texas, Sunday, April 05, 1959 - Page 9, “Chess Champ Wins 8th”
  35. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Tampa Tribune, Tampa, Florida, Sunday, April 05, 1959 - Page 55, “Young U.S. Chess Champ Wins Eighth Straight In Meet”
  36. (Duplicate) () Poughkeepsie Journal, Poughkeepsie, New York, Sunday, April 05, 1959 - Page 3B, “Fischer Wins 8th In Chess Tourney”
  37. (Duplicate) () Logansport Pharos-Tribune, Logansport, Indiana, Sunday, April 05, 1959 - Page 9, “Chess Champ Wins”
  38. (Duplicate) () Press and Sun-Bulletin, Binghamton, New York, Sunday, April 05, 1959 - Page 6, “'Chess' Started Slow”
  39. (Duplicate) () The Courier, Waterloo, Iowa, Sunday, April 05, 1959 - Page 2, “Yank Boy, 16, Wins In Chess Tourney”
  40. (Duplicate) () The Independent Record, Helena, Montana, Sunday, April 05, 1959 - Page 9, “Chess Champ Wins”
  41. (Duplicate) () The Advocate-Messenger, Danville, Kentucky, Sunday, April 05, 1959 - Page 10, “Chess Champ Unbeaten In 8 Straight Games”
  42. (Duplicate) () The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Sunday, April 05, 1959 - Page 14, “Chess Champion Takes 8 Straight”
  43. (Duplicate) () The Orlando Sentinel, Orlando, Florida, Sunday, April 05, 1959 - Page 5, “Fischer Undefeated”
  44. (Duplicate) () Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Sunday, April 05, 1959 - Page 25, “Fischer Defeats Argentine Champ”
  45. (Duplicate) () Jefferson City Post-Tribune, Jefferson City, Missouri, Sunday, April 05, 1959 - Page 4, “Tied for Second”
  46. (Duplicate) () The Orlando Sentinel, Orlando, Florida, Sunday, April 05, 1959 - Page 44, “Fischer Undefeated”
  47. (Duplicate) () Messenger-Inquirer, Owensboro, Kentucky, Sunday, April 05, 1959 - Page 13, “Boy Wins Eighth Game”
  48. (Duplicate) () Kingsport Times-News, Kingsport, Tennessee, Sunday, April 05, 1959 - Page 24, “Victorious Again”
  49. (Duplicate) () The Missoulian, Missoula, Montana, Sunday, April 05, 1959 - Page 30, “Eight Straight Wins”
  50. (Duplicate) () Anderson Herald, Anderson, Indiana, Sunday, April 05, 1959 - Page 20, “Bobby Fischer Wins His 8th Straight In Tourney”
  51. (Duplicate) () The Montana Standard, Butte, Montana, Sunday, April 05, 1959 - Page 32, “Wins 8th Straight”
  52. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, April 07, 1959 - Page 44, “Fischer Chess Victor: U.S. Champion Tops Rossetto in 37 Moves in Argentina”
  53. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Tuesday, April 07, 1959 - Page 23, “Boy Chess Champ Beats Argentine”
  54. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Tuesday, April 07, 1959, “Fischer Runs String to 9”
  55. (Duplicate) () The Des Moines Register, Des Moines, Iowa, Tuesday, April 07, 1959 - Page 13, “Streak To 9”
  56. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, April 09, 1959 - Page 39, “Fischer Turns Back Argentine In Chess”
  57. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Tennessean, Nashville, Tennessee, Thursday, April 09, 1959 - Page 35, “U.S. Chess Champ 2nd”
  58. (Duplicate) () The Tennessean, Nashville, Tennessee, Thursday, April 09, 1959 - Page 35, “U.S. Chess Champ 2nd”
  59. (Duplicate) () Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Thursday, April 09, 1959 - Page 24, “Fischer Wins In Chess Play”
  60. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Cincinnati Enquirer, Cincinnati, Ohio, Thursday, April 09, 1959 - Page 53, “Fischer Winner”
  61. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Pensacola News Journal, Pensacola, Florida, Thursday, April 09, 1959 - Page 21, “Tied For Second”
  62. (Duplicate) () The Pantagraph, Bloomington, Illinois, Thursday, April 09, 1959 - Page 12, “Chess Prodigy Wins”
  63. (Duplicate) () Nanaimo Daily News, Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada, Thursday, April 09, 1959 - Page 15, “Chess Tourney”
  64. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, April 10, 1959 - Page 41, “2 Share Honors In Chess Tourney: Pachman, Najdorf Deadlock in Argentina — Fischer Ties for Third Place”
  65. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Friday, April 10, 1959 - Page 22, “Fischer Ties For Third in Chess”
  66. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Cincinnati Enquirer, Cincinnati, Ohio, Friday, April 10, 1959 - Page 55, “Fischer Stays In Title Hunt”
  67. (Duplicate) () The Indianapolis News, Indianapolis, Indiana, Friday, April 10, 1959 - Page 34, “Chess”
  68. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, April 11, 1959 - Page 18, “Najdorf Record In Chess Studied: Argentine Is Only Player at Mar del Plata to Finish With No Setbacks”
  69. (Duplicate) () The Lincoln Star, Lincoln, Nebraska, Saturday, April 11, 1959 - Page 15, “Fischer Is Third”
  70. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, April 12, 1959 - Page 73, “Fischer Advances In Argentine Chess”
  71. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Thursday, April 16, 1959 - Page 7, “Mar del Plata tournament”
  72. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, April 19, 1959 - Page 67, “Najdorf, Pachman Tie In Argentina”
  73. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa, California, Sunday, April 19, 1959 - Page 46, “Gossip from Holland”
  74. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Des Moines Tribune, Des Moines, Iowa, Monday, April 20, 1959 - Page 9, “Chess Star, 16, Balks--Money”
  75. (Duplicate) () The Courier, Waterloo, Iowa, Monday, April 20, 1959 - Page 15, “Almost Quits Chess Meet Over Money”
  76. (Duplicate) () The Minneapolis Star, Minneapolis, Minnesota, Monday, April 20, 1959 - Page 36, “Bobby Fischer, 16-year-old U.S. chess ace threatened to walk out on the Santiago (Chile) tournament”
  77. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, April 22, 1959 - Page 40, “Fischer Plays Draw In Chess”
  78. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Wednesday, April 22, 1959 - Page 19, “Fischer Draws”
  79. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky, Wednesday, April 22, 1959 - Page 23, “U.S. Chess Champ In Draw”
  80. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, April 23, 1959 - Page 38, “Fischer Has Advantage: Enjoys Edge Over Brazilian as Chess Match Adjourns”
  81. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, April 23, 1959 - Page 23, “Bobby Fischer Competing In Tourney at Santiago”
  82. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Thursday, April 23, 1959, “Fischer's Chess Match Suspended”
  83. (Duplicate) () The Post-Standard, Syracuse, New York, Thursday, April 23, 1959 - Page 26, “U.S. Schoolboy Plays Two Chess Draws”
  84. (Duplicate) () The Morning News, Wilmington, Delaware, Thursday, April 23, 1959 - Page 29, “No Decision”
  85. (Duplicate) () The Tennessean, Nashville, Tennessee, Thursday, April 23, 1959 - Page 42, “U.S. Champ Yet To Win”
  86. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, April 24, 1959 - Page 31, “Fischer Adjourns With Ivkov”
  87. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Orlando Sentinel, Orlando, Florida, Friday, April 24, 1959 - Page 40, “Fischer Wins Again”
  88. (Duplicate) () The Atlanta Constitution, Atlanta, Georgia, Friday, April 24, 1959 - Page 43, “Fischer Game Suspended”
  89. (Duplicate) () The Tennessean, Nashville, Tennessee, Friday, April 24, 1959 - Page 39, “U.S. Chess Champ Draws”
  90. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, April 25, 1959 - Page 18, “Fischer Foe Has Edge: Sanguinetti Adjourns After 42 Moves in Santiago Chess”
  91. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Post-Standard, Syracuse, New York, Saturday, April 25, 1959 - Page 10, “Chess Match Suspended”
  92. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Saturday, April 25, 1959 - Page 11, “4th Fischer Match Suspended”
  93. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, April 26, 1959 - Page 264, “Fischer Victor in Chess: Defeats M. Stekel of Chile”
  94. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, April 26, 1959 - Page 51, “Fischer in Santiago”
  95. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Poughkeepsie Journal, Poughkeepsie, New York, Sunday, April 26, 1959 - Page 4, “Names in the News From AP Dispatches”
  96. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Monday, April 27, 1959 - Page 12, “Fischer Wins Chess Match Over Stekel”
  97. (Duplicate) () The Daily Tribune, Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin, Wednesday, April 29, 1959 - Page 11, “Raising A Genius Is Not Easy”
  98. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, April 30, 1959 - Page 42, “Fischer Chess Victor: Defeats Letelier in Seventh Round of Santiago Play”
  99. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Thursday, April 30, 1959 - Page 12, “Bobby Fischer at Santiago, Chile Interzonal Tournament”
  100. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Thursday, April 30, 1959 - Page 25, “Fischer Defeats Chilean Champ”
  101. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Cincinnati Enquirer, Cincinnati, Ohio, Thursday, April 30, 1959 - Page 49, “Wins Chess Match”
  102. (Duplicate) () The Cincinnati Enquirer, Cincinnati, Ohio, Thursday, April 30, 1959 - Page 58, “Wins Chess Match”
  103. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Chicago Tribune, Chicago, Illinois, Thursday, April 30, 1959 - Page 74, “Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn, 16 year old United States champion, won his seventh round match”
  104. (Unrelated) The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky, Saturday, April 04, 1959 - Page 19
  105. (Unrelated) The Sandusky Register, Sandusky, Ohio, Wednesday, April 15, 1959 - Page 8
  106. (Unrelated) The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky, Wednesday, April 15, 1959 - Page 23
  107. (Unrelated) Anderson Herald, Anderson, Indiana, Friday, April 17, 1959 - Page 20
  108. (Unrelated) The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky, Tuesday, April 28, 1959 - Page 24
  109. (Unrelated) Poughkeepsie Journal, Poughkeepsie, New York, Wednesday, April 29, 1959 - Page 33

May 1959

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, May 01, 1959 - Page 26, “Fischer Match Suspended”
  2. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Friday, May 01, 1959 - Page 24, “Match Suspended”
  3. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, May 02, 1959 - Page 17, “Chess Stars Adjourn: Fischer Halts Match Against Flores After 40 Moves”
  4. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Tennessean, Nashville, Tennessee, Saturday, May 02, 1959 - Page 13, “Young U.S. Chess Ace Halts Match Holds Tie”
  5. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Express and News, San Antonio, Texas, Saturday, May 02, 1959 - Page 57, “Argentinian Chess Tournament Results”
  6. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, May 03, 1959 - Page 239, “Chilean Beats Fischer: U.S. Chess Champion Bows to Juaregui in 40 Moves”
  7. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky, Sunday, May 03, 1959 - Page 52, “Chess Tournament”
  8. (Not directly related) () () The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, May 03, 1959 - Page 274, “Your Move”
  9. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, May 04, 1959 - Page 45, “Fischer Wins, Draws: Beats Romo and Splits Point With Flores in Chess”
  10. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Tampa Bay Times, St. Petersburg, Florida, Monday, May 04, 1959 - Page 40, “Fischer Defeats Romo In Chile”
  11. (Duplicate) () The Orlando Sentinel, Orlando, Florida, Monday, May 04, 1959 - Page 4, “Fischer Wins, Ties”
  12. (Duplicate) () The Des Moines Register, Des Moines, Iowa, Monday, May 04, 1959 - Page 18, “Wins One, Ties One”
  13. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Salt Lake Tribune, Salt Lake City, Utah, Wednesday, May 06, 1959 - Page 50, “Keeps Chess Lead.”
  14. (Duplicate) () The Salt Lake Tribune, Salt Lake City, Utah, Wednesday, May 06, 1959 - Page 14, “Keeps Chess Lead.”
  15. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, May 08, 1959 - Page 36, “Chess Ends In Tie”
  16. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, May 10, 1959 - Page 75, “Santiago Tournament”
  17. (Duplicate) () The Corpus Christi Caller-Times, Corpus Christi, Texas, Sunday, May 10, 1959 - Page 22, “Chats On Chess”
  18. (Library/Book List) () Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Wednesday, May 13, 1959 - Page 41, “Books Received”
  19. (Library/Book List) () Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Wednesday, May 13, 1959 - Page 4, “Books Received”
  20. (Library/Book List) () Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Wednesday, May 13, 1959 - Page 5, “Books Received”
  21. (Library/Book List) () Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Wednesday, May 13, 1959 - Page 43, “Books Received”
  22. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Capital Journal, Salem, Oregon, Thursday, May 14, 1959 - Page 4, “A Smile or Two”
  23. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, May 17, 1959 - Page 70, “Santiago Tournament”
  24. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, May 17, 1959 - Page 247, “Fischer To Play In Zurich Chess”
  25. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Wednesday, May 20, 1959 - Page 18, “Match Adjourned”
  26. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, May 20, 1959 - Page 45, “Fischer Adjourns In Weak Position”
  27. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, May 21, 1959 - Page 38, “Fischer Rallies in Chess Match Before 2d Adjournment at Zurich”
  28. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Thursday, May 21, 1959 - Page 33, “Fischer's Chess Match Adjourned”
  29. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, May 22, 1959 - Page 22, “Fischer, Gligoric Share Chess Lead: U.S. Champion Scores Twice and Gains Draw on Third Day of Zurich Tourney”
  30. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Baltimore Sun, Baltimore, Maryland, Friday, May 22, 1959 - Page 22, “Fischer Leads In Chess”
  31. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Tennessean, Nashville, Tennessee, Friday, May 22, 1959 - Page 44, “Brooklyn Chess Ace Tied In International Meet”
  32. (Duplicate) () The Atlanta Constitution, Atlanta, Georgia, Friday, May 22, 1959 - Page 41, “Brooklyn Teenager Bobby Fischer and Svetozar Gligoric of Yugoslavia took the lead over Russia's Mikhail Tal”
  33. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, May 23, 1959 - Page 21, “Olafsson Draws In Zurich Chess: Fischer Tied for First with Gligoric ”
  34. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The News, Frederick, Maryland, Saturday, May 23, 1959 - Page 3, “Fischer Leads At Chess”
  35. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, May 24, 1959 - Page 31, “Interzonal Contest”
  36. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, May 24, 1959 - Page 256, “Fischer Defeats Kupper In Zurich: U.S. Star Gains Undisputed Possession of 1st Place in Chess Tournament”
  37. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Oakland Tribune, Oakland, California, Sunday, May 24, 1959 - Page 24, “U.S. Youth Takes Chess Tourney Lead”
  38. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, May 25, 1959 - Page 39, “Blau Holds Fischer To Draw At Zurich”
  39. (Duplicate) () The Morning Herald, Hagerstown, Maryland, Monday, May 25, 1959 - Page 17, “Bobby Fischer In Chess Lead”
  40. (Duplicate) () The Morning Herald, Hagerstown, Maryland, Monday, May 25, 1959 - Page 17, “Bobby Fischer In Chess Lead”
  41. (Duplicate) () The Amarillo Globe-Times, Amarillo, Texas, Monday, May 25, 1959 - Page 14, “We Will Pay for Anything But Brains”
  42. (Duplicate) () Independent, Long Beach, California, Monday, May 25, 1959 - Page 14, “Chess Champions Don't Die Rich”
  43. (Duplicate) () Battle Creek Enquirer, Battle Creek, Michigan, Monday, May 25, 1959 - Page 6, “Chess Champs Will Never Die Wealthy”
  44. (Duplicate) () Detroit Free Press, Detroit, Michigan, Monday, May 25, 1959 - Page 8, “No Dough In Game Of Brains”
  45. (Duplicate) () The Missoulian, Missoula, Montana, Monday, May 25, 1959 - Page 4, “Fischer Takes Lead In Chess Tourney”
  46. (Duplicate) () Messenger-Inquirer, Owensboro, Kentucky, Monday, May 25, 1959 - Page 13, “Fischer Takes Lead In International Chess Tournament”
  47. (Duplicate) () Standard-Sentinel, Hazleton, Pennsylvania, Monday, May 25, 1959 - Page 15, “U.S. Chess Player Leads Tournament”
  48. (Duplicate) () The Pocono Record, Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania, Monday, May 25, 1959 - Page 21, “Yank King Leads Chess Tourney”
  49. (Duplicate) () The Oil City Derrick, Oil City, Pennsylvania, Monday, May 25, 1959 - Page 13, “U.S. Champion Cops Chess Lead”
  50. (Duplicate) () The Tampa Tribune, Tampa, Florida, Monday, May 25, 1959 - Page 21, “Takes Clear Lead”
  51. (Duplicate) () The Pocono Record, Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania, Monday, May 25, 1959 - Page 9, “Yank King Leads Chess Tourney”
  52. (Duplicate) () Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Monday, May 25, 1959 - Page 13, “Fischer Takes Lead In Chess Tourney”
  53. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Tuesday, May 26, 1959 - Page 17, “Chess the Most Underpaid Intellectual Profession”
  54. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, May 26, 1959 - Page 42, “Kupper and Larsen Play Draw In Chess”
  55. (Duplicate) () The Des Moines Register, Des Moines, Iowa, Tuesday, May 26, 1959 - Page 16, “Champions At Chess Die Poor”
  56. (Duplicate) () The Morning Call, Allentown, Pennsylvania, Tuesday, May 26, 1959 - Page 12, “Unprofitable”
  57. (Duplicate) () The Morning Call, Allentown, Pennsylvania, Tuesday, May 26, 1959 - Page 7, “Unprofitable”
  58. (Duplicate) () The Morning Call, Allentown, Pennsylvania, Tuesday, May 26, 1959 - Page 6, “Unprofitable”
  59. (Duplicate) () The Daily Times-News, Burlington, North Carolina, Wednesday, May 27, 1959 - Page 30, “16-Year-Old Chess Champion Found To Be In Need Of Assurance”
  60. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, May 27, 1959 - Page 46, “Keres, Tal Draw In Zurich Chess: Fischer and Larsen Adjourn Game”
  61. (Duplicate) () The Progress-Index, Petersburg, Virginia, Wednesday, May 27, 1959 - Page 1, “16-Year Old Chess Champ Requires Reassurance”
  62. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Reno Gazette-Journal, Reno, Nevada, Wednesday, May 27, 1959, “Chess Whiz Kid Adjourns Match”
  63. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, May 28, 1959 - Page 38, “Fischer Is Victor In Zurich Chess: Turns Back Duckstein in 22 Moves—Tal Tops Keller and Leads in Tourney”
  64. (Duplicate) () The Rhinelander Daily News, Rhinelander, Wisconsin, Thursday, May 28, 1959 - Page 10, “Chess Prodigy Bobby Fischer Needs Reassurance”
  65. (Duplicate) () Freeport Journal-Standard, Freeport, Illinois, Thursday, May 28, 1959 - Page 11, “Chess Champ, 16, Needs Reassurance”
  66. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Austin Daily Herald, Austin, Minnesota, Thursday, May 28, 1959 - Page 10, “Chess Winner”
  67. (Duplicate) () The Morning Herald, Uniontown, Pennsylvania, Thursday, May 28, 1959 - Page 37, “Fischer Leads”
  68. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Guardian, London, Greater London, England, Thursday, May 28, 1959, “Zurich tournament”
  69. (Duplicate) () The Des Moines Register, Des Moines, Iowa, Thursday, May 28, 1959 - Page 17, “Fischer Wins”
  70. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, May 29, 1959 - Page 20, “Fischer Adjourns Two Chess Games: Puts Off Tests With Larsen and Unzicker—Tal Beats Walther at Zurich”
  71. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) (Image) Casper Star-Tribune, Casper, Wyoming, Friday, May 29, 1959 - Page 11, “16-Year-Old Chess Champ Is Typical Teenage Type”
  72. (Duplicate) () The La Crosse Tribune, La Crosse, Wisconsin, Friday, May 29, 1959 - Page 16, “16-Year-Old Boy Is U.S. Chess Champion”
  73. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Baltimore Sun, Baltimore, Maryland, Saturday, May 30, 1959 - Page 12, “Fischer Wins Match”
  74. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, May 30, 1959 - Page 13, “Fischer Ties Tal For Lead In Chess: Brooklyn Youth Draws With Larsen in 92 Moves and Beats Unzicker in 66”
  75. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Pensacola News Journal, Pensacola, Florida, Saturday, May 30, 1959 - Page 11, “Fischer Gains Tie In Chess Tourney”
  76. (Duplicate) () The Orlando Sentinel, Orlando, Florida, Saturday, May 30, 1959 - Page 5, “Fischer Wins Match”
  77. (Duplicate) () The Cincinnati Enquirer, Cincinnati, Ohio, Saturday, May 30, 1959 - Page 15, “Ties For Lead”
  78. (Duplicate) () The Cincinnati Enquirer, Cincinnati, Ohio, Saturday, May 30, 1959 - Page 19, “Ties For Lead”
  79. (Duplicate) () The Orlando Sentinel, Orlando, Florida, Saturday, May 30, 1959 - Page 12, “Fischer Wins Match”
  80. The Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Saturday, May 30, 1959 - Page 5 “Fischer Ties in Chess”
  81. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, May 31, 1959 - Page 193, “Fischer Adjourns 9th-Round Match: He Holds Slight Edge Over Barcza After 42 Moves in Zurich Chess”
  82. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) (Image) Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, May 31, 1959 - Page 21, “Chess by G.E. Avery”
  83. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Lansing State Journal, Lansing, Michigan, Sunday, May 31, 1959 - Page 24, “Tips From 15-Year-Old Champion: Keep Other Thoughts Away, Says Fischer”
  84. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) (Image) The Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles, California, Sunday, May 31, 1959 - Page 73, “Fischer Tied For Lead In Zurich Tournament and Santiago Tourney”
  85. (Duplicate) () The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky, Sunday, May 31, 1959 - Page 123, “Quiet!”
  86. (Duplicate) () The Times, Munster, Indiana, Sunday, May 31, 1959 - Page 62, “Chess Champ, 15, Offers Advice”
  87. (Duplicate) () Daily Press, Newport News, Virginia, Sunday, May 31, 1959 - Page 28, “Tips From A Teen-Age Champion”
  88. (Duplicate) () The Pantagraph, Bloomington, Illinois, Sunday, May 31, 1959 - Page 26, “Fischer Shares Lead”
  89. (Unrelated) The Indiana Gazette, Indiana, Pennsylvania, Friday, May 01, 1959 - Page 19
  90. (Unrelated) The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky, Wednesday, May 06, 1959 - Page 25
  91. (Unrelated) News-Press, Fort Myers, Florida, Sunday, May 10, 1959 - Page 10
  92. (Unrelated) The Press Democrat, Santa Rosa, California, Wednesday, May 13, 1959 - Page 22
  93. (Unrelated) Fairbanks Daily News-Miner, Fairbanks, Alaska, Wednesday, May 13, 1959 - Page 8
  94. (Unrelated) Press and Sun-Bulletin, Binghamton, New York, Friday, May 15, 1959 - Page 23
  95. (Unrelated) The Lincoln Star, Lincoln, Nebraska, Saturday, May 16, 1959 - Page 13
  96. (Unrelated) Lincoln Journal Star, Lincoln, Nebraska, Saturday, May 23, 1959 - Page 2
  97. (Unrelated) The Record-Argus, Greenville, Pennsylvania, Monday, May 25, 1959 - Page 8
  98. (Unrelated) Oswego Palladium-Times, Oswego, New York, Friday, May 29, 1959 - Page 4

June 1959

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, June 01, 1959, “Tal Wins Twice In Zurich Chess: Regains Lead at 8½-1½—Fischer Beats Nievergelt, Adjourns With Barcza”
  2. (Library/Book List) () The News Journal, Wilmington, Delaware, Monday, June 01, 1959 - Page 19, “Spotlight on Books”
  3. (Duplicate) () Clarion-Ledger Jackson, Mississippi Monday, June 01, 1959 - Page 2, “Time Doesn't Drag If You Play Well”
  4. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, June 02, 1959 - Page 43, “Fischer Draws In 95-Move Game: Barcza of Hungary Repels U.S. Champion's Attacks in Zurich Chess”
  5. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Tampa Tribune Tampa, Florida Tuesday, June 02, 1959 - Page 22, “Draw In Chess Match”
  6. (Duplicate) () The Tampa Tribune Tampa, Florida Tuesday, June 02, 1959 - Page 6, “Draw In Chess Match”
  7. (Duplicate) () The Burlington Free Press Burlington, Vermont Tuesday, June 02, 1959 - Page 13, “Fischer in Second In Int'l Chess Play”
  8. (Duplicate) () Asbury Park Press Asbury Park, New Jersey Tuesday, June 02, 1959 - Page 8, “Fischer Drops To 2nd in Chess”
  9. (Duplicate) () The Morning Herald Hagerstown, Maryland Tuesday, June 02, 1959 - Page 13, “Bobby Fischer Is Held To A Draw”
  10. (Duplicate) () The Cincinnati Enquirer Cincinnati, Ohio Tuesday, June 02, 1959 - Page 3, “Fischer Draws”
  11. (Duplicate) () Greeley Daily Tribune Greeley, Colorado Tuesday, June 02, 1959 - Page 12, “Held to Draw”
  12. (Duplicate) () Casper Morning Star Casper, Wyoming Tuesday, June 02, 1959 - Page 26, “Young Fischer Held To Draw At Chess”
  13. (Duplicate) () The Morning Herald Uniontown, Pennsylvania Tuesday, June 02, 1959 - Page 13, “Young Fischer Held To Draw At Chess”
  14. (Duplicate) () The Daily Capital News Jefferson City, Missouri Tuesday, June 02, 1959 - Page 4, “U.S Chess Champ Held to Draw in Match”
  15. (Duplicate) () The Oil City Derrick Oil City, Pennsylvania Tuesday, June 02, 1959 - Page 4, “U.S. Chess Champ Is Held To Draw”
  16. (Duplicate) () Beckley Post-Herald Beckley, West Virginia Tuesday, June 02, 1959 - Page 10, “Chess Match”
  17. (Duplicate) () Standard-Sentinel Hazleton, Pennsylvania Tuesday, June 02, 1959 - Page 1, “Held To A Draw”
  18. (Duplicate) () The Montana Standard Butte, Montana Tuesday, June 02, 1959 - Page 14, “Ends In Draw”
  19. (Duplicate) () The News-Review Roseburg, Oregon Tuesday, June 02, 1959 - Page 6, “Chess”
  20. (Duplicate) () The Plain Speaker Hazleton, Pennsylvania Tuesday, June 02, 1959 - Page 20, “Chess”
  21. (Duplicate) () The Daily Chronicle Centralia, Washington Tuesday, June 02, 1959 - Page 4, “Chess”
  22. (Duplicate) () The Missoulian Missoula, Montana Tuesday, June 02, 1959 - Page 2, “Held To Draw”
  23. (Duplicate) () Arizona Daily Star Tucson, Arizona Tuesday, June 02, 1959 - Page 6, “Held to Draw”
  24. (Duplicate) () Fairbanks Daily News-Miner Fairbanks, Alaska Tuesday, June 02, 1959 - Page 8, “Chess”
  25. (Duplicate) () The Lincoln Star Lincoln, Nebraska Tuesday, June 02, 1959 - Page 13, “U.S. Master Draws”
  26. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, June 03, 1959 - Page 42, “Fischer Suffers First Chess Loss: U.S. Champion Is Beaten by Gligoric Who Ties Him for Second at Zurich”
  27. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Asbury Park Press Asbury Park, New Jersey Wednesday, June 03, 1959 - Page 18, “Fischer Is Chess Victim”
  28. (Duplicate) () Reno Gazette-Journal Reno, Nevada Wednesday, June 03, 1959 - Page 20, “Chess Whiz Kid Loses to Slav”
  29. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, June 04, 1959 - Page 38, “Tal Wins, Increases Zurich Chess Lead”
  30. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The News Journal Wilmington, Delaware Thursday, June 04, 1959 - Page 6, “Fischer Eyes Second In Chess Tournament”
  31. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Tampa Bay Times St. Petersburg, Florida Thursday, June 04, 1959 - Page 22, “Tal Increases Chess Lead Over Fischer”
  32. (Duplicate) () Tampa Bay Times St. Petersburg, Florida Thursday, June 04, 1959 - Page 39, “Tal Increases Chess Lead Over Fischer”
  33. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Oakland Tribune Oakland, California Thursday, June 04, 1959 - Page 20, “Russian Leading In Chess Tourney”
  34. (Duplicate) () Arizona Daily Star Tucson, Arizona Thursday, June 04, 1959 - Page 32, “Chess”
  35. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, June 05, 1959 - Page 23, “Fischer Defeats Donner In Chess: Wins in 44 Moves at Zurich”
  36. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Asbury Park Press Asbury Park, New Jersey Friday, June 05, 1959 - Page 25, “In Chess Tournament”
  37. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, June 06, 1959 - Page 17, “2 Russians Beaten In Chess At Zurich”
  38. (Duplicate) () The Baltimore Sun Baltimore, Maryland Friday, June 05, 1959 - Page 19, “Bobby Fischer Gains”
  39. (Duplicate) () Albany Democrat-Herald Albany, Oregon Saturday, June 06, 1959 - Page 12, “Chess Champion, 16, Needs Reassurance”
  40. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Asbury Park Press Asbury Park, New Jersey Saturday, June 06, 1959 - Page 13, “Fischer and Tal Tied in Chess”
  41. (Duplicate) () Reno Gazette-Journal Reno, Nevada Saturday, June 06, 1959 - Page 10, “Yankee Prodigy Ties Russian In Chess Meet”
  42. (Duplicate) () The Post-Standard Syracuse, New York Saturday, June 06, 1959 - Page 9, “Fischer Ties Grand Master”
  43. (Duplicate) () The Post-Standard Syracuse, New York Saturday, June 06, 1959 - Page 10, “Fischer Ties Grand Master”
  44. (Duplicate) () The Pantagraph Bloomington, Illinois Saturday, June 06, 1959 - Page 8, “Fischer Shares Lead”
  45. (Duplicate) () The Atlanta Constitution Atlanta, Georgia Saturday, June 06, 1959 - Page 13, “Tied”
  46. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, June 07, 1959 - Page 252, “Tal Tops Donner In Zurich Chess—Fischer Adjourns Game With Keller”
  47. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () () (Image) (Image) The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Sunday, June 07, 1959 - Page 60, “Valuable Additions: Fischer's Games, Lasker's Biography Issued”
  48. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Oakland Tribune Oakland, California Sunday, June 07, 1959 - Page 61, “Russian Leader in Chess Tourney”
  49. (Duplicate) () The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, June 07, 1959 - Page 458, “Teen-Agers - Anyone for Chess?”
  50. (Duplicate) () Asbury Park Press Asbury Park, New Jersey Sunday, June 07, 1959 - Page 19, “Fischer Drops To 2nd in Chess”
  51. (Duplicate) () The Lawton Constitution And Morning Press Lawton, Oklahoma Sunday, June 07, 1959 - Page 14, “Takes Chess Lead”
  52. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, June 08, 1959 - Page 37, “Tal and Fischer Draw At Zurich: Russian Clinches at Least Tie for Chess Honors”
  53. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Reno Gazette-Journal Reno, Nevada Monday, June 08, 1959 - Page 16, “Fischer Ties Russian Star”
  54. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Des Moines Register Des Moines, Iowa Monday, June 08, 1959 - Page 19, “Fischer Loses”
  55. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Times Shreveport, Louisiana Monday, June 08, 1959 - Page 7, “Fischer in Draw With Red Player”
  56. (Duplicate) () Asbury Park Press Asbury Park, New Jersey Monday, June 08, 1959 - Page 12, “Fischer Is 2nd in Chess”
  57. (Duplicate) () Chicago Tribune Chicago, Illinois Monday, June 08, 1959 - Page 66, “Dieter Keller of Switzerland defeated Bobby Fischer from New York”
  58. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, June 09, 1959 - Page 49, “Tal, Soviet Union, Is Zurich Victor: Fischer Applauded at Reception”
  59. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Asbury Park Press Asbury Park, New Jersey Tuesday, June 09, 1959 - Page 20, “Russian Wins Chess Crown”
  60. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Missoulian Missoula, Montana Tuesday, June 09, 1959 - Page 12, “Wins Chess Tourney”
  61. (Duplicate) () The Journal Times Racine, Wisconsin Tuesday, June 09, 1959 - Page 16, “Tal Chess Champ, Fischer Third”
  62. (Duplicate) () The Morning Herald Hagerstown, Maryland Tuesday, June 09, 1959 - Page 16, “Russian Wins Chess Tourney”
  63. (Duplicate) () Arizona Daily Star Tucson, Arizona Tuesday, June 09, 1959 - Page 12, “Russian Is Winner In Chess Tourney”
  64. (Duplicate) () The Baltimore Sun Baltimore, Maryland Tuesday, June 09, 1959 - Page 20, “Russia's Tal Takes Chess Tournament”
  65. (Duplicate) () The Logansport Press Logansport, Indiana Wednesday, June 10, 1959 - Page 14, “Russian Winner Of World Chess Title”
  66. (Duplicate) () Carrol Daily Times Herald Carroll, Iowa Thursday, June 11, 1959 - Page 3, “Chess Champ, 16, Needs Assurance, But Not The Kind You Might Think”
  67. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Guardian London, Greater London, England Thursday, June 11, 1959 - Page 7, “The Ruy Lopez”
  68. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post Camden, New Jersey Thursday, June 11, 1959 - Page 21, “Mikhail Tal”
  69. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) (Image) The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, June 14, 1959 - Page 84, “Tal Wins At Zurich; Fischer Is Third”
  70. (Duplicate) () The Pittsburgh Press Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Sunday, June 14, 1959 - Page 88, “Concentration Prime Factor For Champ”
  71. (Brief mention: Bobby in Third Place) () Hartford Courant Hartford, Connecticut Sunday, June 14, 1959 - Page 27, “Chess by G.E. Avery”
  72. (Duplicate) () The Eugene Guard Eugene, Oregon Monday, June 15, 1959 - Page 12, “16-Year-Old Champ Needs Reassurance”
  73. (Duplicate) () Arizona Daily Star Tucson, Arizona Thursday, June 18, 1959 - Page 24, “Newsman Has Solution For Bobby's Problem”
  74. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Courier-Post Camden, New Jersey Thursday, June 18, 1959 - Page 12, “Silver Anniversary of the Log Cabin Chess Club”
  75. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Express and News San Antonio, Texas Saturday, June 20, 1959 - Page 54, “Bobby Fischer is Restless, Patient, Tenacious and Resilient”
  76. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Sunday Gazette-Mail Charleston, West Virginia Sunday, June 21, 1959 - Page 63, “Young U.S. Chess Star Did Well”
  77. (Duplicate) () The Indiana Gazette Indiana, Pennsylvania Wednesday, June 24, 1959 - Page 5, “Young Chess Champion Needs Assistance”
  78. (Duplicate) () The Daily Capital News Jefferson City, Missouri Thursday, June 25, 1959 - Page 4, “15 or 20 Lashes Might Aid Young Chess Champion”
  79. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Express and News San Antonio, Texas Saturday, June 27, 1959 - Page 53, “A Fine Feat - Placed Third in Interzonal Tourney”
  80. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Courier-Journal Louisville, Kentucky Sunday, June 28, 1959 - Page 35, “Book by U.S. Champion Bobby Fischer Contains His Best Tournament Games”
  81. (Unrelated) Sunday Gazette-Mail Charleston, West Virginia Sunday, June 07, 1959 - Page 64
  82. (Unrelated) Sunday Gazette-Mail Charleston, West Virginia Sunday, June 14, 1959 - Page 67
  83. (Unrelated) Abilene Reporter-News Abilene, Texas Friday, June 19, 1959 - Page 10
  84. (Unrelated) The Des Moines Register Des Moines, Iowa Saturday, June 20, 1959 - Page 11
  85. (Unrelated) The Press Democrat Santa Rosa, California Tuesday, June 23, 1959 - Page 1
  86. (Unrelated) St. Louis Post-Dispatch St. Louis, Missouri Monday, July 27, 1959 - Page 17

July 1959

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Express and News, San Antonio, Texas, Sunday, July 05, 1959 - Page 74, “Bobby Fischer at Zurich”
  2. (Vague mention) () The Corpus Christi Caller-Times Corpus Christi, Texas Sunday, July 05, 1959 - Page 51, “Chats on Chess”
  3. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Courier-Journal, Louisville, Kentucky, Sunday, July 12, 1959 - Page 37, “World Title Hope Seen In Fischer”
  4. (Library/Book List) () The Times, Shreveport, Louisiana, Sunday, July 12, 1959 - Page 58, “New Books At Shreve”
  5. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Sunday Gazette-Mail Charleston, West Virginia Sunday, July 12, 1959 - Page 22, “Anniversary of Log Cabin club”
  6. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Express and News San Antonio, Texas Sunday, July 19, 1959 - Page 72, “Another Zurich Game”
  7. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Hartford Courant Hartford, Connecticut Sunday, July 26, 1959 - Page 23, “Pocket Chess Set”
  8. (Unrelated) () Press and Sun-Bulletin Binghamton, New York Sunday, July 12, 1959 - Page 43
  9. (Unrelated) Press and Sun-Bulletin Binghamton, New York Sunday, July 12, 1959 - Page 8
  10. (Unrelated) The Sheboygan Press Sheboygan, Wisconsin Tuesday, July 14, 1959 - Page 11
  11. (Unrelated) Chicago Tribune Chicago, Illinois Tuesday, July 14, 1959 - Page 36
  12. (Unrelated) The Morning Herald Hagerstown, Maryland Friday, July 17, 1959 - Page 28
  13. (Unrelated) The Circleville Herald Circleville, Ohio Friday, July 17, 1959 - Page 7
  14. (Unrelated) Reno Gazette-Journal Reno, Nevada Wednesday, July 22, 1959 - Page 17
  15. (Unrelated) St. Louis Post-Dispatch St. Louis, Missouri Monday, July 27, 1959 - Page 17

August 1959

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Hartford Courant, Hartford, Connecticut, Sunday, August 02, 1959 - Page 104, “Young Contender”
  2. (Indirect Mention) () Sunday Gazette-Mail Charleston, West Virginia Sunday, August 02, 1959 - Page 34, “State Junior Chess Player Scores Well: Bobby Fischer and Sam Reshevsky Not Competing”
  3. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Miami News, Miami, Florida, Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 7, “'How About Check, Mate?'”
  4. (Duplicate) () The Bridgeport Post Bridgeport, Connecticut Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 24, “Chess Prodigy Seeks $2000 For Trip to World Playoffs”
  5. (Duplicate) () The Lawton Constitution Lawton, Oklahoma Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 7, “Fund Pinch Hits Young Chess King”
  6. (Duplicate) () The Sandusky Register Sandusky, Ohio Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 7, “Chess Prodigy Is Seeking Cash To Enter Playoffs”
  7. (Duplicate) () The Town Talk Alexandria, Louisiana Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 18, “U.S. Chess Champion Needs Money to Enter World Play”
  8. (Duplicate) () Miami Daily News-Record Miami, Oklahoma Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 20, “Young Yank Chess Master Seeks Funds for Playoffs”
  9. (Duplicate) () El Paso Herald-Post El Paso, Texas Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 10, “Chess Whiz' Ma Wants Money For Playoffs”
  10. (Duplicate) () The Daily Republican Monongahela, Pennsylvania Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 2, “Mother Seeks Financial Aid To Permit U.S. Chess Prodigy To Compete Abroad”
  11. (Duplicate) () The Town Talk Alexandria, Louisiana Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 9, “U.S. Chess Champion Needs Money to Enter World Play”
  12. (Duplicate) () Las Vegas Daily Optic East Las Vegas, New Mexico Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 20, “U.S. Chess Champ Hopes To Borrow To Play Chess”
  13. (Duplicate) () Shamokin News-Dispatch Shamokin, Pennsylvania Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 2, “America's Chess Prodigy Needs Funds for Playoffs”
  14. (Duplicate) () The Daily Notes Canonsburg, Pennsylvania Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 9, “Chess Champ's Mother Appeals For Finances”
  15. (Duplicate) () Anderson Daily Bulletin Anderson, Indiana Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 17, “Aid Asked For U.S. Teen-age Chess Prodigy”
  16. (Duplicate) () New Castle News New Castle, Pennsylvania Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 15, “Chess Champ Needs Cash For Contest”
  17. (Duplicate) () The Odessa American Odessa, Texas Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 3, “Chess Champ's Mother Appeals For Finances”
  18. (Duplicate) () The Bridgeport Post Bridgeport, Connecticut Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 47, “Chess Prodigy Seeks $2,000 For Trip to World Playoffs”
  19. (Duplicate) () The Levittown Times Levittown, Pennsylvania Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 3, “Chess Prodigy Needs Money To Compete”
  20. (Duplicate) () The Amarillo Globe-Times Amarillo, Texas Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 2, “Chess Star Needs Funds For Tourney”
  21. (Duplicate) () The Tribune Coshocton, Ohio Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 1, “Boy Needs More Money To Enter Chess Playoffs”
  22. (Duplicate) () The Pittsburgh Press Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 40, “Chess Prodigy Needs Cash To Enter Tourney”
  23. (Duplicate) () () Tyrone Daily Herald Tyrone, Pennsylvania Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 1, “America's Chess Prodigy Needs Cash To Compete”
  24. (Duplicate) () The Times Munster, Indiana Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 18, “Mom of Chess Prodigy Seeks Funds For Trip”
  25. (Duplicate) () The Daily Chronicle De Kalb, Illinois Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 11, “Attempts To Raise Funds”
  26. (Duplicate) () The News-Herald Franklin, Pennsylvania Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 14, “Seeks Financial Aid For Chess Prodigy”
  27. (Duplicate) () The News Journal Wilmington, Delaware Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 13, “Chess Prodigy Needs Cash for Tournament”
  28. (Duplicate) () The Weirton Daily Times Weirton, West Virginia Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 6, “Mother of Chess Prodigy Asks Aid For Youth's Appearance in Playoffs”
  29. (Duplicate) () The Miami News Miami, Florida Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 6, “'How About Check, Mate?'”
  30. (Duplicate) () The Press Democrat Santa Rosa, California Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 6, “U.S. Chess Champ In Need of Aid”
  31. (Duplicate) () The Times San Mateo, California Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 7, “Chess Prodigy Seeks Money”
  32. (Duplicate) () St. Louis Post-Dispatch St. Louis, Missouri Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 5, “Aid Sought To Send U.S. Boy To World Chess Playoffs”
  33. (Duplicate) () The Bonham Daily Favorite Bonham, Texas Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 2, “Mother Asks Aid For Son to Enter Chess Tournament”
  34. (Duplicate) () Simpson's Leader-Times Kittanning, Pennsylvania Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 13, “Chess Prodigy Needs Help To Enter World Play-offs”
  35. (Duplicate) () The Daily Register Harrisburg, Illinois Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 10, “Mother Appeals for Financial Aid For Prodigy Son for Chess Playoffs”
  36. (Duplicate) () Cumberland Evening Times Cumberland, Maryland Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 2, “Young Chess Champ Needs Financial Aid”
  37. (Duplicate) () The Brownsville Herald Brownsville, Texas Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 2, “Mom Appeals For Funds To Send Son To Europe”
  38. (Duplicate) () The Miami News Miami, Florida Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 19, “'How About Check, Mate?'”
  39. (Duplicate) () The Noblesville Ledger Noblesville, Indiana Friday, August 07, 1959 - Page 1, “The mother of America's chess prodigy, appealed for financial aid”
  40. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Daily Courier, Connellsville, Pennsylvania, Saturday, August 08, 1959 - Page 9, “Bobby Fischer Hopes to Take Chess Laurels”
  41. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) (Duplicate) () (Image) The Daily Courier, Connellsville, Pennsylvania, Saturday, August 08, 1959 - Page 7, “Bobby Fischer Hopes to Take Chess Laurels”
  42. (Duplicate) () The Journal News White Plains, New York Saturday, August 08, 1959 - Page 2, “Chess Is Expensive Game”
  43. (Duplicate) () The Daily Times New Philadelphia, Ohio Saturday, August 08, 1959 - Page 5, “Seek Funds To Send Chess Prodigy, 16, To European Meet”
  44. (Duplicate) () Ames Daily Tribune Ames, Iowa Saturday, August 08, 1959 - Page 4, “Young Chess Champ Needs Financial Aid”
  45. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Tampa Bay Times, St. Petersburg, Florida, Sunday, August 09, 1959 - Page 35, “Chess Genius Without Pin Money, Says Mom”
  46. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Des Moines Tribune, Des Moines, Iowa, Monday, August 10, 1959 - Page 6, “No Money for Travel For Our Chess Champ”
  47. (Duplicate) () The Amarillo Globe-Times Amarillo, Texas Monday, August 10, 1959 - Page 29, “Chess Star Needs Funds For Tourney”
  48. (Duplicate) () Eureka Humboldt Standard Eureka, California Monday, August 10, 1959 - Page 32, “U.S. Chess Prodigy Seeking Funds To Attend Tourney”
  49. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Austin American Austin, Texas Sunday, August 16, 1959 - Page 6, “U.S. Chess Genius 'Tied' for Funds” by Edith Kermit Roosevelt
  50. (Indirect Mention of Bobby Fischer, not present at competition) () Sunday Gazette-Mail Charleston, West Virginia Sunday, August 16, 1959 - Page 67, “State Chess King Is Likely Entrant”
  51. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Press Democrat Santa Rosa, California Sunday, August 16, 1959 - Page 45, “Sicilian Defense”
  52. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) St. Louis Post-Dispatch St. Louis, Missouri Friday, August 21, 1959 - Page 47, “Chess Funds Needed by Eleanor Roosevelt”
  53. (Duplicate) () () Dayton Daily News Dayton, Ohio Friday, August 21, 1959 - Page 37, “Funds Sought to Send Yank to Chess Meet”
  54. (Duplicate) () Poughkeepsie Journal Poughkeepsie, New York Friday, August 21, 1959 - Page 11, “Funds Sought to Send Yank to Chess Meet”
  55. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () () () (Image) (Image) (Image) The Indianapolis Star Indianapolis, Indiana Sunday, August 23, 1959 - Page 150, “Young Hoosiers Take To Chess”
  56. (Duplicate) The Indianapolis Star Indianapolis, Indiana Sunday, August 23, 1959 - Page 151, “Young Hoosiers Take To Chess”
  57. (Duplicate) () Austin American-Statesman Austin, Texas Monday, August 24, 1959 - Page 4, “One Mom Doing Best To Help Out Her Child”
  58. (Duplicate) () The Akron Beacon Journal Akron, Ohio Saturday, August 29, 1959 - Page 6, “Chess Champions Don't Die Rich”
  59. (Vague reference) () Hartford Courant Hartford, Connecticut Sunday, August 30, 1959 - Page 40, “Silver Anniversary of Log Cabin Chess Club”
  60. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Courier-Journal Louisville, Kentucky Sunday, August 30, 1959 - Page 40, “Zurich International Tournament: Another Stellar Performance”
  61. (Unrelated) Hartford Courant Hartford, Connecticut Tuesday, August 04, 1959 - Page 10
  62. (Unrelated) The Daily Telegram Eau Claire, Wisconsin Tuesday, August 04, 1959 - Page 7
  63. (Unrelated) Hartford Courant Hartford, Connecticut Tuesday, August 04, 1959 - Page 29
  64. (Unrelated) The Indianapolis Star Indianapolis, Indiana Tuesday, August 04, 1959 - Page 22
  65. (Unrelated) The San Bernardino County Sun San Bernardino, California Tuesday, August 04, 1959 - Page 19
  66. (Unrelated) The Times Record Troy, New York Tuesday, August 04, 1959 - Page 33
  67. (Unrelated) The Daily Times New Philadelphia, Ohio Saturday, August 08, 1959 - Page 6
  68. (Unrelated) The Bristol Daily Courier Bristol, Pennsylvania Wednesday, August 12, 1959 - Page 27
  69. (Unrelated) The Paris News Paris, Texas Friday, August 14, 1959 - Page 5
  70. (Unrelated) The Courier-Journal Louisville, Kentucky Saturday, August 15, 1959 - Page 23
  71. (Unrelated) The Montgomery Advertiser Montgomery, Alabama Wednesday, August 19, 1959 - Page 14

September 1959

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, September 04, 1959 - Page 19, “Bobby Fischer Leaves for Bled, Yugoslavia World Challengers' Tournament”
  2. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, September 06, 1959 - Page 157, “Draw Set Today In Chess Tourney: Pairings for Challengers' Play in World Event to Be Decided at Bled”
  3. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Casper Star-Tribune, Casper, Wyoming, Sunday, September 06, 1959 - Page 11, “New Books at Public Library”
  4. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Fort Lauderdale News Fort Lauderdale, Florida Sunday, September 06, 1959 - Page 48, “New Book”
  5. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) (Image) The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, September 06, 1959 - Page 32, “Challengers Start Play in Yugoslavia”
  6. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, September 08, 1959 - Page 48, “Keres Adjourns In Fischer Game: Soviet Ace Under Pressure by U.S. Ruler as World Chess Event Opens”
  7. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, September 09, 1959 - Page 57, “Fischer In Peril At Adjournment: U.S. Chess Ruler Is in Weak Position Against Petrosian After 41 Moves in Bled”
  8. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Asbury Park Press Asbury Park, New Jersey Wednesday, September 09, 1959 - Page 19, “Fischer Runs Into Troubles in Chess”
  9. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, September 10, 1959 - Page 47, “Fischer of Brooklyn Takes Chess Match From Keres at Bled”
  10. (Library/Book List) () The Dispatch, Moline, Illinois, Thursday, September 10, 1959 - Page 23, “New Public Library Books”
  11. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Tampa Bay Times St. Petersburg, Florida Thursday, September 10, 1959 - Page 19, “Chess Whiz, 16, Wins Match In International”
  12. (Duplicate) () The Courier Waterloo, Iowa Thursday, September 10, 1959 - Page 17, “Yank Boy Defeats Soviet In Chess Meet”
  13. (Duplicate) () The Times Record Troy, New York Thursday, September 10, 1959 - Page 44, “New York Boy Defeats Chess Foe, Then Loses”
  14. (Duplicate) () Tampa Bay Times St. Petersburg, Florida Thursday, September 10, 1959 - Page 39, “Chess Whiz, 16, Wins Match In International”
  15. (Duplicate) () The Plain Speaker Hazleton, Pennsylvania Thursday, September 10, 1959 - Page 24, “Chess”
  16. (Duplicate) () Fairbanks Daily News-Miner Fairbanks, Alaska Thursday, September 10, 1959 - Page 8, “Chess”
  17. (Duplicate) () The News-Review Roseburg, Oregon Thursday, September 10, 1959 - Page 6, “Chess”
  18. (Duplicate) () The Times San Mateo, California Thursday, September 10, 1959 - Page 22, “Chess”
  19. (Duplicate) () Casper Star-Tribune Casper, Wyoming Thursday, September 10, 1959 - Page 18, “Chess”
  20. (Duplicate) () Jim Thorpe Times News Jim Thorpe, Pennsylvania Thursday, September 10, 1959 - Page 4, “Chess”
  21. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Courier Waterloo, Iowa Friday, September 11, 1959 - Page 11, “Think Yank Boy To Get Draw In Chess Meet”
  22. (Duplicate) () Quad-City Times Davenport, Iowa Friday, September 11, 1959 - Page 32, “Chess Champions Don't Die Rich”
  23. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, September 12, 1959 - Page 16, “Fischer Defeats Gligoric At Bled: American Chess Champion Winner in 32 Moves”
  24. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Troy Record Troy, New York Saturday, September 12, 1959 - Page 22, “N.Y. Pair Moves Into Chess Lead”
  25. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Post-Standard Syracuse, New York Saturday, September 12, 1959 - Page 9, “Fischer and Benko Share in Chess Lead”
  26. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, September 13, 1959 - Page 297, “Fischer Gains Draw With Benko In Chess”
  27. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) (Image) The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, September 13, 1959 - Page 34, “Fischer Wins, Loses In Challengers' Tourney”
  28. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () () (Image) Sunday Gazette-Mail Charleston, West Virginia Sunday, September 13, 1959 - Page 66, “Simultaneous Exhibition”
  29. (Vague Mention. Topic of Mikhail Tal.) () The Journal Times Racine, Wisconsin Sunday, September 13, 1959 - Page 36, “Mikhail Tal”
  30. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Chicago Tribune Chicago, Illinois Sunday, September 13, 1959 - Page 50, “New Yorkers Fischer, Benko Draw in Chess”
  31. (Duplicate) () Asbury Park Press Asbury Park, New Jersey Sunday, September 13, 1959 - Page 13, “Fischer Tied”
  32. (Library/Book List) () The Courier Waterloo, Iowa Sunday, September 13, 1959 - Page 19, “Books added at Cedar Falls Library”
  33. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, September 14, 1959 - Page 41, “Petrosian Play Halted Fischer: Process of Attrition Led to First Setback for U.S. Chess Star at Bled”
  34. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, September 15, 1959 - Page 49, “Fischer's Match Adjourns In Bled: Olafsson Appears to Have Edge Over U.S. Star in Fifth Round of Chess”
  35. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, September 16, 1959 - Page 51, “Fischer Downed 2d Time In Chess: Tal Scores Over Brooklyn Youth in 41-Move Game at World Tourney”
  36. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, September 17, 1959 - Page 53, “Olafsson Downs Fischer In Chess: Icelander Defeats Brooklyn Boy in 45 Moves”
  37. (Library/Book List) () The Evening Independent Massillon, Ohio Thursday, September 17, 1959 - Page 18, “Library News”
  38. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, September 18, 1959 - Page 36, “Fischer, Smyslov Adjourn In Chess: Brooklyn Player Impresses Against Former World Champion at Bled”
  39. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, September 19, 1959 - Page 18, “Keres Reverses Loss To Fischer: Beats U.S. Chess Champion in Yugoslavia, Making Up for First-Round Defeat”
  40. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Sunday Gazette-Mail, Charleston, West Virginia, Sunday, September 20, 1959 - Page 66, “Speaking Of Chess: Charleston Club To Elect Officials”
  41. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, September 20, 1959 - Page 284, “Fischer, Smyslov Play In Deadlock: American and Russian Draw in 7th-Round Adjourned Game of Chess Event”
  42. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, September 22, 1959 - Page 48, “Petrosian Beats Fischer In Chess: Defeats American Champion in 32 Moves”
  43. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, September 23, 1959 - Page 48, “Fischer Defeats 10th-Round Rival: Triumphs Over Benko in 27 Moves With Forcing Play in Yugoslav Chess”
  44. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, September 25, 1959 - Page 36, “Petrosian Plays Draw With Keres: Fischer, on Defense Against Gligoric, Adjourns in 11th Round of Chess at Bled”
  45. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, September 26, 1959 - Page 20, “Keres Triumphs In 31-Move Game: Challengers' Chess Leader Defeats Benko—Fischer and Olafsson Adjourn”
  46. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, September 27, 1959 - Page 270, “Gligoric Defeats Fischer In Chess: Olafsson's Game With U.S. Youth Adjourned Again—Benko Upsets Smyslov”
  47. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) (Image) The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, September 27, 1959 - Page 29, “Challengers Tournament at Bled, Yugoslavia”
  48. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () () (Image) The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin Racine, Wisconsin Sunday, September 27, 1959 - Page 15, “World's Candidates”
  49. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Sunday Gazette-Mail Charleston, West Virginia Sunday, September 27, 1959 - Page 64, “Challengers Tournament, Bled Yugoslavia”
  50. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Orlando Sentinel Orlando, Florida Sunday, September 27, 1959 - Page 50, “Fischer Concedes Defeat”
  51. (Duplicate) () The Tennessean Nashville, Tennessee Sunday, September 27, 1959 - Page 32, “Fischer Concedes”
  52. (Duplicate) () The Tennessean Nashville, Tennessee Sunday, September 27, 1959 - Page 33, “Fischer Concedes”
  53. (Duplicate) () Express and News San Antonio, Texas Sunday, September 27, 1959 - Page 50, “Chess Forfeit”
  54. (Duplicate) () The Star Press Muncie, Indiana Sunday, September 27, 1959 - Page 27, “Loses Chess Match”
  55. (Duplicate) () Southern Illinoisan Carbondale, Illinois Sunday, September 27, 1959 - Page 10, “U.S. Loses At Chess”
  56. (Duplicate) () The Anniston Star Anniston, Alabama Sunday, September 27, 1959 - Page 19, “Defeat Is Conceded”
  57. (Duplicate) () Democrat and Chronicle Rochester, New York Sunday, September 27, 1959 - Page 53, “Chessman Concedes”
  58. (Duplicate) () The La Crosse Tribune La Crosse, Wisconsin Sunday, September 27, 1959 - Page 16, “Bob Fischer Concedes”
  59. (Duplicate) () Jefferson City Post-Tribune Jefferson City, Missouri Sunday, September 27, 1959 - Page 10, “Defeat Conceded”
  60. (Duplicate) () The Montana Standard Butte, Montana Sunday, September 27, 1959 - Page 17, “Concedes Defeat”
  61. (Duplicate) () Palladium-Item Richmond, Indiana Sunday, September 27, 1959 - Page 20, “Concedes Defeat”
  62. (Duplicate) () The Montana Standard Butte, Montana Sunday, September 27, 1959 - Page 17, “Concedes Defeat”
  63. (Duplicate) () Palladium-Item Richmond, Indiana Sunday, September 27, 1959 - Page 20, “Concedes Defeat”
  64. (Duplicate) () The Sunday News and Tribune Jefferson City, Missouri Sunday, September 27, 1959 - Page 20, “Defeat Conceded”
  65. (Duplicate) () The Missoulian Missoula, Montana Sunday, September 27, 1959 - Page 17, “Concedes Defeat”
  66. (Duplicate) () Springfield Leader and Press Springfield, Missouri Sunday, September 27, 1959 - Page 12, “Concedes Defeat”
  67. (Duplicate) () Messenger-Inquirer Owensboro, Kentucky Sunday, September 27, 1959 - Page 8, “Fischer Concedes Defeat”
  68. (Duplicate) () Asbury Park Press Asbury Park, New Jersey Sunday, September 27, 1959 - Page 18, “Fischer Concedes”
  69. (Duplicate) () Tallahassee Democrat Tallahassee, Florida Sunday, September 27, 1959 - Page 3, “Americans Concedes”
  70. (Duplicate) () The Decatur Herald Decatur, Illinois Monday, September 28, 1959 - Page 5, “U.S. Loses At Chess”
  71. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, September 30, 1959 - Page 46, “Draw By Fischer In Chess Likely: U.S. Champion Adjourns in 14th-Round Game Against Smyslov in 41 Moves”
  72. (Duplicate) () Arizona Daily Star Tucson, Arizona Wednesday, September 30, 1959 - Page 19, “Chess”
  73. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, September 29, 1959 - Page 51, “Fischer Is Beaten By Tal In 34 Moves: Latvian Outplays Brooklyn Youth In Chess at Bled”
  74. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Times Record Troy, New York Wednesday, September 30, 1959 - Page 23, “Match Adjourned”
  75. (Duplicate) () The Troy Record Troy, New York Wednesday, September 30, 1959 - Page 25, “Match Adjourned”
  76. (Unrelated) Nanaimo Daily News Nanaimo, British Columbia, Canada Tuesday, September 01, 1959 - Page 13
  77. (Unrelated) The Sentinel Carlisle, Pennsylvania Tuesday, September 01, 1959 - Page 7
  78. (Unrelated) Great Falls Tribune Great Falls, Montana Sunday, September 06, 1959 - Page 13
  79. (Unrelated) The San Bernardino County Sun San Bernardino, California Sunday, September 06, 1959 - Page 37
  80. (Unrelated) The Sentinel Carlisle, Pennsylvania Monday, September 07, 1959 - Page 5
  81. (Unrelated) Beckley Post-Herald Beckley, West Virginia Wednesday, September 09, 1959 - Page 8
  82. (Unrelated) Daily Press Newport News, Virginia Sunday, September 13, 1959 - Page 35
  83. (Unrelated) The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin Racine, Wisconsin Sunday, September 13, 1959 - Page 31
  84. (Unrelated) The Journal Times Racine, Wisconsin Sunday, September 13, 1959 - Page 31
  85. (Unrelated) The San Bernardino County Sun San Bernardino, California Wednesday, September 23, 1959 - Page 10
  86. (Unrelated) The News-Herald Franklin, Pennsylvania Saturday, September 26, 1959 - Page 5
  87. (Unrelated) The News Leader Staunton, Virginia Sunday, September 27, 1959 - Page 15

October 1959

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, October 01, 1959 - Page 45, “Fischer Picks Up 1½ Chess Points: Brooklynite Scores Victory and Draw in Yugoslavia”
  2. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Tennessean Nashville, Tennessee Thursday, October 01, 1959 - Page 48, “Fischer Wins in Chess”
  3. (Duplicate) () The Atlanta Constitution Atlanta, Georgia Thursday, October 01, 1959 - Page 46, “Gained a victory and a Draw”
  4. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Wisconsin Jewish Chronicle, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Friday, October 02, 1959 - Page 13, “The Year In Sports”
  5. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, October 03, 1959 - Page 13, “Fischer To Face Keres: U.S. Chess Champion to Play Tonight in Zagreb Match”
  6. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Green Bay Press-Gazette, Green Bay, Wisconsin, Saturday, October 03, 1959 - Page 16, “New Books Listed at Library”
  7. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, October 04, 1959 - Page 256, “Fischer Tops Keres In Yugoslav Chess”
  8. (Library/Book List) () The Courier, Waterloo, Iowa, Sunday, October 04, 1959 - Page 8, “Portrait of Nixon Among New Books at Waterloo Libraries”
  9. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) (Image) The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, October 04, 1959 - Page 40, “Keres Takes Lead In Challengers' Chess”
  10. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Sunday Gazette-Mail Charleston, West Virginia Sunday, October 04, 1959 - Page 65, “Challengers Chess Tournament in Bled, Yugoslavia”
  11. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Ogden Standard-Examiner Ogden, Utah Sunday, October 04, 1959 - Page 1, “U.S. Teenager Whips Russ Champ In Chess World Championships”
  12. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin Racine, Wisconsin Sunday, October 04, 1959 - Page 26, “Candidates Tournament”
  13. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Cincinnati Enquirer Cincinnati, Ohio Sunday, October 04, 1959 - Page 6, “Beats Soviet Chess Master”
  14. (Duplicate) () St. Louis Post-Dispatch St. Louis, Missouri Sunday, October 04, 1959 - Page 2, “U.S. Chess Champion Wins”
  15. (Duplicate) () Oakland Tribune Oakland, California Sunday, October 04, 1959 - Page 46, “U.S. Youth Beats Soviet Chess Champ”
  16. (Duplicate) () Independent Press-Telegram Long Beach, California Sunday, October 04, 1959 - Page 135, “U.S. Youth Defeats Russ Chess Master”
  17. (Duplicate) () The San Bernardino County Sun San Bernardino, California Sunday, October 04, 1959 - Page 20, “American's Victory Stuns Chess World”
  18. (Duplicate) () The Journal Times Racine, Wisconsin Sunday, October 04, 1959 - Page 26, “Candidates Tournament”
  19. (Duplicate) () The Des Moines Register Des Moines, Iowa Sunday, October 04, 1959 - Page 46, “U.S. Chess Victory”
  20. (Duplicate) () Albuquerque Journal Albuquerque, New Mexico Sunday, October 04, 1959 - Page 8, “Red Chess King Upset”
  21. (Duplicate) () Great Falls Tribune Great Falls, Montana Sunday, October 04, 1959 - Page 1, “U.S. Teen-ager Pulls Stunning Chess Victory”
  22. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Express and News San Antonio, Texas Sunday, October 04, 1959 - Page 103, “Candidates”
  23. (Duplicate) () Daily News New York, New York Sunday, October 04, 1959 - Page 4, “Bob Beats Red Grand Master” with an appended statement: “His trip was financed by contributions from all over the U.S. after an appeal by his mother.”
  24. (Duplicate) () Star Tribune Minneapolis, Minnesota Sunday, October 04, 1959 - Page 41, “Wins Chess Round” reads: “Bobby Fischer of Brooklyn Saturday night scored a surprise victory over Soviet grandmaster Paul Keres, leading player in the challengers round of the World Chess championships.”
  25. (Duplicate) () The Terre Haute Tribune Terre Haute, Indiana Sunday, October 04, 1959 - Page 50, “Surprise Victory”
  26. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, October 05, 1959 - Page 39, “Fischer Adjourns Petrosian Match: Has Initiative After 41 Moves in Chess but Draw Looms”
  27. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, October 06, 1959 - Page 50, “Tal Chess Leader With 11-5 Record: Beats Gligoric in 52 Moves and Overtakes Keres in Challengers' Tourney”
  28. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, October 07, 1959 - Page 54, “Tal Defeats Keres In Chess At Zagreb”
  29. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, October 08, 1959 - Page 53, “Tal Adds To Lead In Chess Tourney”
  30. (Library/Book List) () News-Journal Mansfield, Ohio Thursday, October 08, 1959 - Page 15, “Library List”
  31. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, October 09, 1959 - Page 38, “Fischer Gains Tie In Benko Match: U.S. Champion Plays To Draw After 42 Moves in Replay of Adjourned Chess”
  32. (Duplicate) () The Montgomery Advertiser, Montgomery, Alabama, Friday, October 09, 1959 - Page 23, “Gets Draw”
  33. (Duplicate) () Asbury Park Press, Asbury Park, New Jersey, Friday, October 09, 1959 - Page 21, “Fischer Draws Match”
  34. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Baltimore Sun Baltimore, Maryland Friday, October 09, 1959 - Page 6, “Fischer, Petrosjan In Draw”
  35. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Clarion-Ledger, Jackson, Mississippi, Saturday, October 10, 1959 - Page 8, “U.S. Draws With Reds”
  36. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, October 11, 1959 - Page 247, “Olafsson Holds Fischer To Draw: Point Split After 40 Moves at Zagreb”
  37. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) (Image) The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, October 11, 1959 - Page 40, “Tal Heads List In Yugoslav Tourney”
  38. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin Racine, Wisconsin Sunday, October 11, 1959 - Page 36, “Candidates Tournament”
  39. (Indirect discussion) () The Courier-Journal Louisville, Kentucky Sunday, October 11, 1959 - Page 44, “New Chess Book Gives Basic Rules” reads: “Bobby Fischer, the young American champion, is so popular in Yugoslavia that a chess club has been named after him, Chess Review reports. The Yugoslavs are said to be hopeful that Bobby may successfully challenge Soviet Russia's chess supremacy.”
  40. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Express and News San Antonio, Texas Sunday, October 11, 1959 - Page 84, “Candidates Tournament in Progress”
  41. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, October 12, 1959 - Page 26, “Tal Downs Fischer In Chess At Zagreb”
  42. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, October 13, 1959 - Page 49, “Keres Sets Back Benko, Gligoric: Victories Keep Soviet Star in Second Place Behind Tal in Zagreb Chess”
  43. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Arizona Republic Phoenix, Arizona Tuesday, October 13, 1959 - Page 50, “Fischer Holds Sixth”
  44. (Duplicate) () The Journal Times Racine, Wisconsin Tuesday, October 13, 1959 - Page 14, “Chess Champ Idle”
  45. (Duplicate) () The Tampa Tribune Tampa, Florida Tuesday, October 13, 1959 - Page 19, “Champ Idle”
  46. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, October 14, 1959 - Page 60, “Tal and Keres Gain In Chess At Zagreb”
  47. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, October 15, 1959 - Page 50, “Smyslov Sets Back Fischer in 48 Moves At Yugoslav Chess”
  48. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) (Image) The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, October 18, 1959 - Page 28, “Retains Hold on Sixth Place”
  49. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, October 19, 1959 - Page 43, “Tal Beats Smyslov, Lifts Lead In Chess”
  50. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, October 20, 1959 - Page 53, “Fischer Emerges With Chess: Brooklynite Holds Petrosian Even in 30-Move Game”
  51. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Index-Journal, Greenwood, South Carolina, Tuesday, October 20, 1959 - Page 8, “Library Lists 14 New Books Out This Week”
  52. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, October 21, 1959 - Page 58, “Keres' Careful End Game Beats Fischer in 55 Moves at Belgrade”
  53. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, October 22, 1959 - Page 50, “Fischer Subdues Benko In Tourney: U.S. Champion Scores in 39 Moves in Belgrade Chess”
  54. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, October 23, 1959 - Page 38, “Tal and Keres Gain Draws in Belgrade”
  55. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, October 24, 1959 - Page 18, “Keres Downs Tal In 79-Move Game: Fischer Plays Draw”
  56. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, October 25, 1959 - Page 296, “Tal Is Conceded Victor In Chess”
  57. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) (Image) The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, October 25, 1959 - Page 80, “Bobby Fischer in Final Rounds at Candidates Tournament”
  58. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Sunday Gazette-Mail Charleston, West Virginia Sunday, October 25, 1959 - Page 63, “Bobby Will Be Back”
  59. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Journal Times Racine, Wisconsin Sunday, October 25, 1959 - Page 11, “21st Round at Candidates Tournament”
  60. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, October 26, 1959 - Page 37, “Tal And Petrosian Play Draw In Chess”
  61. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, October 27, 1959 - Page 44, “Fischer And Tal Adjourn In Chess: Belgrade Game Halts After 41 Moves”
  62. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, October 28, 1959 - Page 45, “Tal Beats Fischer And Retains Lead”
  63. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Guardian London, Greater London, England Wednesday, October 28, 1959 - Page 10, “Fischer's fine play against Tal in chess tournament”
  64. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, October 30, 1959 - Page 24, “Tal Takes Challengers' Chess With a Draw in Closing Match: Fischer Beats Smyslov”
  65. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Courier-Journal Louisville, Kentucky Friday, October 30, 1959 - Page 34, “Mikhail Tal, Latvian grand master”
  66. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Indianapolis News Indianapolis, Indiana Friday, October 30, 1959 - Page 16, “Chess, Mikhail Tal Won the World Challengers Tournament”
  67. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, October 31, 1959 - Page 22, “New Chess Challenger”
  68. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, October 31, 1959 - Page 20, “Petrosian Takes Final Chess Game”
  69. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Asbury Park Press Asbury Park, New Jersey Saturday, October 31, 1959 - Page 9, “Fischer 5th In Chess Tournament”
  70. (Duplicate) () The Tampa Tribune Tampa, Florida Saturday, October 31, 1959 - Page 22, “Youth West's Top Chess Player” (Contains additional list of placements)
  71. (Duplicate) () The Tampa Tribune Tampa, Florida Saturday, October 31, 1959 - Page 20, “Youth West's Top Chess Player” (Contains additional list of placements)
  72. (Duplicate) () Arizona Daily Star Tucson, Arizona Saturday, October 31, 1959 - Page 2, “New Yorker, Bobby Fischer, 16, became the Western Hemisphere's champion chess player”
  73. (Duplicate) () Port Angeles Evening News Port Angeles, Washington Saturday, October 31, 1959 - Page 11, “Chess”
  74. (Duplicate) () Port Angeles Evening News Port Angeles, Washington Saturday, October 31, 1959 - Page 10, “Chess”
  75. (Duplicate) () Fairbanks Daily News-Miner Fairbanks, Alaska Saturday, October 31, 1959 - Page 6, “Chess”
  76. (Duplicate) () The Daily Chronicle Centralia, Washington Saturday, October 31, 1959 - Page 5, “Chess”
  77. (Duplicate) () The Times San Mateo, California Saturday, October 31, 1959 - Page 9, “Chess”
  78. (Unrelated) Monroe Morning World Monroe, Louisiana Sunday, October 04, 1959 - Page 15
  79. (Unrelated) The Courier-Journal Louisville, Kentucky Sunday, October 25, 1959 - Page 45
  80. (Unrelated) The Courier-Journal Louisville, Kentucky Sunday, October 25, 1959 - Page 84

November 1959

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Journal Times Racine, Wisconsin Sunday, November 01, 1959 - Page 34, “World Candidates Tournament”
  2. (Duplicate) () The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin Racine, Wisconsin Sunday, November 01, 1959 - Page 34, “World Candidates Tournament”
  3. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) (Image) The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, November 01, 1959 - Page 46, “Tal Point Ahead In Challengers' Chess”
  4. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Fort Lauderdale News Fort Lauderdale, Florida Sunday, November 01, 1959 - Page 24, “Candidates Tournament Taking Place in Yugoslavia”
  5. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The News Journal Wilmington, Delaware Monday, November 02, 1959 - Page 18, “Russia's National Game”
  6. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Indianapolis News, Indianapolis, Indiana, Tuesday, November 03, 1959 - Page 15, “Sport Shorts”
  7. (Library/Book List) () The News-Review Roseburg, Oregon Thursday, November 05, 1959 - Page 22, “Douglas County Library Arrivals”
  8. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Daily Tribune, Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin, Saturday, November 07, 1959 - Page 3, “T.B. Scott Library”
  9. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Sunday Gazette-Mail Charleston, West Virginia Sunday, November 08, 1959 - Page 62, “The Players Final Standing”
  10. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Fort Lauderdale News Fort Lauderdale, Florida Sunday, November 08, 1959 - Page 24, “Grandmaster Draws”
  11. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Journal Times Racine, Wisconsin Sunday, November 15, 1959 - Page 38, “Candidates Game”
  12. (Duplicate) () The Racine Journal-Times Sunday Bulletin Racine, Wisconsin Sunday, November 15, 1959 - Page 37, “Candidates Game”
  13. (Unrelated) News-Press Fort Myers, Florida Sunday, November 01, 1959 - Page 20
  14. (Unrelated) News-Press Fort Myers, Florida Sunday, November 08, 1959 - Page 21
  15. (Unrelated) News-Press Fort Myers, Florida Sunday, November 15, 1959 - Page 25
  16. (Unrelated) The Mainland Times La Marque, Texas Wednesday, November 18, 1959 - Page 2
  17. (Unrelated) The Pocono Record Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania Saturday, November 21, 1959 - Page 12
  18. (Unrelated) The Pocono Record Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania Saturday, November 21, 1959 - Page 24
  19. (Unrelated) The Guardian London, Greater London, England Monday, November 16, 1959 - Page 5

December 1959

  1. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Pittsburgh Press Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Thursday, December 03, 1959 - Page 2, “American Artist Arthur Elliot”
  2. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) (Image) The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, December 06, 1959 - Page 60, “U.S. Chess Championship”
  3. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, December 11, 1959 - Page 42, “Chess Group Balks At Fischer Demand”
  4. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Sunday Gazette-Mail Charleston, West Virginia Sunday, December 13, 1959 - Page 62, “U.S. Chess Championship Tournament”
  5. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Journal Times Racine, Wisconsin Sunday, December 13, 1959 - Page 23, “Fischer-Tal”
  6. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Wednesday, December 16, 1959 - Page 61, “Fischer Dropped From Title Chess in Pairings Dispute: Officials Reject Youth's Demands”
  7. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, December 17, 1959 - Page 54, “Replacement Sides With Fischer Stand”
  8. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, December 19, 1959 - Page 24, “Fischer Yields and Re-Enters U.S. Title Chess: Champion Drops Pairings Dispute”
  9. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) (Image) The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, December 20, 1959 - Page 28, “Reshevsky Wins First Game In Title Tourney”
  10. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, December 20, 1959 - Page 141, “Chess”
  11. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, December 20, 1959 - Page 149, “Fischer Achieves Fortunate Draw: Hard-Pressed by Byrne in U.S. Chess, Defender Splits Point on Technicality”
  12. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, December 21, 1959 - Page 37, “Reshevsky Draws With Benko In 16 Moves in U.S. Chess Play”
  13. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Tuesday, December 22, 1959 - Page 44, “Fischer A Victor Ties For Second: U.S. Chess Champion Beats Bisguier in 60 Moves”
  14. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Thursday, December 24, 1959 - Page 25, “Fischer Assumes Title Chess Lead: U.S. Champion Scores Over Ault—Reshevsky Beats Bisguier in 33 Moves”
  15. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Friday, December 25, 1959 - Page 28, “Pawn Line Break Wins For Fischer: Champion's Maneuver Key To Victory Over Ault in U.S. Title Chess”
  16. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Saturday, December 26, 1959 - Page 11, “Fischer To Meet Sherwin In Chess: Unbeaten Rivals Play Today in U.S. Tourney”
  17. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) (Image) The Los Angeles Times Los Angeles, California Sunday, December 27, 1959 - Page 31, “Fischer In Tourney; Reshevsky Leads”
  18. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Sunday, December 27, 1959 - Page 142, “Fischer, Sherwin Draw in 35 Moves: Defending Champion Keeps Lead in National Chess”
  19. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) Sunday Gazette-Mail Charleston, West Virginia Sunday, December 27, 1959 - Page 49, “National Chess Championship Tournament”
  20. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, New York, Monday, December 28, 1959 - Page 29, “Fischer Sets Back Seidman in Chess; Reshevsky Scores”
  21. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) The Courier-Journal Louisville, Kentucky Monday, December 28, 1959 - Page 12, “Chess Is Used As 'Parallel Bars'”
  22. (Bobby Fischer 1959 Blog) () (Image) New York Times, New York, Ne